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Jake Raby Fri Mar 02, 2012 8:13 pm

TGOT wrote: You enjoy dishing out the agony of anticipation. You sadist! :D
Honestly I don't know what I am going to do.. I have learned to tell stories and post pictures AFTER something works

Jake Raby Fri Mar 02, 2012 9:44 pm

Here are some update photos...

Here is Ken's Bus strapped on my Dynojet Chassis Dyno


Ground pounding power!!! NOT!
See all that bumpiness in the plots?? Thats indicative of poor combustion balance and being worn out.


One very tired drivetrain... The new drivetrain is going be downright SEXY!


Empty engine bay..


Still uploading the video..

Stuartzickefoose Fri Mar 02, 2012 9:56 pm

TGOT wrote: You enjoy dishing out the agony of anticipation. You sadist! :D

x2

Stuartzickefoose Fri Mar 02, 2012 9:57 pm

Jake Raby wrote: chazz79 wrote: I wouldn't call breakdowns exciting at all. I'm a technician too so the expectation is that whatever vehicle we take will get us there. Breaking down anywhere would be a huge pride shot.

I had my first event where I found myself on the side of the road broken down in an ACVW, unable to repair the issue with some tools on the side of the road in 2010. Thats when I broke the first of three rocker arms on my Wife's Vert engine because they were a sub-standard design. Luckily I never installed any of these on customers engines as I was using this car to test them when they started failing at 7,700 miles. Its a roller cammed engine, so some degree of insanity is to be expected, but not breaking three exhaust rockers in 4,000 miles. Till that day I had never loaded an AVW or Porsche that I had built from scratch onto a tow truck.


what...you didnt have a spare motor to bring back to install in a few mins? [-X :lol:


and ya, i got the pride thing now...but another huge pride part for me is saying i got it going myself....cause im just getting started in the Mech area...so i get to brag about how i fixxed an issue that i probably created in the first place.


i just re read that....i am very weird....lol.

Jake Raby Fri Mar 02, 2012 10:14 pm

I have had to use Beer to wash cylinder walls down while reassembling an engine in the middle of Glamis... That was so I could use 3 pistons that were a 92mm and one piston and cylinder was a machine in 88mm.. I HAD to do that to make it back 21 miles.

TGOT Fri Mar 02, 2012 11:01 pm

Jake Raby wrote: I have had to use Beer to

Not the beer! You really have a knack for kicking us where it hurts.

Stuartzickefoose Sat Mar 03, 2012 12:19 am

TGOT wrote: Jake Raby wrote: I have had to use Beer to

Not the beer! You really have a knack for kicking us where it hurts.


....so thats why the rum is always gone....someone tell Cap'n Sparrow!

bigbore Sat Mar 03, 2012 12:58 am

With that kind of power out put Jake you hardly had to strap it down. :lol:

Lionhart94010 Sat Mar 03, 2012 1:13 am

Jake, will you be looking at the EE20, Boxer Diesel, currently it has 147 HP and 258 lb-ft of torque, if it catches on(= availability in US) will it be something you may consider using (& redesign) for T2 or will Gasoline powered Subyís always be preferable?

Stuartzickefoose Sat Mar 03, 2012 1:27 am

Lionhart94010 wrote:
PS congratulations on your new daughter, had my first 11-29-11 love their little smiles! She will be raised helping dad maintain our T2ís; so when she get them she will know how to care for them :0)

kinda jelous...but at the same time...im only 19.5...so kinda not yet...but someday...id love to have a girl who can drop an engine alone by 9th grade...haha thatd be way cool...:D

Jake Raby Sat Mar 03, 2012 6:20 am

Here is the ground pounding video of the chassis dyno evaluation of the "36 horse"....LOL

chazz79 Sat Mar 03, 2012 7:20 am

Stuartzickefoose wrote: Jake Raby wrote: chazz79 wrote: I wouldn't call breakdowns exciting at all. I'm a technician too so the expectation is that whatever vehicle we take will get us there. Breaking down anywhere would be a huge pride shot.

I had my first event where I found myself on the side of the road broken down in an ACVW, unable to repair the issue with some tools on the side of the road in 2010. Thats when I broke the first of three rocker arms on my Wife's Vert engine because they were a sub-standard design. Luckily I never installed any of these on customers engines as I was using this car to test them when they started failing at 7,700 miles. Its a roller cammed engine, so some degree of insanity is to be expected, but not breaking three exhaust rockers in 4,000 miles. Till that day I had never loaded an AVW or Porsche that I had built from scratch onto a tow truck.


what...you didnt have a spare motor to bring back to install in a few mins? [-X :lol:


and ya, i got the pride thing now...but another huge pride part for me is saying i got it going myself....cause im just getting started in the Mech area...so i get to brag about how i fixxed an issue that i probably created in the first place.


i just re read that....i am very weird....lol.



If you're just getting started there's some terminology to get down before setting goals for yourself.

Mechanic- Low level entry parts replacement specialist. High school education at most required. May be able to self diagnose brake failures, fluid leaks, and minor ride complaints. Some ase certifications may be found in this category. General pay in this category is 12-15.00 hourly. The automotive equivalent of a hospital STNA.

Technician-Usually mechanics that have elevated their skills or attended trade schools (2year). Possesses most all relevent ase's to job field and continues education to expand into other areas. Leads lower level mechanics in the completion of tasks, Ie Mechanics will R&R at transmission for the technician to rebuild. 25.00+ is the average hourly in this knowlege range. The automotive equivalent of a hospital RN, it's where I'm at so don't let me come off as a butt-head.

Mechanical Engineer-Capable of designing, building and opperating most machines. Possesses the root knowlege of how mechanical, pneumatic, and hydraulic systems work. This person has the ability to not only repair, but modify and redesign. At this level you gain an understanding of material strengths and learn to build things to tollerance. Everything a mechanical engineer puts out is like a fingerprint. Every weld, gusset and wiring layout carries your signature and in a way what you put out is like one of your children. Oftentimes around engineers it's best to be objective. You'd probobly get away with calling their children ugly before you could get negative on their work. Most of the good ones are still receptive to criticism. Staff engineering jobs start around 80k annual and go up from there. If you're good you can write your own ticket though.

I've been through steps one and two. I'm bored and wading through step three. It's rough going through college with a pack of kids half my age (16 year olds graduating with associates degrees is the norm anymore) I'll get there as I have the strong thought in my head that I must learn something new daily for time on earth to be validated.

Feel free to leapfrog any of these steps! The only folks griping about paying their dues are dummies like me that took the hard road and actually did that. To them I say "Pay your dues, but don't bitch when a kid out of high school with a degree is your boss"

end thread jack/ rant

Bloog Sat Mar 03, 2012 9:18 am

chazz79 wrote: Stuartzickefoose wrote: Jake Raby wrote: chazz79 wrote: I wouldn't call breakdowns exciting at all. I'm a technician too so the expectation is that whatever vehicle we take will get us there. Breaking down anywhere would be a huge pride shot.

I had my first event where I found myself on the side of the road broken down in an ACVW, unable to repair the issue with some tools on the side of the road in 2010. Thats when I broke the first of three rocker arms on my Wife's Vert engine because they were a sub-standard design. Luckily I never installed any of these on customers engines as I was using this car to test them when they started failing at 7,700 miles. Its a roller cammed engine, so some degree of insanity is to be expected, but not breaking three exhaust rockers in 4,000 miles. Till that day I had never loaded an AVW or Porsche that I had built from scratch onto a tow truck.


what...you didnt have a spare motor to bring back to install in a few mins? [-X :lol:


and ya, i got the pride thing now...but another huge pride part for me is saying i got it going myself....cause im just getting started in the Mech area...so i get to brag about how i fixxed an issue that i probably created in the first place.


i just re read that....i am very weird....lol.



If you're just getting started there's some terminology to get down before setting goals for yourself.

Mechanic- Low level entry parts replacement specialist. High school education at most required. May be able to self diagnose brake failures, fluid leaks, and minor ride complaints. Some ase certifications may be found in this category. General pay in this category is 12-15.00 hourly. The automotive equivalent of a hospital STNA.

Technician-Usually mechanics that have elevated their skills or attended trade schools (2year). Possesses most all relevent ase's to job field and continues education to expand into other areas. Leads lower level mechanics in the completion of tasks, Ie Mechanics will R&R at transmission for the technician to rebuild. 25.00+ is the average hourly in this knowlege range. The automotive equivalent of a hospital RN, it's where I'm at so don't let me come off as a butt-head.

Mechanical Engineer-Capable of designing, building and opperating most machines. Possesses the root knowlege of how mechanical, pneumatic, and hydraulic systems work. This person has the ability to not only repair, but modify and redesign. At this level you gain an understanding of material strengths and learn to build things to tollerance. Everything a mechanical engineer puts out is like a fingerprint. Every weld, gusset and wiring layout carries your signature and in a way what you put out is like one of your children. Oftentimes around engineers it's best to be objective. You'd probobly get away with calling their children ugly before you could get negative on their work. Most of the good ones are still receptive to criticism. Staff engineering jobs start around 80k annual and go up from there. If you're good you can write your own ticket though.

I've been through steps one and two. I'm bored and wading through step three. It's rough going through college with a pack of kids half my age (16 year olds graduating with associates degrees is the norm anymore) I'll get there as I have the strong thought in my head that I must learn something new daily for time on earth to be validated.

Feel free to leapfrog any of these steps! The only folks griping about paying their dues are dummies like me that took the hard road and actually did that. To them I say "Pay your dues, but don't bitch when a kid out of high school with a degree is your boss"

end thread jack/ rant

Life experience trumps book learning anyday of the week.

Stuartzickefoose Sat Mar 03, 2012 9:54 am

Bloog wrote: chazz79 wrote: Stuartzickefoose wrote: Jake Raby wrote: chazz79 wrote: I wouldn't call breakdowns exciting at all. I'm a technician too so the expectation is that whatever vehicle we take will get us there. Breaking down anywhere would be a huge pride shot.

I had my first event where I found myself on the side of the road broken down in an ACVW, unable to repair the issue with some tools on the side of the road in 2010. Thats when I broke the first of three rocker arms on my Wife's Vert engine because they were a sub-standard design. Luckily I never installed any of these on customers engines as I was using this car to test them when they started failing at 7,700 miles. Its a roller cammed engine, so some degree of insanity is to be expected, but not breaking three exhaust rockers in 4,000 miles. Till that day I had never loaded an AVW or Porsche that I had built from scratch onto a tow truck.


what...you didnt have a spare motor to bring back to install in a few mins? [-X :lol:


and ya, i got the pride thing now...but another huge pride part for me is saying i got it going myself....cause im just getting started in the Mech area...so i get to brag about how i fixxed an issue that i probably created in the first place.


i just re read that....i am very weird....lol.



If you're just getting started there's some terminology to get down before setting goals for yourself.

Mechanic- Low level entry parts replacement specialist. High school education at most required. May be able to self diagnose brake failures, fluid leaks, and minor ride complaints. Some ase certifications may be found in this category. General pay in this category is 12-15.00 hourly. The automotive equivalent of a hospital STNA.

Technician-Usually mechanics that have elevated their skills or attended trade schools (2year). Possesses most all relevent ase's to job field and continues education to expand into other areas. Leads lower level mechanics in the completion of tasks, Ie Mechanics will R&R at transmission for the technician to rebuild. 25.00+ is the average hourly in this knowlege range. The automotive equivalent of a hospital RN, it's where I'm at so don't let me come off as a butt-head.

Mechanical Engineer-Capable of designing, building and opperating most machines. Possesses the root knowlege of how mechanical, pneumatic, and hydraulic systems work. This person has the ability to not only repair, but modify and redesign. At this level you gain an understanding of material strengths and learn to build things to tollerance. Everything a mechanical engineer puts out is like a fingerprint. Every weld, gusset and wiring layout carries your signature and in a way what you put out is like one of your children. Oftentimes around engineers it's best to be objective. You'd probobly get away with calling their children ugly before you could get negative on their work. Most of the good ones are still receptive to criticism. Staff engineering jobs start around 80k annual and go up from there. If you're good you can write your own ticket though.

I've been through steps one and two. I'm bored and wading through step three. It's rough going through college with a pack of kids half my age (16 year olds graduating with associates degrees is the norm anymore) I'll get there as I have the strong thought in my head that I must learn something new daily for time on earth to be validated.

Feel free to leapfrog any of these steps! The only folks griping about paying their dues are dummies like me that took the hard road and actually did that. To them I say "Pay your dues, but don't bitch when a kid out of high school with a degree is your boss"

end thread jack/ rant

Life experience trumps book learning anyday of the week.


wow....entry level mechanic describes me perfectly....ride control and brake diagnostics....thats about it....haha

thanks for the descriptions, that clears that up a bit...haha


and yes, i agree hands on is better than a book learner

Jake Raby Sat Mar 03, 2012 3:11 pm

Our "Education" illustrated. The last Engineer I had here lasted 4 months because he couldn't work his way out of a cardboard box with a sledgehammer.






bigbore Sat Mar 03, 2012 3:37 pm

chazz79 wrote: Stuartzickefoose wrote: Jake Raby wrote: chazz79 wrote: I wouldn't call breakdowns exciting at all. I'm a technician too so the expectation is that whatever vehicle we take will get us there. Breaking down anywhere would be a huge pride shot.

I had my first event where I found myself on the side of the road broken down in an ACVW, unable to repair the issue with some tools on the side of the road in 2010. Thats when I broke the first of three rocker arms on my Wife's Vert engine because they were a sub-standard design. Luckily I never installed any of these on customers engines as I was using this car to test them when they started failing at 7,700 miles. Its a roller cammed engine, so some degree of insanity is to be expected, but not breaking three exhaust rockers in 4,000 miles. Till that day I had never loaded an AVW or Porsche that I had built from scratch onto a tow truck.


what...you didnt have a spare motor to bring back to install in a few mins? [-X :lol:


and ya, i got the pride thing now...but another huge pride part for me is saying i got it going myself....cause im just getting started in the Mech area...so i get to brag about how i fixxed an issue that i probably created in the first place.


i just re read that....i am very weird....lol.



If you're just getting started there's some terminology to get down before setting goals for yourself.

Mechanic- Low level entry parts replacement specialist. High school education at most required. May be able to self diagnose brake failures, fluid leaks, and minor ride complaints. Some ase certifications may be found in this category. General pay in this category is 12-15.00 hourly. The automotive equivalent of a hospital STNA.

Technician-Usually mechanics that have elevated their skills or attended trade schools (2year). Possesses most all relevent ase's to job field and continues education to expand into other areas. Leads lower level mechanics in the completion of tasks, Ie Mechanics will R&R at transmission for the technician to rebuild. 25.00+ is the average hourly in this knowlege range. The automotive equivalent of a hospital RN, it's where I'm at so don't let me come off as a butt-head.

Mechanical Engineer-Capable of designing, building and opperating most machines. Possesses the root knowlege of how mechanical, pneumatic, and hydraulic systems work. This person has the ability to not only repair, but modify and redesign. At this level you gain an understanding of material strengths and learn to build things to tollerance. Everything a mechanical engineer puts out is like a fingerprint. Every weld, gusset and wiring layout carries your signature and in a way what you put out is like one of your children. Oftentimes around engineers it's best to be objective. You'd probobly get away with calling their children ugly before you could get negative on their work. Most of the good ones are still receptive to criticism. Staff engineering jobs start around 80k annual and go up from there. If you're good you can write your own ticket though.

I've been through steps one and two. I'm bored and wading through step three. It's rough going through college with a pack of kids half my age (16 year olds graduating with associates degrees is the norm anymore) I'll get there as I have the strong thought in my head that I must learn something new daily for time on earth to be validated.

Feel free to leapfrog any of these steps! The only folks griping about paying their dues are dummies like me that took the hard road and actually did that. To them I say "Pay your dues, but don't bitch when a kid out of high school with a degree is your boss"

end thread jack/ rant

Iam a Mechanic have been for over 40 years and proud of it. I have worked with many school trained technicians that couldn't repair there way out of wet paper bag. I repair things on cars that just make these techs scratch theres heads and say how in the hell did you do that? I don't like being called a tech I much prefer being called a Mechanic thank you very much. as far as a hourly I make 85.00 but Iam self employed.

blue77bay Sat Mar 03, 2012 4:33 pm

Jake Raby wrote: Our "Education" illustrated. The last Engineer I had here lasted 4 months because he couldn't work his way out of a cardboard box with a sledgehammer.






Just sittin here laughing as i well remember the "engineer " who recalculated the expansion rate of nickies and the pistons and "fitted " them to "his" specs ,i think you have the pics somewhere.
Funniest thing i ever saw!

chazz79 Sat Mar 03, 2012 5:57 pm

No offense to any of the old timers out there. The intent was to educate someone that is rising in a modern career field. Mechanic isn't a dirty word but not something you pay a school to teach you. Self made businessmen in a niche field do not fit the 99.9999% example I gave. Dealerships, fleet services, and most of the free world do. Putting "two year trade school in auto mechanics" on a resume will likely get it tossed out. It's akin to saying you studied to be a porn star by scrubbing floors at the local strip club viewing booths.

Jake.....everything you've shown here is mechanical engineering, that's why I tune in. I'm sorry the time you sublet the talent portion of your job that the engineer failed you. It goes back to the " write your own ticket" part of my rant. Hopefully you didn't pay him much. You write your own ticket and these are your babies. Its gotta beat sitting in a lab for 80k a year.

Jake Raby Sat Mar 03, 2012 6:57 pm

The last Porsche factory trained tech I had here lasted 5 months.. He needed a special tool for everything and when I pointed at a pile of scrap steel and a milling machine and told him to build that tool, he couldn't do it.. All the rest of us could and do..

Another time I had a guy that had every certification known to man.. He was a clock watcher that left shit loose all the time. I finally got tired of him watching the clock so one day as I walked past him carrying a 356 flywheel, I lost it, using the flywheel to smash the clock into a thousand pieces.. Then I walked off and fired him two days later.

How about when the "Boss" that has never set foot in a classroom as a student after high school ends up giving job interviews to people for a recent electronics position that we recently opened up... The 5 people that had a degree didn't get the job... The one that had the more drive and common sense with all practical application knowledge landed that position and has kicked ass! He graduated from the same high school that I did and he learned about electronics repairing thousands of CB radios for his dad who was n the salvage business... He would take 3 CB radios and build one good one out of them.. Building something from nothing is true engineering.

The real crazy thing is when the guy that barely graduated High School and was in "Special Ed" from 2nd grade on ends up teaching classes to Porsche technicians and shop owners from all over the world..

The learning center here at Raby Engine Development, where I teach my "Porsche M96 101" engine rebuild school.


Instructing how to set Porsche 996 variable valve timing using Porsche special tools.


My classroom at the Worldpac Training Institute Expo in January.


And the book..


Some people need a piece of paper on the wall to have a sense of accomplishment, Marines don't have that problem~

chazz79 Sat Mar 03, 2012 7:36 pm

Cool stuff there. I know a thing about making something from nothing. I work for a state agency as a fleet technician. We often have no budget, no tools, and our most advanced peice of shop machinery is our hunter string aligner (1984). It's expected we make something from nothing because, after all, the money I do get to spend comes from my own pockets....and yours. I'd love to have anything you have lying around there. I have more advanced equipment at home in my personal shop and often I do my state work here. I don't know if I should blame that on dedication or stupidity.

The flat rate, clock watching mentality is hard to shake. I like being an hourly schmuck as you're not under the gun to work fast and make mistakes. I still keep tabs on the mitchell book to insure that the state is pulling 60-80 billable hours out of the 40 I put in (and to insure that if my job is eliminated tommorrow I could still "hang" in the real world). The dealership life leads you to be dishonest in order to make a living. I do my best where I'm at to shake the stigma of lazy state worker. Since I've taken office there is nothing sublet. If it's in reach and motorized I do it all. Refer units, gensets, outside agency projects...I'm way overextended on time but I'm still thinking "Before I got here a company got paid 5000.00 of my (and your) tax dollars to drain 110 gallons of oil from a generator and change four filters", that will never happen again. I can do it myself for less than a grand.

Whatever you do, do it well! If you're just a cog in the machine then be the best damn cog you can be :)



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