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Foxx Fri Feb 17, 2006 12:26 pm

for all the questions on welding equipment.
and some other welding info too

http://forum.doityourself.com/archive/index.php/f-106-p-2.html

usefull welding link
http://www.mig-welding.co.uk/learning-mig.htm

Russ Wolfe Sun Feb 19, 2006 2:16 pm

OK, I will be first.
I bought a used Clarke 100E welder at a swap meet for very cheap.
http://classicvw.org/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.ShowItem&g2_itemId=1966
I have the welder working, but need to know how to set the current with the rocker switches.
Does anyone have a manual for this welder, that could scan the instructions, or explain to me how they work??
Thank you in advance.

renderit Sun Feb 19, 2006 4:32 pm

Here's one for you. I need to take classes and all, but a friend mentioned that if I'm spending most of my time on sheet metal I'd be happier with TIG than MIG. What do you think?

marklaken Mon Feb 20, 2006 10:14 am

TIG is more versatile and produces beautiful welds, but it is much more expensive - you can still do very good welding with a MIG and the equipment cost is about half ($600 for MIG compared to $1.2k for TIG)

I think TIG is for the everyday/pro welder/fabricator - MIG is for the hobbyist/DIYer

Matt K. Mon Feb 20, 2006 12:00 pm

I agree with Mark, unless you are a fabricator that requires the specific strength and precision of a tig weld than you are better off learning on a mig. When i started welding classes, i started on a "buzz box" or arc welder and the use of torch "gas welding" then to mig and tig mig is the most widely used in both fabrication and body shop repair.

Russ Wolfe Fri Mar 10, 2006 9:00 pm

A TIG is just like welding with a torch, except the heat is supplied by an arc, instead of a flame.
I love welding with a torch.

tfitz9 Sun Mar 19, 2006 4:59 pm

Bug me Video demonstrates use of a Eastwood spot welder GUN that attaches to a 110volt stick welder and is used in replacing body panels

The procedure appears simple and just right for a guy WITHOUT welding experience

Anyone have any expierence with this method? Are there other suppliers of this gun?

Comments invited

renderit Thu Apr 06, 2006 1:31 pm

Looking for a 110 mig. What is the best one out there.

wileysc71 Tue Apr 25, 2006 7:00 am

renderit wrote: Looking for a 110 mig. What is the best one out there.
I don't know what the heck I'm doing with it yet, but based on advice I got here.........I bought a Lincoln 135Plus (infinite controls for voltage/feed).......and I love it. Used it a couple of times for practice and gave it a go on some real body panels. Penetrats nicely w/no burn through.

bunnytrucker Fri Apr 28, 2006 3:00 pm

I just got a bus and I need to do alot of rust repair. So that means alot of cutting and welding. I can weld alright but I dont know much about welders. I want something that I wont have a problem welding sheet metal with. Should I go with a 110 or 220? From what I have heard 110 seems to be better for this application. Is this true? I was thinking of getting a 110 gas option mig. But for not much more I can get a nice 220 mig. But i have had problems welding sheet medal in the past with 220 welders. I don't want to buy one and then find out that it will just burn holes. What do you think :?:

Jowlz Fri Apr 28, 2006 3:28 pm

bunnytrucker wrote: I just got a bus and I need to do alot of rust repair. So that means alot of cutting and welding. I can weld alright but I dont know much about welders. I want something that I wont have a problem welding sheet metal with. Should I go with a 110 or 220? From what I have heard 110 seems to be better for this application. Is this true? I was thinking of getting a 110 gas option mig. But for not much more I can get a nice 220 mig. But i have had problems welding sheet medal in the past with 220 welders. I don't want to buy one and then find out that it will just burn holes. What do you think :?:

I'd go 220v. Make sure its infinately va. I have never had issues with doing sheet with 220. Make sure you turn down the heat. The advantage with 220 will be it is capable of welding thicker materials. If you are burning thru, try less heat. Also try moving the torch faster, as pausing is a good way to burn thru.

renderit Sat Apr 29, 2006 5:18 am

What Jowlz said is true. The only advantage of the 110 unit is you don't have to worry about plugins. I.e. if you want to roll it over to the neighbor's at night and weld his doors shut using his power you can do it. If you had the 220 unit you have to break in, pull the Dryer plug and do it from there. See the versatility difference?

rossmda Mon May 01, 2006 11:42 am

Home Depot and lowes sell lincoln mig welders. I have been using one for 4 years, flux core. Yes flux core. Just requires a little more cleanup when you complete a weld and you have to take a little more time. I also have used the gas when welding and the results are damn near the same each time, with the exception of the cleanup with a wire wheel on the flux core. Flux tends to burn ya a little more from sparks, but hey I was on a tight budget when I bought it and don't use it enough to get the bottle hookup

lostinbaja Tue May 16, 2006 7:01 pm

If you are looking to buy a Lincoln Mig welder you are better off buying it from a welding supply store. The units sold by the welding supply stores have a higher duty cycle then the same size machine from Home Depot. The welding supply store can also help you with any problems you have.
Jerry...

wileysc71 Wed May 17, 2006 11:27 am

lostinbaja wrote: If you are looking to buy a Lincoln Mig welder you are better off buying it from a welding supply store. The units sold by the welding supply stores have a higher duty cycle then the same size machine from Home Depot. The welding supply store can also help you with any problems you have.
Jerry...
AND...a good store will have a demo area setup where you can try it out before you buy it.

bunnytrucker Mon May 22, 2006 2:35 am

Well I got a welder. I went with the 110 for a few reasons. The biggest reason was because the 220 welder in my price range could only handle an extra 16th over the 110 at $150 price difference. So I ended getting a Clarke 180en. Awesome welder! 10 year warranty too. Gas or no gas. It is IMO perfect for the application. I recommend it highly! Price is good too. $300 on Ebay and it came with the regulater for gas as well.

mcatak Sun Jun 18, 2006 2:03 pm

any input from here about the "low priced" Chicargo Electric 90 amp MIG welders on ebay?

Volkswagenaholic Sun Jun 18, 2006 6:47 pm

so what welder is best for a restoration shop? a MIG? or a TIG?

stancey53 Fri Jun 30, 2006 9:09 am

The Chicago Welders, all of them, SUCK! Harbor Freight sells a lot of Chicago Electric stuff. Its funny, I don't recall there being a Chicago in China but apparently there is as this is where these welders are made.

I bought a 220v one from Harbor Freight last fall and it didn't work. Flat out didn't work straight from the box. I called HF and they sent me a new one. Took it out of the box and, you guessed it, it didn't work. I talked to a tech support person from HF who said that it was likley a bad circuit board in each welder. They offered to send me a new board to install myself. Needless to say, I got my money back and bought a Hobart.

Towel Rail Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:59 pm

An auto-dimming helmet (mine is a Speedglas) is an excellent investment, too. Nothing beats being able to point and weld without having to pull down your helmet or look away as you do the weld. You only get one pair of eyes... 8)



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