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Jack_O_Trades Thu Jan 24, 2019 7:49 am

asiab3 wrote: GREAT progress!! =D>

It takes a few doze miles or so for my brushes to break in and stop arcing as much. I have the curse of a worn commutator though, so I chamfer my brushes… What did you cut your comm down to? I have a 38a that's .020" past the wear limit, but a lathe might do the trick there…

Where did you get the side reflectors? My paint shop deleted them in 2010-ish, and I want them more and more as I daily my bus…

Robbie

Thanks,

On the commutator wear limit, I thought it was on the order of having the grooves .1mm bellow the surface of the copper. If that is not correct, what is the wear limit?

In my case, the groove are about 1-.5mm deep (just eyeballing).

I bought the reflectors probably 3 years ago, so I'm not certain. But I think I picked them up from EIS.

https://www.eisparts.com/side-reflector-with-base-gasket-amberfront-bus-68-69.html

https://www.eisparts.com/side-reflectorwith-base-gasketred-rear-bus-68-69.html


I do like the quality. However, In your case you may have issues. The problem with welding in holes is it's a bitch to drill them back out. The filler material is harder than the surrouding material. Typically too hard for a convential HSS drill bit. and if you do get a hole started, typically the bit will jump off to the surrounding material. I had this very same issue with my emblem on the nose. I had filled in the holes and had a hell of a time redrilling them. I ended up with some less than round holes. If you do go the route of drillig holes, you might consider slightly shifting them off of the welded in holes.


I don't know if I buy into the automotive tape, the reflectors consist of three parts: screw, reflector, rubber backing. And don't molding and trim pieces that use the foam double sideded tape usually have receses to make up for the thickness of the tape?

advCo Thu Jan 24, 2019 8:58 am

Great work so far, man. Paint work looks awesome. I really dig the green.

Sure nice having a lathe to be able to turn those little bits you need to get stuff done. I'm lucky enough to have a few machinist friends who I can bribe into turning small parts for me. Great attention to detail, can't wait to see this one come together.

TomWesty Thu Jan 24, 2019 11:47 am

wcfvw69 wrote: asiab3 wrote: TomWesty wrote: asiab3 wrote:
Where did you get the side reflectors? Doesn’t Wolfsburg West have them?

I didn't see them on the WW site until you mentioned it. But they're out of stock ;)

There is a dude in San Diego selling them, but I am unsure of the quality, and $180 plus shipping and drilling holes in my bus is a lot to gamble on… (Yeah the paint shop welded my reflector holes shut, so I won't be drilling new holes without a REALLY good reproduction…)

RobbieOrangePeelMobile



I wouldn't drill holes personally. I'd used the 3M super strong double sided tape that's thin. I bought a roll when Busdaddy recommended it. Many auto manufactures now use it to apply moldings, etc. You could simply cut the screw threads off and use a dab of epoxy to hold the screw in place so it looks screwed in. CIP1 has the reflectors.

Jack_O_Trades Fri Jan 25, 2019 10:58 pm

advCo wrote: Great work so far, man. Paint work looks awesome. I really dig the green.

Sure nice having a lathe to be able to turn those little bits you need to get stuff done. I'm lucky enough to have a few machinist friends who I can bribe into turning small parts for me. Great attention to detail, can't wait to see this one come together.

Thanks! It is certainly nice have the equipment to make parts if needed.

Sanding, Sanding, and more Sanding. I am almost finished with the cargo area. I should be able to wrap this up this weekend and start cleaning and prepping for spraying.







For a while, I have been hunting for a sliding door trim piece. I don't like the idea of people traipsing across the painted threshold and this will be a high wear area. I have had my eye on a stainless sliding door trim piece from Van Wurks in the UK.

https://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?p=7684159

I was hesitant because they don't ship to the US. But I finally pulled the trigger and had it shipped to a mail forwarding company and then shipped to me. Total cost of shipping was very reasonable. I had two these pieces shipped and it was around $45 for shipping and I received the parts in about a week.

https://www.forward2me.com

I will be using thier services again to order some stuff from Custom Commercial. CC has some parts that are not available in the US and thier not very good about shipping to the US.

Van Wurks offers the trim strip in both plain stainless (guaranteed to add 5hp to your bus) and an LED illuminated trim piece. I ordered one of each.

Here is the plain-jane trim piece. It's a nice looking piece and should outlast the bus.





Here is the illuminated trim piece. The problem with this piece is that it is tall. It would require a floor that is 1.25" thick to fill the gap. If I actually put in a floor this thick I think it would cause problems like blocking off the front walkthrough heater vents and interference with the interior panels. This trim piece is made in two pieces. I think I can remove the light strip and mount it to the normal trim piece. I will also need to come up with a door trigger to activate the light.







When I get tired of sanding, I hop onto the sandblasting cabinet and tackle a couple of parts here and there. I finished the tin and pulley for the generator. For the pulley, I masked off the area where the belt would ride as it would ultimately wear off the powder coat. I also cleaned up the voltage regulator. I have yet to test this out. I did pick up the newer solid state regulator in case there are issues with the original







I also cleaned up the generator pedestal and lapped the sealing surfaces. This is a VW part but the casting is pretty crappy. Could be corrosion or could be inclusions in the casting. Either way, I didn't want to remove too much material in lapping so I lapped until I had a continuous annular sealing surface that was free of radial scratches. I did this for both the base surface and the oil filler surface.







A couple of other bits that have been stripped and recoated. I do have an oil filler installed but its the version with the shorter breather tube and no dogleg. I believe the one with the dogleg is correct for the busses. I also stripped and powder coated the trim piece for the front walkthrough heater vents.








Jack_O_Trades Sun Jan 27, 2019 3:21 am

I was able to spend most of today in the shop. However, I had to take care of some shop maintenance before working on the bus. I have a decent sized air dryer for my compressor but I started to get moisture in my airlines. I went to check out my dryer and it was saturated. It's basically a big-ass silica (about 1 gal size) desiccant bag in a metal chamber. So I took apart the dryer, pulled the bag and baked it for a couple of hours to liberate the water. I also took the time to drain my compressor (80 gal tank) and drained off about 2 gal of water. I guess it's been awhile.

I had some new shop lights come in so I replaced those. I swapped out the fluorescent bulbs with 5000K LED tubes. What a world of difference it makes!

I then spent some time cleaning up the blast cabinet and replacing the pitted window.

After all that, I finally got to spend some time on the bus and blasting parts in the blast cabinet.

Bus work was sanding and making slow progress. A couple of side projects that I dinked around on included looking at the vent windows. Including the fronts, I have five to rebuild. Last year I took apart the sliding door vent window and started cleaning up the parts. Today I finished blasting the frame and got it powder coated. I also powder coated the passenger seat bracket. I think the sliding door vent window is almost ready to go back together. I will have to machine the upper pivot (original from aluminum) because I believe I drilled it out when I took it apart. It gets swaged in, so it shouldn't be too difficult to replace.

For disassembly, I think the only tricky part is getting the vent frame out from the larger frame. You can either drill out the rivets for the larger frame veritical piece and spread it or you can squeeze the vent frame to get the upper pin out first. Once the upper pivot is free you can then slide the lower pivot in the slot and pull the vent frame free from the larger frame.





I also took apart the left rear vent window so I could refresh my memory of how the assembly was constructed



























The vent window assembly doesn't seem as complicated as I remembered And I look forward to being able to knock out these windows over the next week or two. I have yet to look at the front door vents, but they do look a bit more complecated.

My fuel sender has been out of the tank, sitting around for about a year now. I wanted to bench test it just to make sure the contacts hadn't oxidized and affected the performance.

I used two methods to test this. The first was with a DMM. Here you can see the resistance for full (2.6 ohms) and empty (83.2 ohms).





I also wanted to test it, hooked up to my fuel gauge. I connected the gauge to a 12V battery. And then, connected the sender to the gauge.







Here is the sender in the empty position



Here is the sender in the full position



And here is a quick video showing it in action


wcfvw69 Sun Jan 27, 2019 5:19 am

A suggestion. Since you have the sender in your hand, do the ground modification on it while its out. There's a thread or threads on how to do it in the Bay forums.

BTW, I tested my brand new Brazilian made OE VDO sender on the bench like you did. The fuel gauge was accurate. The ohm range was also perfect.

When the sender was installed in the tank and everything hooked up, the fuel gauge only moves to 3/4 of a tank when full. :?

I was not happy and haven't figured out why yet.

Jack_O_Trades Tue Jan 29, 2019 1:17 am

wcfvw69 wrote: A suggestion. Since you have the sender in your hand, do the ground modification on it while its out. There's a thread or threads on how to do it in the Bay forums.

BTW, I tested my brand new Brazilian made OE VDO sender on the bench like you did. The fuel gauge was accurate. The ohm range was also perfect.

When the sender was installed in the tank and everything hooked up, the fuel gauge only moves to 3/4 of a tank when full. :?

I was not happy and haven't figured out why yet.

Hi Bill,

Thanks for the heads up. I will keep this in mind when get everything installed.

For your issues, there are three causes I can think of. Electrical, Mechanical, Thermal. I would start with electrical. The fact that your gauge only indicates 3/4 tank suggests you have too much resitance from the gage to the sender, to ground. Probably due to a coroded terminal on one of the wires or a bad ground connection. If you have a DMM, try to measure for a potential between your two grounds (sender and gauge). Or measure the resistance at the sender with it installed and at the gauge.

Jack_O_Trades Sat Feb 02, 2019 11:22 pm

Last weekend I finished up restoring one of the rear vent windows. I powder coated the larger frame and then it was onto the glass frame to finish it up. I don't know why but I had drilled out the upper aluminum pivot (maybe to get it out of the frame). So I had to machine a new pin and swage/rivet it in.

Here is the frame with the missing pin, vs another frame with the original pin.



Here is the newly machined pin installed to the frame. I picked up an air-riveter just for working on these frames. They are typically used for aircraft work. It's been a dream to use. The anvils are too fat to get into the groove of the frame so I had to get creative.





Next up was to install the latch. I used flush head rivets. The anvils on my riveter are concave so it results in a convex finish on the rivet.





And the finished window frame ready to be installed into the larger frame, except not! Notice I forgot to install the Deluxe trim piece in the lower corner. Assembling the glass to the frame with the rubber is childs-play compared to trying to remove the glass with fresh rubber. Once I was able to remove the glass, I dropped in the trim piece and reinstalled the glass with new rubber. I installed the rubber dry. I wanted to avoid lube because I have heard stories of the glass slowly sliding out after installation with lube.



I installed the rubber following the process from Airhead Parts and a very helpful youtube video.



In the process of installing the glass to the frame, the knob on latch popped off. These are repop latches and I am second guessing my choice in using them. The knob is simply swaged on and not very well. The OEM VW knobs are screwed in with a sheet metal screw (still not ideal). Since I was this far along with the glass frame I decided to keep the latch and fix it. I wanted to do as VW intended and use a screw to hold the know on. My improvement though was to use a machine screw. I drilled and tapped for an M3 flat head screw and it worked out perfectly.







The next step was to install the rubber seal to the frame. At this point, the frame is still in two pieces. Installing the rubber is pretty straight forward. The rubber is designed to be used on either the right or left side of the bus. This means that you have to make slots in the rubber for the various tabs that help keep the window in the window opening on the bus.





My initial attempt at this window assembly was with rubber from CIP1 that I purchased in 2015. Fit and finish were questionable at best. And, with the window installed, I had large enough gaps in the corners between the seal and the bus window opening to bug me.

I picked up some new rubber from CIP1 (German quality), West Coast Metric, and Wolfsburg West. I was hoping the CIP1 would be different but it was the same as when I purchased it 3-4 years ago. The WW rubber looks pretty good, has additional features missing from the CIP1 version, but is lacking some detail that is found on the WCM version. I am going to try the WCM version and see how it does. At the end of this, I should be an expert at rebuilding these vent windows. I will try to get some photos of the subtle differences in these choices of rubber.

With the rubber installed, the next step is to install the glass frame to the larger frame. First, the lower pivot is inserted. Then, the frame is stretched open to allow the upper pin to be inserted into the hole. It's a little tricky because the pin tends to try to drag the rubber seal through the hole.





With the glass frame installed, It's time to rivet the vertical member back in. This is pretty straight forward with my nifty riveter. With vertical member back in place, the rubber then gets installed into the groove on this part. This is pretty straight forward with the help of some plastic panel tools.





And the almost finished assembly. I didn't take any photos of it installed. I have since removed it and will be taking it apart to install the WCM window seal.


Jack_O_Trades Sat Feb 02, 2019 11:56 pm

I spent the past week really focusing on preparing to paint the interior. Originally I wasn't planning on painting the inside nose but once I pulled the wiring harness I realize a lot of the paint was damage from the front end collision that I repaired on the outside and I need to address this as well as some surface rust. I then decided I would paint everything. I don't know why. I seem to be reluctant about these kinds of decisions when it's clearly the right thing to do. And then I'll obsess of trivial details that no one will ever see.

Based on my previous experiences with painting in my garage, I made some changes to my methods. Since I was painting the interior and blending into the window and door frames I decided to mask up the bus inside and out covering everything I didn't want to have overspray on. This took forever. In hindsight. I should have just painted the bus inside and out in one shot and eliminate all the masking work and the need to blend new paint into old paint. For the window openings. I first masked just outside opening. I wanted to the paint to blend into the outside of the lip. I then masked the entire outside of the bus.













This project is brought to you by 3M



This time, to minimize the overspray from getting on all my crap I hung some visqueen, creating basically a paint booth. Though my intent was to minimize overspray this also helped in reducing the smells propagating to the house to almost nothing. When I spray in the garage, I have a bank of four fans that fit the rear door sucking out air and a bank of four fans moves air from the house and into the garage. Obviously, there are issues with spraying in your attached garage but I think I have addressed most of them at this point. I also preheat the garage the night before and run the dehumidifier. Today I was working in a toasty dry garage at 77 deg and %45 rel humidity.









I got the first coat of epoxy primer down. It went OK. I was having issues with the needle on my gun being sticky the resulted in the paint dripping from the nozzle after releasing the trigger. I didn't resolve this til halfway through the cargo area. I also had an issue with finding a pocket of dust/debris and spraying it all over the rear luggage area. These mistakes can be sanded out before the next coat. I am planning on doing 3 coats of epoxy primer and straight to single stage color. I was going to do urethane build primer but I don't see a need for this as I don't plan on doing any block sanding. Maybe someone can chime in on this decision.

There is something to be said about fresh paint, even if it's just primer that gets me excited about finishing this project.












Jack_O_Trades Sun Feb 03, 2019 12:02 am

Forgot to add that I am getting excited and started looking around for some baywindow t-shirts. I found this one on Etsy that seemed cool.


wcfvw69 Sun Feb 03, 2019 6:58 am

Nice job. I'm really enjoying this thread and your strong attention to the details. I bought the Cip-1 vent wing seal for the front doors. It's marked OEM VW of Brazil. It fit beautifully and I couldn't be happier.

I'd like to see some photos of the riveting tools you used. Your results look factory and correct.

I currently have my drivers side rear vent wing apart to restore it. I had to drill out one of the rivets the separate the window apart.

SamboSamba22 Sun Feb 03, 2019 9:08 am

wcfvw69 wrote: Nice job. I'm really enjoying this thread and your strong attention to the details. I bought the Cip-1 vent wing seal for the front doors. It's marked OEM VW of Brazil. It fit beautifully and I couldn't be happier.

I'd like to see some photos of the riveting tools you used. Your results look factory and correct.

I currently have my drivers side rear vent wing apart to restore it. I had to drill out one of the rivets the separate the window apart.
Those reworked vent windows are some of the best I’ve seen.

busdaddy Sun Feb 03, 2019 11:07 am

I agree, nice to see I'm not the only one who suffers from OCD and goes the extra mile to do a job like vent windows right even if it becomes a career.

Looking good!

Jack_O_Trades Thu Feb 07, 2019 12:08 am

wcfvw69 wrote: Nice job. I'm really enjoying this thread and your strong attention to the details. I bought the Cip-1 vent wing seal for the front doors. It's marked OEM VW of Brazil. It fit beautifully and I couldn't be happier.

I'd like to see some photos of the riveting tools you used. Your results look factory and correct.

I currently have my driver's side rear vent wing apart to restore it. I had to drill out one of the rivets the separate the window apart.

Thanks! coming from you, that means a lot. The work you've done on your bus has inspired me to do better in the work I do on my bus.

I saw that you had recommended the Brazil seals but when I went to CIP1 there are not available at the moment.

I will have to get you some better photos of the tools and setups I'm using for riveting the frames together.

Jack_O_Trades Thu Feb 07, 2019 12:12 am

SamboSamba22 wrote: Those reworked vent windows are some of the best I’ve seen.

busdaddy wrote: I agree, nice to see I'm not the only one who suffers from OCD and goes the extra mile to do a job like vent windows right even if it becomes a career.

Looking good!

Thanks for the kind words.

I do enjoy the details and I don't mind obsessing over them. But I have to be careful to stop letting it cause delays to get the bus back on the road. Things like windows I don't so much mind because I'm not going to want to have to pull them out again to clean up.

Jack_O_Trades Sun Feb 17, 2019 11:42 pm

I am continuing to make excellent progress. I have to keep it up to get rolling by summer.

I guess I will try to do this chronologically. I left off having epoxy primered the interior and rebuilt one of the vent windows. I put down a couple more coats of primer and then some single stage. It came Out OK but I had a lot of dust which I am working through. Painting the interior was a PITA because I had to climb in to spray. I tried to do it in zones but the overspray was picking up debris from my Tyvek suit.

At a minimum, the visible areas look good. The cargo floor looks like shit but I can fix it later on.

I also spent the last week cleaning up the paint seams from outside to inside. Most openings were easy to hide because I made the seam inside of the window/door seal area. This was kind of impossible with the front doors because the seal is on the door and not the frame. But I figured it out and everything is mostly blended. I also resprayed the nose because of some paint repairs and burn through trying to clean up the orange peal. With the bodywork done, everything in single stage, I find it easier to just scuff the paint and repaint the whole panel vs trying to do a small section and get it to blend with the rest. I suck at painting so I do what I can and it's usually not elegant.

Here the front door jambs are getting painted again to blend in the seams and the nose is getting a fresh coat of paint.





Here you can see the interior painted. I have already started to drag down my bins of parts and getting ready to assemble. I am trying to give the paint a good month to cure so it can get hard. I find it is susceptible to damage otherwise. I don't care too much about the cargo floors at the moment since they will need to be cleaned up from all the dust nibs. Now that the bus is very clean and relatively dirt free (not including the undercarriage) I am trying to keep it that way with the cover. I am also trying to prevent damage to the paint from working around the vehicle.













With the interior paint finished. I moved onto the engine bay. When I did the interior, I thought that was hard. However, despite being a small area to paint, there were many nooks and crannies to try and get my spray gun into making the engine bay one of the more difficult paint challenges. . I used a full sized gun and should have probably opted for something smaller and more compact. Since I'm not concerned with "bodywork" for the interior and engine bay, I am spraying 3-4 coats of epoxy primer and 3-4 coats of single stage. I am skipping the urethane build primer.

Here the engine bay is ready for primer.







Done up in some nice gray primer. I was very tempted to leave it this color because of the great visibility.







And in color. It's really dark, and I know that it will make working in the engine bay difficult with visibility but I intend to put up some tasteful LED ribbon lighting on the roof to improve upon this. What can you do, it's the factory color.







I am really trying to get past the paint stage of this project. There were a handful of parts that needed to get painted per the original finish of the part. And here they are ready for primer.



The heater tree



Fuel tank straps



Heater ducts to the doors (Deluxe models only)



This is a rear seat heat transition piece. I have the vents but only one of these pieces. I believe this is the left one and I need the right one. I don't know what they are called so if someone has info, let me know. I might post in the stupid questions asking for this part.



The jack clamping strap under the passenger seat



And my fuel sender access port. It was originally powder coated green but I decided to match it to the factory paint



And my m-plate. I don't think I ever ran this through the auto decoder and now I guess the decoder is down. I've manually decoded it at one time or another. The only thing I don't understand is the date code (15 4E). I haven't seen anything that describes what a letter means in the date code.



Parts done-up in primer.



This is SPI epoxy primer and must stay above 65 for the first 24 hrs after spraying to cure properly. I try to keep the parts above 70 for the first 24 hr window.



I rolled up the paint booth for the day to do other work and put the parts next to the heater for that first 24 hr.



I should be able to get these parts into color tomorrow. After that, I will need to fix the paint on the roof of the bus. and a couple of chips in the paint on the rear of the bus. Then I am mostly done with paint.

Jack_O_Trades Mon Feb 18, 2019 12:55 am

Last week I ran into a problem with my engine. This engine only has 217 miles on it and was still being broken in. All the parts were new with the exception of a tired worn case.

At one point I started bead blasting the bus to remove the paint and it got everywhere, including the engine. I was worried about the glass dust getting inside the engine, so I started tearing it down to the long block to clean up everything.

At some point, I decided to measure the endplay and noticed that it was excessive. I started working to remove the endplay but couldn't. I could get the flywheel to lock-up to the #1 main bearing and then I could feel that bearing move in the journals. With the flywheel locked-up, I was still getting .005 - .008" of endplay and 3 deg of rotation. This told me that the bearing was too loose. So this prompted me to completely tear apart the engine.

Upon a complete teardown, I discovered a failed #2 cam bearing (unrelated to the endplay issue). I also found bearing damage in the main bearings, #1 cam bearing, and a couple of rod bearings. The journals on these components seem OK though.







Here is the #1 main bearing with the dowel pin wallowed out.



I believe the #2 cam bearing to be the point of origin for all the bearing damage to the engine. I think shrapnel from this bearing made it to the other bearings.

Interestingly enough, the rockers and rocker shafts seem OK.





I measured the cam bearing journals and they seem oversized. I say seem because There are no specs in the Bently for this feature. They only have a spec on the cam bearing ID .9838 - .9842 leaving .002" clearance for the bearing journal would put those at .9818 - .9822

I measured the cam bearing journals from this engine and they seemed oversized based on the above numbers with #2 being the worst.

#1



#2



#3



This is the only info I have to go on as I didn't do much measuring on these bearings when I first assembled it (my mistake). I just kind of threw it together and went on feel.

At this point, I decided to build up a new short block with all new internals and a new engine case. I would reuse my heads, P&C's as these looked fine with no damage.

Why do one when you can do two for twice a much. I ordered a VW Brazil AS41 magnesium case and an Autolinea AS41 style aluminum bubble-top case. Both configured for 85.5 P&C's for a 1600 engine build.

Both showed up this week.

Here they are side by side. The Autolinea is a beast and at more than 41 lbs weighs %60 more than the VW case at 25 lbs.







VW case



Autolinea case



So now I have a game plan for three engine builds.

I am going to build the new VW case into a stock-ish 1600 DP engine for the bus focusing on reliability and building the best that I can with my total experience of 1 failed engine build (I may learn from my mistakes).

I found an air-cooled shop in Hayward that can line bore and thrust cut my old case and provide the matching bearings for a reasonable price. I will get this case fixed and build it up as a bench test engine for testing ancillary hardware (carbs, fuel pumps, distributors, etc..) and have it as a spare for the bus.

I want to do a third build with the Autolinea case. Maybe some big displacement beast 1915 or whatever (haven't thought about it really). I do have some heads and pistons from a larger engine that my buddy gave me but I need to do my research.

But first, I need to get an engine for my bus. So, onto the case.







This case will have the following mods,

-Replace oil galley plugs with drilled and tapped brass plugs
-Full-flow with external oil filter
-Bob Hoovers HVX mods for better oil circulation through the right half of the engine case, and the heads

The first step was to remove the oil galley plugs. I used a 1/8 drill bit and a slide hammer equipped with a spax screw.

Drill hole, screw in screw, slide-hammer out the plug, repeat.







This plug is special because it throttles the oil flow to the #4 main bearing ensuring there is enough pressure to the other oil gallies. I will touch on this later as to what I replaced it with.





Total of 12 plugs pulled. There is a massive one in the rear of the case that could get pulled but it's not part of the oil galley and sits above the oil level in the engine.


Jack_O_Trades Mon Feb 18, 2019 1:58 am

Today I was able to put about 9 hours into the working on the new engine case. With the oil galley plugs pulled, it was time to drill, tap and machine for the full-flow mod, HVX mods, and oil galley plugs.

It's interesting to get my hands on a brand new case. There are things like the Helicoil inserts for the mustache bar that I assumed were not OEM because of how poorly they were executed. I like to install Helicoils about 1/2 to 1 full turn below the surface. This ensures that the first thread that the Helicoil engages is full and you get the full strength of that thread and not pull out the Helicoil. As such, the thread inserts, in this case, were a bit proud. Lucky for me, the tang for the insert had not been punched out so I could further insert the coil.

Here you can see the insert is just barely below the surface.



Using the fancy installation tool, we can screw this insert 1/2 a turn below the surface. These inserts only go in and can't back out without destroying them so be careful not to go too far.



Just right



This case came with an extra machined stepped hole which I have no idea what it's for but it will need to be plugged as it lets air in/out of the engine bay. Does anyone know what this is for?





Here is my original case with the boss but no machined features



Another nice feature is this pressed in thread insert behind #3 cylinder. my engine uses a nut and is a bitch to get to with the doghouse in the way. Say goodbye to that nut. Hopefully, this insert never spins because that would be a nightmare.



The first mod is part of the HVX mod and that is to extend the right case oil galley through the lifters and cam bearing saddles to the #3 bearing. This requires using a 12" long 7/32 drill bit and measuring about a dozen times that you have enough material in your brand new engine case and won't drill through the outer wall.

First, check the depth of the oil galley hole



Then make sure the pocket your drilling through is not too deep. If it is then you can't drill. Here it looks like I have about 1/4" of wall/margin.



Insert the drill bit until it comes to the wall of the lifter bore and measure how deep you need to drill



Mark this measurement on the portion of the drill bit that is still sticking out of the case. This is your depth stop.



And proceed to drill up to your depth stop.





You will then need to drill the #3 saddle through to the long hole that was just extended. These two holes should intersect. There was already a largish deep hole and I extended it with a 7/32 drill bit. Here you can make out the drill at the bottom of the hole. Make sure the drill bit is not inserted when you are drilling the intersecting hole.



The next mod to the case was for full-flow. This port is the inlet from the external fuel filter to the engine oil gallies.

With the case on the mill. I located the center of the port using a chamfering tool. It is crude but faster than an indicator and accurate to a couple of thou.





I would then ream and tap initially for a 3/8 NPT fitting. These staggered tooth NPT taps are really nice for removing material and a lot easier to tap than conventional taps. They do need a bit of support otherwise they can go wonky. I used a centering tool to center the reamer/tap. At this point, I only wanted to tap deep enough to get my fitting started. I ultimately need to machine a clearance for an elbow fitting. An elbow fitting is required here because anything else would hit the mustache bar.



Once I could get a fitting started, it was onto clearancing for the elbow fitting using a boring tool.





With the clearance provided I could then finish tapping. It's important for all these tapped holes that they are not too deep. For many of them, If you go too deep you will block off intersecting oil gallies. I used my quill DRO to dial in the depth of the tapped hole to within .010"







With the case on the mill, I decided to tackle all the tapped plug holes on the rear of the case. The next one was the large 1/2" NPT for the oil temp sender. It's argued this is the best location because it's right before the oil pump which then goes through the oil filter and onto the cooler and the oil is probably at it's hottest here. I suppose you could put the sender along with the galley on it's the way to the cooler but it probably already cooled off going through the oil filter. We really do want to know the hottest temp of the oil to know if we're having problems. This fitting has to be installed as close as possible otherwise the sender will interfere with the mustache bar. Do you see the recurring theme here?





Another plug



Then there is this guy. The special throttling plug.





I didn't want to lose it's functionality so I set out to replicate it. But you can't buy plugs like this so I made one from scratch. I turned it on the lathe and used a 1/16 NPT die to cut the threads. I then used a special tool to broach the hex.





A couple of years ago I used to make custom tools including what I argued were the best precision metric hex drivers. The tips of these drivers are made from precision ground drill blanks and are very hard and sharp. As a driver, this is important because they will never go dull and will not round out your screw heads as a result of being dull. A nice side benefit is that I can use and have used them for broaching hexes in custom soft metal hardware that I have made over the years.





And with that, we conclude the mods to the rear of the engine case.

Spike0180 Tue Feb 19, 2019 10:11 am

Awesome write up. Thank you, those are some cool mods. And I know the rear plugs are known to blow out, but why replace all of the others? Just for peace of mind?

Jack_O_Trades Tue Feb 19, 2019 4:23 pm

Spike0180 wrote: Awesome write up. Thank you, those are some cool mods. And I know the rear plugs are known to blow out, but why replace all of the others? Just for peace of mind?


Thanks!

I pulled all of them mostly for peace of mind but it also allows you to inspect and fully clean out the oil passages from dirt, metal chips, etc... most of which can get trapped at the plugs as you try to blow things out.

Without being able to sight down the gallies you just don't know how clean things are.



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