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coad Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:51 am

I'm on a kick to get rid of all my modern crap and replace them with tools from back when they were still made to last.

Here's my latest. About a 1941 Craftsman Drill Press. All cast iron, weighs a ton, and now that its cleaned up runs smooth as silk.








Motor was locked up because there was a wasp nest inside, but cleaned it up, repacked the bearings and now it runs like a champ. Even after I replace a couple bearings and give it a coat of paint I'm into it less than some junker from Harbor Freight.

What's anyone else have?

Rowroy Thu Jan 17, 2008 10:31 am

SWEET. Just wait until I get home . . . I've got LOTS of old tools (power and hand). Pics coming soon.

slowtwitch Thu Jan 17, 2008 2:08 pm

My neighbor gave me this lathe in pieces. It took a while to rebuild, but, it was worth it. I hooked up a VFD, to run the original 3 phase motor. It's a Logan 11", model 1925.




pete

helowrench Thu Jan 17, 2008 3:01 pm

I have a Ford wrench with the actual Ford Logo on it.

rob

Glenn Thu Jan 17, 2008 3:02 pm


azmodela Thu Jan 17, 2008 3:13 pm

helowrench wrote: I have a Ford wrench with the actual Ford Logo on it.

rob

Those are pretty common. They came in the tool roll when cars where new. It could be anywhere from 1920's to 1980's vintage.

coW Thu Jan 17, 2008 4:06 pm

I call myself not collecting tools but do find old woodworking tools follow me home when my wife insists on stopping at antique stores.

This is within grab range in my chair right now but have many more chisels, angle gauges, levels, yardsticks, planes, pliers, hammers, etc:

azmodela Thu Jan 17, 2008 6:09 pm

coad wrote: I'm on a kick to get rid of all my modern crap and replace them with tools from back when they were still made to last.

Here's my latest. About a 1941 Craftsman Drill Press. All cast iron, weighs a ton, and now that its cleaned up runs smooth as silk.




Motor was locked up because there was a wasp nest inside, but cleaned it up, repacked the bearings and now it runs like a champ. Even after I replace a couple bearings and give it a coat of paint I'm into it less than some junker from Harbor Freight.

What's anyone else have?

I've got a 1938 or 39 Delta Drill Press. Mine is about 6' tall though. Like yours, the best part is the spindle travel. Mine has an 8" plunge. The cheap ones available now usually have a 3-4" plunge.

Rowroy Thu Jan 17, 2008 7:20 pm

The first two are pipe wrenches - circa 1920. The last two are Stillson wrenches - circa 1890



Here is a 1940 Milwaukee 7" sander:



This is my 1938 Do-All bandsaw. She weighs in at just over 1800 lbs. It even has the job selector . . . just in case you need to know what blade speed to use when cutting asbestos or beryllium.




This is a 1945 Rockwell drill press:



Here is a 1950 Craftsman jointer. I managed to bring it back to life after it was in a house fire:



This is an early 1940's Mall Saw. My grandfather built his entire house with this thing. It still runs as smooth as silk:



coW Thu Jan 17, 2008 7:55 pm

Rowroy wrote: This is my 1938 Do-All bandsaw. She weighs in at just over 1800 lbs. It even has the job selector . . . just in case you need to know what blade speed to use when cutting asbestos or beryllium.





That^ is a sweet bandsaw! I would love to get one of those! Where'd you get it?? Is it 220 or three phase?

Btw, I have some of those same wrenches. Had no idea they were as old as they are..

crofty Thu Jan 17, 2008 8:10 pm



NOS 85.5 ring compressor, and 83mm and 77mm hazet RC's.
Bench crank stand
valve spring removal tool



This thing has been the best $15 i spent at a flea market!

Rowroy Thu Jan 17, 2008 8:14 pm

coW wrote: Rowroy wrote: This is my 1938 Do-All bandsaw. She weighs in at just over 1800 lbs. It even has the job selector . . . just in case you need to know what blade speed to use when cutting asbestos or beryllium.





That^ is a sweet bandsaw! I would love to get one of those! Where'd you get it?? Is it 220 or three phase?

Btw, I have some of those same wrenches. Had no idea they were as old as they are..

I got the bandsaw for free. I was an engineer at a porcelain plant that was shutting down. They gave all of their machine tools away to the employees . . . including 6 lathes, 3 milling machines, 2 drill presses, and a boat load of hand tools.

This particular bandsaw was 3-phase. However, I replaced the motor with a single-phase unit. The blade welder runs off of 220 single-phase, also.

============================================

The Stillson wrench was invented in 1876. Interestingly, the crescent wrench was invented 50 years EARLIER, but didn't catch on until the 1900's.

BigHerc Thu Jan 17, 2008 8:50 pm

man I have to take my camera to my shop, I have an old rockwell belt sander, weighs about 50-60 pounds, couple tables saws from the 50's, and a couple of post forming machines for heating up and bending formica, countertops from the 40's, also have an old vacumn press, but thats probably only from the late 60's early 70's, i'll post them up tomorrow :D

Culito Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:31 pm



I spent some time on one of these back in my college daze...

Smooth runnin' sombitch.

TristanM Fri Jan 18, 2008 12:49 pm

These were past down from my great-grandfather. First is the 1940's circa. Atlas drill press. This is such a great machine, and I really like the history of the Walker-Turner motors.



Then there's the bandsaw made by Power King also circa 1940ish..


And the beast that does all of my heavy woodwork, my Atlas table saw.


Today's tools on the market are no match for these, and I plan on keeping these in good shape to pass onto my son.

Cusser Fri Jan 18, 2008 2:10 pm

I don't have any obtained-used tools. But I've got my original Vise-grip and metal Stanley hammer from the early 1960s, my late 1960s 1/4 inch portable drill (metal case, yet), late 1960s soldering gun, 1970/1971 Penncraft (J.C. Penney) lifetime-warranty combination wrenches and toolbox.

helowrench Fri Jan 18, 2008 3:10 pm

Rowroy wrote: The first two are pipe wrenches - circa 1920. The last two are Stillson wrenches - circa 1890



My Ford wrench looks almost identical to the one on the Left
Rob

Da TOW'D Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm




I bought the contents of a shop that closed down--it was in business from 1948 to 1980
along with a shelf full of NOS VW stuff there were some nice used body parts- OG fenders doors hoods and trunk lids
and some interesting tools
Sun distributor tester
Sioux valve grinding equipment
Snap on pullers
Snap on VOM
some real old Motor Manuals and VW factory workshop manuals

The owner asked how much money I had on me at the time -thinking he was joking I said $50.

He said get this junk out of here today the building is coming down this weekend.
It took 2 VW bus loads plus a 3 ton van to move that gold
best score for me-- ever
hank

mustard_madman Fri Jan 18, 2008 10:57 pm

I can't say I have pictures, but I have an array of really old brass torches. The ones where you have the little lead cup in the front you light. They are pretty cool.

Rowroy Sat Jan 19, 2008 11:41 am

70 year old Starrett mic:



Starrett "Last Word" dial indicator from late '40's:



Misc. calipers from the 30's and 40's:



I don't know if anyone is an electronics geek like me, but here's a 1950 EICO o-scope. Still works, too . . .




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