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Five speed tranny?
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Lui
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2005 12:52 pm    Post subject: Re: Five speed tranny? Reply with quote

germansupplyscott wrote:
the easiest way to do what you are asking to do is to use slightly larger tires, this will also lower your rpms, but it will have the effect of a taller gear ratio.


Not a bad idea, I may consider that when my tires get worn. . . .
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steponmebbbboom
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2005 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ive never had any complaints about my gear spread, only my top end. Larger tires would be fine for me, if my engine was strong enough. It does feel as though it would pull harder, but as mentioned speeding up the fan would be necessary, which would probably add more horsepower draw and heat than extra cooling capacity. Also, there is less reserve torque for going up hills at speed.
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2008 7:19 pm    Post subject: RPM/fan speed Reply with quote

Anyone ever thought of or heard of a larger diameter crank pulley?
i.e. the opposite effect of a smaller diameter "power pulley"

Boy--we'll really need to do some math now--larger tires, 5 speed box
w/ different ratios, larger diameter crank pulley--

I stay in the slow lane and do about 65 max on the freeway--let em all blow by me at 90.

Perhaps Rolling Eyes we should all just "keep it stock"-- the German engineers were
absolutely brilliant.

Cheers......
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 7:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Randy in Maine wrote:
I noticed this from the Berg website,

"Interesting that the factory Porsche and late 091 bus 5 speeds have the exact same design as ours. "

I was assuming that a 5 speed 091 might have come from South Africa, Mexico or perhaps a diesel vanagon? I don't know.


On British specification, 1983~92/93 model VW Vanagons, 5-speed transaxles were a factory-stock specification with all 21 litre, fuel-injected, petrol engines (112 bhp @ 4800 rpm & 174 N.m @ 2800 rpm, C.R. = 105 : 1) and 16 litre turbo-diesel engines (70 bhp @ 4500 rpm & 138 N.m @ 2500 rpm). They were also a factory-fitted option for 19 litre, single-carburettor, petrol engines (78 bhp @ 4400 rpm & 150 N.m @ 2600 rpm, C.R. = 86 : 1) and 17 litre diesel engines (57 bhp @ 4500 rpm & 103 N.m @ 2800 rpm). In effect, one could obtain all post-1982, water-cooled VW Vanagon models, with 5-speed transmission, irrespective of engine specification.

You might also be interested to read some of the following topic threads, which include discussions and references, to using a 5-speed transaxle in a 1968~79 VW 1600 or 17/18/2000 Type 2:

Post subject: 5 speed trans for 78 Westy?

http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=239055&highlight=5speed+transaxle

Post subject: Engine RPM's on the hiway.

http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=225702&highlight=5speed+transaxle

Post subject: Stuffing the widest tires

http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=250085&highlight=5speed+transaxle


westy78 wrote:
Lui wrote:
. New question: If I have planned extensive travelling at 65, what are good times to take breaks? -- i.e. let the engine "rest." Obviously not when the engine is really hot, but after every three hours on the highway? Four? Any thoughts?


I think this depends more on the roads you are travelling, weather conditions, etc. I've driven over six hours at a time in my bus. If you have gauges and keep an ocassional eye on them and they are staying within the acceptable ranges, I say keep on truckin. These things were made to run. On the other hand if you are climbing major hills, one right after another and bucking a fierce head wind in hot air temps stopping every once in awhile might be a good idea. It all depends on the particular bus and how well in tune it's in.


Unless you are leaking or burning excessive quantities of oil, your engine should not need a rest! If the engine is prone to overheating, then one would probably need to make cooling-off stops, about every -hour or so!

Rest stops are more likely to be dictated by the need to top-up the fuel tank or to satisfy the needs of the driver(s) and/or passengers. Personally, I like to stop about every two hours or so, for perhaps 10~15 minutes, just to stretch my limbs and maybe visit a convenient, public convenience, which can often be found at motorway service areas and some laybys.

Driving on the motorways, tends to be rather soporific, so it's good to take regular breaks to minimise fatigue and loss of concentration. even better, is to avoid the motorways and take the scenic route, which might take longer in fact, but won't seem like it, because you won't get so bored.
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stupidsongs2
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 10:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Waste of time, you shouldn't be cursing that fast anyway, wind resistance causes gas millage to drop considerably above 60MPH.

If you want to go fast, spend the money you would on a 5-speed and just buy another car.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 2:12 pm    Post subject: Re: RPM/fan speed Reply with quote

cbcarch wrote:
Anyone ever thought of or heard of a larger diameter crank pulley?
i.e. the opposite effect of a smaller diameter "power pulley"...


(from the 'Old Trick' Department)
For the '68-'71 bays, still with the upright 1600-based engines, you can swap the generator/alternator pulley to a smaller diameter unit, say one from a Porsche 356 series(or an early 912?). Probably not cheap these days, nor necessarily available at every VW parts swapmeet, but it works to speed up the cooling fan and bump up the output of the gen/alt as well.


J.R.
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Bursch
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would get a five speed to get a lower 1st. Not to gain more speed in 5th. When you encouter serious terrain, the stock 1st gear is too tall and your clutch wont like it if you decide to get your bus up there.
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2008 5:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bursch wrote:
I would get a five speed to get a lower 1st. Not to gain more speed in 5th. When you encounter serious terrain, the stock 1st gear is too tall and your clutch wont like it if you decide to get your bus up there.


The British & European, 1983~92 VW 1900 Type 25 (i.e. T3 or Vanagon), 5-speed transaxle, would give one a 1st-gear ratio, almost the same as the 1968~79 VW 1600 Type 2 transaxle, whilst giving lower-revving in 5th gear than the 1976~79 VW 2000 Type 2's 4th gear.

Alternatively, the British & European, 1983~92 VW 1600 Type 25 (i.e. T3 or Vanagon) diesel, 5-speed transaxle, would give one a 1st-gear ratio, with a greater hill-climbing ability than the 1968~79 VW 1600 Type 2 transaxle, whilst giving a 5th-gear ratio, which enables marginally lower revving than the 1968~79 VW 1600 Type 2's 4th gear.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 7:24 am    Post subject: 1968~79 VW Type 2, five-speed transaxle transplant! Reply with quote

Here's a picture of the 1983~92 VW Type 25 (i.e. T3 or Vanagon) five-speed transaxle, as originally illustrated in the official VW (GB) Ltd. eight-page leaflet, "The new boxer engine for the Volkswagen Transporter and Bus", dated February 1983

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Both the four-speed and five-speed transaxles, of the 1983~92 VW Type 25 (i.e. T3 or Vanagon) models, have a side-mounted gear-change mechanism. To use either of these transaxles in any of the 1968~79 VW Type 2s, one would either need to modify the transaxle, to employ the 1968~79 VW Type 2's longitudinal gear-selector mechanism or install the 1983~92 VW Type 25's gear-selector mechamism, into the host 1968~79 VW Type 2.

Although I have yet to confirm the accuracy of the statement, Paul Miller, proprietor of Harry Harpics, VW & Porsche workshop, in Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex, informed me sometime ago (at the September 2000, Essex VW Club Show), that one of his customers claims to have transplanted a 1983~9 VW Type 2, 5-speed transaxle, into a 1968~79 VW Type 2, without modifying the transaxle selector mechanism!

The following comments were made to me, by Richard Jones, of RJES (i.e. Richard Jones Engineered Solutions), in North Staffordshire, England, who amongst other things, markets a complete replacement clutch housing of his own design, for easy matching of Subaru engines, to the transaxles of rear-engined VWs. Richard's full-time day job, is as a design engineer for JCB.

R J Engineered Solutions,
Tel. +44 (0) 7761 788669
e-mail: [email protected]
http://www.rjes.com

T25 transaxles in bays

I'm pretty familiar with both bay and T25 transaxles. I have various ones lying around, as I'm planning some similar work, but with Beetles as recipients, not bays. The 5 speed is, unfortunately, too long for a Beetle, but the 091 4 speed from a 2 litre bay can be made to fit (they're very much stronger). However, it is not a straight forward conversion, only really suitable for racers at present. One customer has just fitted one. However, I intend to see whether I can re-engineer the shift mechanism of an 091 to solve the problems associated with Beetle installation.

Regarding 5 speeds into bays, I wouldn't be surprised if it is possible. The 5th gear occupies the space where the 4 speed shift mechanism was, hence the side mounted shift on 5 speeds. The rod is so low on a T25, you could probably make it go under the torsion tube in a bay without too much trouble.


Richard informed me, that all the clutch housings from the transaxles of all rear-engined Volkswagens, can be interchanged. To use the five-speed transaxle from the diesel-engined, 1983~92 VW Type 25 (i.e. T3 or Vanagon), with a 1968~79 VW 1600 Type 2 or 1972~79 VW 17/18/2000 Type 2 engine, one would need to substitute the clutch housing, from the air-cooled engine's matching four-speed transaxle or any one of the four-speed or five-speed tansaxles, from the air-cooled or water-cooled, flat-four, petrol-engined, 1980~92 VW Type 25s. Bear in mind that early-model, 1983~92 VW 1900 Type 25, water-cooled petrol engines, used a 215 mm clutch; the later models employing the 228 mm clutch, in common with the 1985~92 VW 2100 Type 25.

The following Internet website link, gives a comprehensive listing (might not be absolutely complete) of 1980~92 VW Type 25s and the later South African 1993~2003 VW Type 25s.

http://www.syncro.org/FinalDriveRatios.htm

As a general summary, the 1983~92 VW Type 25 models, with 185 R14 tyres, 5-speed manual transmission & rear-wheel drive, tend to have either of following combinations of gear & final-drive ratios:

R 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th F.D.

48 bhp, 1588 cc, diesel, 185 R14 tyres 367 411 233 148 102 077 543
57 bhp, 1715 cc, diesel, 185 R14 tyres 367 411 233 148 102 077 550
78 bhp, 1913 cc petrol, 185 R14 tyres 367 411 233 148 102 077 483

70 bhp, 1588 c2c, turbodiesel, 185 R14 tyres 367 411 233 148 102 082 483
112 bhp, 2109 cc, petrol, 185 R14 tyres 367 411 233 148 102 082 457

When used in conjunction with tyre sizes, of standard or close to standard specification (e.g. 185 R14 aka 185/80 R14 or 195/70 R15, 215/65 R15, 195/65 R16 or 205/60 R16), these selections of five-speed transaxle gear & final-drive ratio combinations, seem reasonably well matched to the various standard, or moderately upgraded, air-cooled engines, providing closer-spaced ratios, plus more relaxed, 65~70 mph motorway cruising in 5th gear (for all but the low-power engines, which would have insufficient power, at low engine speed) and greater hill-climbing ability in 1st gear. These would certainly be better suited, than the early 902 or 915, Porsche 911 five-speed transaxles, whose standard ratios are ill matched to the VW Type 2 and are exceedingly expensive, even at second-hand prices.

My Swedish university-friend Kjell (we both studied in the School of Mechanical Engineering, at Cranfield Institute of Technology, during the early 1980s), who until a few years ago, was a long-serving Scania truck transmission designer, informed me that low engine-power output, combined with large vehicle weight and high aerodynamic drag (typical VW Type 2 circumstances!), necessitates a greater number of gears!

The transaxles (with appropriate, substituted clutch housing) from the 48 bhp, 57 bhp and 70 bhp diesel or turbodiesel engines, could reasonably be used with the standard 1584 cc (50 bhp), 1679 cc (66 bhp), 1795 cc (68 bhp) or 1970 cc (70 bhp) air-cooled engines, whilst those of the 78 bhp or 112 bhp engine, would be more appropriate for moderately upgraded air-cooled engines, such as my 1911 cc (estimated 91 bhp!?!), modified hybrid VW Type 2 & 4 engine (VW 411LE crankcase with internals, NPR 96 mm-bore pistons & cylinder barrels and "gas-flowed" VW 1800 Type 2 cylinder heads) or various manifestations of the upgraded VW Type 4, 2055 cc and 2260 cc alternatives (96 mm-bore pistons & cylinder barrels, with either 71 mm or 78 mm stroke crankshaft).


1972~79 VW 1600 Type 2 & 1972~73 VW 1700 Type 2, four-speed transaxle:

Final-drive ratio = 5375

4th gear ratio = 082
4th to 3rd x factor = 154
3rd gear ratio = 126
3rd to 2nd x factor = 164
2nd gear ratio = 206
2nd to 1st x factor = 184
1st gear ratio = 380

Overall gear ratio = individual gear ratio x final-drive ratio

4th gear overall ratio = 441
4th to 3rd x factor = 154
3rd gear overall ratio = 677
3rd to 2nd x factor = 164
2nd gear overall ratio = 1107
2nd to 1st x factor = 184
1st gear overall ratio = 2042


1974~75 VW 1800 Type 2, four-speed transaxle:

Final-drive ratio = 4857

4th gear ratio = 089
4th to 3rd x factor = 142
3rd gear ratio = 126
3rd to 2nd x factor = 164
2nd gear ratio = 206
2nd to 1st x factor = 183
1st gear ratio = 378

Overall gear ratio = individual gear ratio x final-drive ratio

4th gear overall ratio = 432
4th to 3rd x factor = 142
3rd gear overall ratio = 612
3rd to 2nd x factor = 164
2nd gear overall ratio = 1001
2nd to 1st x factor = 183
1st gear overall ratio = 1836


1976~79 VW 2000 Type 2, four-speed transaxle:

Final-drive ratio = 4571

4th gear ratio = 088
4th to 3rd x factor = 143
3rd gear ratio = 126
3rd to 2nd x factor = 164
2nd gear ratio = 206
2nd to 1st x factor = 183
1st gear ratio = 378

Overall gear ratio = individual gear ratio x final-drive ratio

4th gear overall ratio = 404
4th to 3rd x factor = 143
3rd gear overall ratio = 576
3rd to 2nd x factor = 164
2nd gear overall ratio = 942
2nd to 1st x factor = 183
1st gear overall ratio = 173


1987 etc VW 1700 Vanagon (diesel), five-speed transaxle:

Final-drive ratio = 550

5th gear ratio = 077
5th to 4th x factor = 132
4th gear ratio = 102
4th to 3rd x factor = 145
3rd gear ratio = 148
3rd to 2nd x factor = 157
2nd gear ratio = 233
2nd to 1st x factor = 176
1st gear ratio = 411

Overall gear ratio = individual gear ratio x final-drive ratio

5th gear overall ratio = 424
5th to 4th x factor = 132
4th gear overall ratio = 561
4th to 3rd x factor = 145
3rd gear overall ratio = 814
3rd to 2nd x factor = 157
2nd gear overall ratio = 1282
2nd to 1st x factor = 176
1st gear overall ratio = 2260



1987 etc VW 1600 Vanagon (turbodiesel), five-speed transaxle:

Final-drive ratio = 483

5th gear ratio = 082
5th to 4th x factor = 124
4th gear ratio = 102
4th to 3rd x factor = 145
3rd gear ratio = 148
3rd to 2nd x factor = 157
2nd gear ratio = 233
2nd to 1st x factor = 176
1st gear ratio = 411

Overall gear ratio = individual gear ratio x final-drive ratio

5th gear overall ratio = 396
5th to 4th x factor = 124
4th gear overall ratio = 493
4th to 3rd x factor = 145
3rd gear overall ratio = 715
3rd to 2nd x factor = 157
2nd gear overall ratio = 1125
2nd to 1st x factor = 176
1st gear overall ratio = 1985


1987 etc VW 1900 Vanagon (petrol), five-speed transaxle:

Final-drive ratio = 483

5th gear ratio = 077
5th to 4th x factor = 132
4th gear ratio = 102
4th to 3rd x factor = 145
3rd gear ratio = 148
3rd to 2nd x factor = 157
2nd gear ratio = 233
2nd to 1st x factor = 176
1st gear ratio = 411

Overall gear ratio = individual gear ratio x final-drive ratio

5th gear overall ratio = 372
5th to 4th x factor = 132
4th gear overall ratio = 493
4th to 3rd x factor = 145
3rd gear overall ratio = 715
3rd to 2nd x factor = 157
2nd gear overall ratio = 1125
2nd to 1st x factor = 176
1st gear overall ratio = 1985


1987 etc VW 2100 Vanagon (petrol - EFI), five-speed transaxle:

Final-drive ratio = 457

5th gear ratio = 082
5th to 4th x factor = 124
4th gear ratio = 102
4th to 3rd x factor = 145
3rd gear ratio = 148
3rd to 2nd x factor = 157
2nd gear ratio = 233
2nd to 1st x factor = 176
1st gear ratio = 411

Overall gear ratio = individual gear ratio x final-drive ratio

5th gear overall ratio = 375
5th to 4th x factor = 124
4th gear overall ratio = 466
4th to 3rd x factor = 145
3rd gear overall ratio = 676
3rd to 2nd x factor = 157
2nd gear overall ratio = 1165
2nd to 1st x factor = 176
1st gear overall ratio = 1878
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 2:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very useful information Nigel!

Changing to vanagan can't be easy since you never see it around.
Soooo, will a 091 bellhousing fit a vanagon transaxle?
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Changing to a 901 can't be to hard as most of it bolts up. The shifter on a 911/912 901 exits out the back close to a 091 tranny. A little mod is necessary but works from what I have heard. 901 gears are easy to obtain and fairly cheap but not the parts for a rebuild anymore. The 901 is a stout tranny taking upto 300hp without a problem. The shift pattern is the same as the vanagon 5 speed.

I had toyed with this swap as I have a few extra 901 laying around but went ahead with rebuilding and adding LSD to the 901 as its geared just fine with the Camper Special. Even 1st is fine now with the LSD as I can climb steep gravel roads without one wheel loosing traction.
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For those interested in custom gearing, here's an Excel application I made, free to download:
http://excel.icbm.org/applications.html

I used the earlier version for my TIII 5-speed. Truth be told, there's nothing like experiencing the real thing. Sometimes numbers on paper just don't tell you enough compared to what your body can experience.
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2008 7:40 am    Post subject: 1968~79 VW Type 2, five-speed transaxle transplant! Reply with quote

Bleyseng wrote:
Changing to a 901 can't be to hard as most of it bolts up. The shifter on a 911/912 901 exits out the back close to a 091 tranny. A little mod is necessary but works from what I have heard. 901 gears are easy to obtain and fairly cheap but not the parts for a rebuild anymore. The 901 is a stout tranny taking upto 300hp without a problem. The shift pattern is the same as the vanagon 5 speed.

I had toyed with this swap as I have a few extra 901 laying around but went ahead with rebuilding and adding LSD to the 901 as its geared just fine with the Camper Special. Even 1st is fine now with the LSD as I can climb steep gravel roads without one wheel loosing traction.


One seldom sees Porsche 911s on the road here and I've only seen two VW-Porsche 914s during the past 30 years or so, of which one was a Danish registered, left-hand drive VW-Porsche 914-6.

Second-hand transaxles, originating from rear-engined Porsche 911s or mid-engined VW-Porsche 914s, are far from common here and likely to be extremely expensive. However, I would be interested to learn of the factory-stock gear & final drive ratios in addition to the custom replacement options.
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2008 7:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://members.rennlist.com/chuxter/901&915ratios.htm


The 901 tranny is designed so the gear stack can be removed without removing the whole tranny but this is for mid engine designed cars not a bus.
Gear ratios are available and plentiful, of course the oddball gears are expensive as Porsche made limited quanities of them for racing.

Standard ratios (found in production cars) are fairly cheap.

I run a close ratio gear box in my 914- A,F,M,S,ZD.
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2008 8:05 am    Post subject: 1968~79 VW Type 2, five-speed transaxle transplant! Reply with quote

Bleyseng wrote:
http://members.rennlist.com/chuxter/901&915ratios.htm


The 901 tranny is designed so the gear stack can be removed without removing the whole tranny but this is for mid engine designed cars not a bus.
Gear ratios are available and plentiful, of course the oddball gears are expensive as Porsche made limited quanities of them for racing.

Standard ratios (found in production cars) are fairly cheap.

I run a close ratio gear box in my 914- A,F,M,S,ZD.


From what I have read in British VW magazines, a second-hand Porsche 901 or 915 five-speed transaxle, would typically cost 500 (i.e. > US$1,000) for a very cheap one, but more likely 1000 (i.e. > US$2,000).

How does one decipher the chart, at the aforementioned link, to elucidate the numerical values for the individual Reverse, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th & Final Drive gear ratios. The chart as presented, is one of the least clear presentations of information, I have encountered! Confused
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Bleyseng
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2008 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Used 901's go for $200-300 dollars as most need some work. Most guys find a another used one and swap parts to make a decent one.

Rebuilds cost about $2000 but thats mostly due to part cost. New parts are $$$$.

Even in Holland (where I visit family yearly) 901's are cheap. Parts sourced from Germany are cheaper.

The 4's mean the stock gear sets for a 914 4.
The 6's mean the stock gear sets for a 914 6.

The rest are all the gear set made and there was alot of them as the 901 was used in lots of race cars.
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alikatcraig
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2008 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.thesamba.com/vw/classifieds/detail.php?id=504197

This is a new intermediate housing to convert your bus box to 5 speed.

Lui is running a 1976 motor which came with a 4.57 R&P/0.88 4th with a box that has a 5.375 R&P and 0.82 4th. There should be some room to play with gearing in there and still keep RPM high enough to cool the motor. I will post a gear calculator link Monday that really helps.

I have just swapped out my bug 4.37 R&P with 0.93 4th for a 3.875 and 0.89 4th. It has a 2l motor and will still turn enough RPM at 70 to cool it. Also the motor is not as strained getting there, as anyone who has ever overloaded a VW will know.
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2008 5:13 am    Post subject: 1968~79 VW Type 2, five-speed transaxle transplant! Reply with quote

alikatcraig wrote:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/classifieds/detail.php?id=504197

This is a new intermediate housing to convert your bus box to 5 speed.

Lui is running a 1976 motor which came with a 4.57 R&P/0.88 4th with a box that has a 5.375 R&P and 0.82 4th. There should be some room to play with gearing in there and still keep RPM high enough to cool the motor. I will post a gear calculator link Monday that really helps.

I have just swapped out my bug 4.37 R&P with 0.93 4th for a 3.875 and 0.89 4th. It has a 2l motor and will still turn enough RPM at 70 to cool it. Also the motor is not as strained getting there, as anyone who has ever overloaded a VW will know.


An interesting idea, but at US$1995 (i.e. more that 1,100 at present currency exchange rates!) for the kit, it's way out of my league!

Noting the following statement in the advertisement, the kit is still not yet appropriate for the 1968~79 VW 1600 & 17/18/2000 Type 2.

Currently fits Sedan and 1967 and earlier Bus only.

This further statement, would also render the project rather inconvenient and more expensive, for owners outside of North America.

We will also require your pinion & mainshafts for lengthening.
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lookitsjeff75
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 8:23 pm    Post subject: Am I safe to go 60? Reply with quote

My '72 Transporter has a four speed, but whenever I try to go the speed limit (60) the engine seems to just be screaming, and I can't imagine that being a normal noise to hear at that speed. Do I need a 5-speed tranny, or just a lower gear ratio? I'm open to any suggestions!
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cobhc619
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 28, 2009 1:41 am    Post subject: Re: Am I safe to go 60? Reply with quote

lookitsjeff75 wrote:
My '72 Transporter has a four speed, but whenever I try to go the speed limit (60) the engine seems to just be screaming, and I can't imagine that being a normal noise to hear at that speed. Do I need a 5-speed tranny, or just a lower gear ratio? I'm open to any suggestions!


Yea mine too but i'm thinking it could be my beat up exhaust making it sound bad.
Seen a few threads about engine operating conditions and top speed/cruising speed... Is it possible that VW said the top speed and cruising speed are like 70-75 so their vehicles would comply with I guess U.S regulations back in the day even though the engines are happier and last longer if you cruise around 60-65?? Saying the top speed is cruising speed seems like saying a hondas cruising speed is at 6k RPM.. Just wondering
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