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Kombi///M3 Tue Jun 14, 2011 7:17 pm

I like ur wheels.. what type are those?
I just installed weitec springs and the rear end is raked a bit..
maybe air would be the solution..
cheers.

240Gordy Tue Jun 14, 2011 7:23 pm

Prob not high enough for the lift and chair

I would look at the eurovan, it has an extremely "thin" floor profile in the rear hatch area, and the door is very tall

With a side door loader you could install a doka style bulkhead behind the front seats, and use the middle seat bolt holes for anchors for the chair.

If you get in a front end collision, the chair better be very secure or it is coming thru anyway

240Gordy Tue Jun 14, 2011 7:25 pm

Kombi///M3 wrote: I like ur wheels.. what type are those?
I just installed weitec springs and the rear end is raked a bit..
maybe air would be the solution..
cheers.

S class. Yup air would fix that rake. How close to the front tirrs are the fender edge?

Kombi///M3 Tue Jun 14, 2011 7:32 pm

front 1.5" and rear 2.5" not bad..I dont mind but I like your set up.
though I'm running stock steel wheels.still looking for a nice set..maybe 16".
thx.
Ogi

webwalker Tue Jun 14, 2011 7:41 pm

The chair has a latching mechanism on its platform; you drive it into the 'latch; and that's supposed to hold it in place even during an impact.

As I said, pop is a nuclear safety engineer: he wants a minimum of three levels of redundancy to most everything. Prior to getting the latch based loader, he had what I can only describe as a 'derrick' loader: literally motor driven engine hoist, but with nylon straps instead of a chain. Once inside the car, my Dad put his Coast Guard knot tying to work; he had woven a series of heavy nylon ropes into a custom netting that latched onto parts of the steel frame of the chair. These in turn were latched both to the cargo hooks in the floor, as well as oversized mount points he welded himself.

Not bad for a clever old beezer in a powered chair, huh?

I think you're right about the rear hatch, so either he's going to have to budge, or he's going to have to look elsewhere. But at least will have a solid answer.

thanks again,

M

canasync Tue Jun 14, 2011 8:06 pm

PaulGinAZ wrote:
If there is any interest I can take some pictures of everything in the next few days of the setup.


Just saw this post for the first time. Please do post some pics of your setup.

240Gordy Tue Jun 14, 2011 8:59 pm

canasync wrote: PaulGinAZ wrote:
If there is any interest I can take some pictures of everything in the next few days of the setup.


Just saw this post for the first time. Please do post some pics of your setup.

yes please post

silverbulletuk Wed Jun 15, 2011 5:54 am

SyncroGhia wrote: I love the idea of this on a Syncro as you could raise the suspension a lot for offroading but then having it sit a lot lower for on the road driving.

One question though... how do you guys know when you're at the preset height which you have to go back to for driving on the road? i.e. the level at which you set all the suspension settings at like camber, caster and toe. These change a lot on a Syncro so you'd need to know you were at the right heigh or your tyre wear would be terrible.

MG
Good point Mike. My old 2002 Allroad springs to mind (now my Dad's :wink: ) it has low, standard and high ride heights plus an extra-high that drops down over 20 mph IIRC. The total ride height variation is about 75-80mm.
Since it can be driven all day long at any speed at any of the 3 "normal" ride heights- ignoring the automatic high-speed lowering - wheel geometry variation can't be much of a factor.
The dampers are integral to the strut, but on the rear of a T3 this would mean coil-over structural modification. Up front on a syncro would possibly be a (relatively) easy exchange, length dependant.
Maybe on a syncro an adjustment to the steering rack height would be necessary and desireable, to put it in the mid-height neutral position. This would help to minimise bump-steer too.
Maybe time to go and measure some linkage lengths?

240Gordy Wed Jun 15, 2011 11:53 am

SyncroGhia wrote: . . .One question though... how do you guys know when you're at the preset height which you have to go back to for driving on the road? . . .

with sensors and a little electronic controller, available from all the air bag suppliers . . . can have multiple presets

ThorAlex Mon Jun 20, 2011 1:56 am

This is a tristar built in sweden:


Air ride, 1.8T, porche 996 tranmission and lots of other stuff done to it too.

Her's there website, lots of picks there:
http://vw-tristar.web.surftown.se/vw-tristar5.htm

rmcd Tue Jun 21, 2011 1:11 pm

Here is another approach for the front. Not sure there is enough room.

http://www.forjworks.com/Blog/Default.aspx?postid=de41e0b9-052c-4bbe-a338-cd9a38eed3cf

240Gordy Tue Jun 21, 2011 4:34 pm

rmcd wrote: Here is another approach for the front. Not sure there is enough room.

http://www.forjworks.com/Blog/Default.aspx?postid=de41e0b9-052c-4bbe-a338-cd9a38eed3cf

The universal aero bag is indeed promising, you could use it on the syncro,
But you need to fab a flat spring perch for it to replace the spring contoured surface. You need to make sure the shock tube not larger than the hole in the middle of the bag. Check the price of the bags while you are at it.

foodeater Tue Jun 21, 2011 4:59 pm

webwalker wrote: The chair has a latching mechanism on its platform; you drive it into the 'latch; and that's supposed to hold it in place even during an impact.

As I said, pop is a nuclear safety engineer: he wants a minimum of three levels of redundancy to most everything. Prior to getting the latch based loader, he had what I can only describe as a 'derrick' loader: literally motor driven engine hoist, but with nylon straps instead of a chain. Once inside the car, my Dad put his Coast Guard knot tying to work; he had woven a series of heavy nylon ropes into a custom netting that latched onto parts of the steel frame of the chair. These in turn were latched both to the cargo hooks in the floor, as well as oversized mount points he welded himself.

Not bad for a clever old beezer in a powered chair, huh?

I think you're right about the rear hatch, so either he's going to have to budge, or he's going to have to look elsewhere. But at least will have a solid answer.

thanks again,

M


I've seen several Vanagons with a wheelchair lift inside the side door. I dont know if that will work for your dad but it is an option worth considering. They have all had the middle seat removed, but the rear was still inplace.

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