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lostinbaja Sat Mar 26, 2011 8:04 am

Many years ago my Brother's Baja was rear ended on the expressway at 5:00am by a drunk driver travelling in excess of 100mph. Needless to say the Baja went for a tumble. A witness stated the car rolled 6 times the endo'd a couple times. My Brother was wearing the stock seat belts, his harnesses came via UPS the same day the car was wrecked.
Roll bar padding would have saved him from many stitches in his head.
The roll cage matches #253-39 on the chart in the thread. The was made from .095 x 1 1/2 seam welded mild steel tubing. The cage held up very well with some bending of the front hoop when it hit the guard rail.
Here are some pic's of the car. http://www.manxgallery.org/gallery/album195

sloboatnova Sat Mar 26, 2011 4:00 pm

Damn. I hate drunk drivers!

oldsandbuggy Sun Mar 27, 2011 7:24 pm

Safety tip for sand rails... Think serious about installing a roof panel. Ive heard horror stories about sand rails that flip over on a dune, and the rail ends up "Digging" into the sand and cause head and neck injuries.

A simple .050" aluminum panel on the top prevents all this from happening. if it flips it just acts like a ski.

Smallsc111 Wed Jun 13, 2012 10:32 am

clearsurf2001 wrote: A note about Harbor Freight. Their tools are often the cheapest available (usually for good reason) but ... with regard to hand tools ... they are the perfect source for a tool that you need to disfigure for a specific purpose. I've had many occasions to "create" a tool to reach an out of the way fastener or modify a normal tool to perform a task it wasn't intended for. Harbor Freight to the rescue. For a minimal outlay, and some time with the grinder/welder/hammer, etc. ... the special tool rises out of the ashes. Nevermind that it can't be used anywhere else (or maybe it will only be used once) ... it was cheap and it got the job done. No replacement for top notch hand tools mind you ... but a little money and creativity can often save the day ... thanks Harbor Freight.

I totally agree with this, I got a set of 4 chisels and made a tool to remove the oil relief plug, remove dashboard switches and still have 2 to create with when I need to. Best 6 bucks I ever spent! Also I have a set of Ball Pein hammers from them, I just got new handles so they are great and for a lot less than buying them from anywhere else

VRPBaja Wed Dec 19, 2012 10:49 pm

tie stuff down inside the car! sure a tissue box wont hurt much. but any tools or tool bags will if you take a high speed dig. anything with some weight to it should be strapped down or in some kind of secure lock box within the car(that is fastened down in some way of course) don't skimp out on the tie straps either. a good set will last a life time.

i know its been mentioned, but respirators! even when grinding, grinding disks are full of glue. bad bad bad stuff for your lungs. the pink 3M pucks are cheap, and work for when you are welding and anything else as long as it isnt chemicals that vaporize.

dowha Mon Feb 25, 2013 7:17 pm

Don't know if anyone else uses these...

Iíve been using these Siphons for years to drain gas tanks, fill up lawn mowers, my small tractor, and put Diesel in the Big Tractor (itís a pain in the butt to dump diesel from a 5 gal. can when the fuel filler is shoulder high)...

I also carry one in the "Cow Bug" instead of can of gas..

Fast, safe and easy way to drain or transfer fuel..

Self-priming pump, ideal for transferring fuel for boats and automobiles.
Anti-static feature lets you transfer fuel without danger of sparks.
1/2" diameter, 6' hose.

www.basspro.com/Bass-P.../10210534/

http://vimeo.com/59153676

cupcake Fri Jan 03, 2014 1:47 pm

LUG NUTS!
I see people posting pics of this and that and notice missing lugs. Not a good idea. And a super easy fix. Not only are you down by 20 or 25% with one missing you are stressing the others a lot. And throw those 40 or 50 year old rusty lug bolts away and install a set of quality studs and nuts.

Bad Hippie Sat Nov 01, 2014 12:03 pm

I second the secure your crap statement. In my last wreck in the Baja, I took a blow to the back of the head from, of all things, an important piece of safety equipment. The fire extinguisher.

It had been securly mounted to the roll cage (or so I thought) behind the drivers seat. When I came to, it was up front (after dinking me in the back of the head), having broken loose from its mount. In a bad wreck, crap will fly everywhere. Tools, parts, equipment, can and will become projectiles.

Make sure the items you carry are well secure. Heck, go overkill. Consider where items are located, to minimize the potential for injury should they break loose.

At the time of the wreck I was not off roading, at least before I ended up off the road. When I get the car back together, I will seriously look into getting a helmet as well.

Bad Hippie Sat Nov 01, 2014 12:04 pm

I second the secure your crap statement. In my last wreck in the Baja, I took a blow to the back of the head from, of all things, an important piece of safety equipment. The fire extinguisher.

It had been securly mounted to the roll cage (or so I thought) behind the drivers seat. When I came to, it was up front (after dinking me in the back of the head), having broken loose from its mount. In a bad wreck, crap will fly everywhere. Tools, parts, equipment, can and will become projectiles.

Make sure the items you carry are well secure. Heck, go overkill. Consider where items are located, to minimize the potential for injury should they break loose.

At the time of the wreck I was not off roading, at least before I ended up off the road. When I get the car back together, I will seriously look into getting a helmet as well.

oprn Fri Dec 25, 2020 7:03 am

I see nothing has been added here for a while, I just found this thread and want to add something personal that has been missed.

When working with or spraying catalyzed materials and paint, A RESPIRATOR IS NOT ADEQUATE!!! I cannot emphasize this enough! If you can smell the chemicals you are working with then you are not protected! A supplied air mask is the ONLY thing that will protect you properly. Period! Especially in enclosed areas without ventilation fans.

This applies to any and all two part catalyzed products, paint, body filler and fiberglass resins.

I spent over 10 years working in the autobody industry working with these chemicals and ended up in the hospital fighting for my very breath with lungs filling with fluid as fast as I could cough it up. I thought I was protected with a respirator but was informed by Occupational Health and Safety that it was not true. They were obviously correct!

Now many years later and a change in trades I am mostly OK but get pneumonia easily, wheeze a lot and have been assured by the doctors that emphysema is in my future in later years.

Don't short cut lung protection!



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