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busdaddy Thu Aug 21, 2014 3:11 pm

I usually try to at least get it started for a minute or two even using a remote fuel supply just to listen for clatters and knocks but there may be mouse nests in the cooling system so have a fire extinguisher and hose ready. If it's been dormant that long you'll want to pull the engine and likely pull the heads to replace the pushrod tube seals and look inside, maybe some rings while you are in there too? the main seal on the flywheel end should also be replaced, check for endplay before dismantling, if it's huge you may want to go deeper inside first.

jakokombi Thu Aug 21, 2014 4:31 pm

Brian wrote: Once you gain more appreciation for busses, you'll want to keep it stock.

Clean it up, remove anything non-stock and take it to a VW event. Watch guys crawl all
over it, drooling over the most original early bay they've ever seen.
Then buy something more needy to plan a restoration on.

Bala Fri Aug 22, 2014 9:11 am

Nice bus.
I like stock.
Do what you want.
:D

Jack_O_Trades Sat Aug 23, 2014 9:12 am

Thanks again for the feedback

To clarify, I was able to drive the bus from my in-laws to my house (about 2 miles) though it did die on me twice.

Last night I threw on the tack and timing light and was dinking around under the bus and had a couple of questions...

1. When I fire up the engine, it will run 5 - 10 minutes I have it idling at about 1300 RPM. then it just dies. I usually have to wait a couple of minutes for it to start back up. There is fuel in the filter so I don't think it's starving for fuel, also when it dies, it just kind of peters out (does rev up like you would expect of a starved motor just before it dies). To me this seems like flooding but I don't know. I guess there could be any number of things associated with this right?

2. Can you remove the valve covers without taking off the heat exchangers? It seems like there is interference when I tried to take off the covers but wasn't sure how much I should wrestle with this.

Thanks

Jody '71 Sat Aug 23, 2014 9:31 am

Sounds like your tank is full of crud and the tank strainer clogs up. Removing the tank requires removing the engine first. A quicker fix but not permanent would be to drain the tank out, take off the tank outlet and install a new strainer with a new gasket. While you're at it, install new fuel line and locate your fuel filter between the outlet and the metal line coming out of the front of the engine tin under there. There may be one there already so replace that if so. Then put a solid line of fuel hose from the pump to the carb. Those little plastic fuel filters sitting on top of your distb can be dangerous if they leak or rupture.
Also ponder all new rubber brake lines.

Nice Bus!!!!!!! Have fun with it!!! Watch your youngsters inside the cab, you don't wanna come out and find your turn signal lever broken!!!!! They're fun things to move around at that age :wink: !!!!!

mranker Sat Aug 23, 2014 9:47 am

Jack_O_Trades wrote:

2. Can you remove the valve covers without taking off the heat exchangers? It seems like there is interference when I tried to take off the covers but wasn't sure how much I should wrestle with this.

Thanks

Yes. It can be fiddly but they are supposed to come off pretty easily once you pull off the retaining wire. Nice bus. I have to say quite a few of us are suffering from serious bus envy.

Jack_O_Trades Sat Aug 23, 2014 10:08 am

Jody '71 wrote: Sounds like your tank is full of crud and the tank strainer clogs up. Removing the tank requires removing the engine first. A quicker fix but not permanent would be to drain the tank out, take off the tank outlet and install a new strainer with a new gasket. While you're at it, install new fuel line and locate your fuel filter between the outlet and the metal line coming out of the front of the engine tin under there. There may be one there already so replace that if so. Then put a solid line of fuel hose from the pump to the carb. Those little plastic fuel filters sitting on top of your distb can be dangerous if they leak or rupture.
Also ponder all new rubber brake lines.

Nice Bus!!!!!!! Have fun with it!!! Watch your youngsters inside the cab, you don't wanna come out and find your turn signal lever broken!!!!! They're fun things to move around at that age :wink: !!!!!

Thanks for the tips,

The tank is definitely full of crud. I guess I should just go ahead and pull everything (engine, tank, trans) and get things done right. It's seems pointless to chase these problems when there are too many variables (fixes) that need to be taken care of first.

On the turn signal, the box that houses the switch and clamps to the column rotates pretty freely, Is it supposed to do this or should it be solid?

I'm guessing solid...

The more I hear about bus envy, the more I am inclined to keep it stock. As I go through the bus and find aging/cracked plastic/rubber parts is it better to replace the parts or try to not disturb them? I am mostly referring to interior parts. like the ducts on the doors and the various plastic bits and bobs.

busdaddy Sat Aug 23, 2014 10:08 am

Jack_O_Trades wrote: 1. When I fire up the engine, it will run 5 - 10 minutes I have it idling at about 1300 RPM. then it just dies. I usually have to wait a couple of minutes for it to start back up. There is fuel in the filter so I don't think it's starving for fuel, also when it dies, it just kind of peters out (does rev up like you would expect of a starved motor just before it dies). To me this seems like flooding but I don't know. I guess there could be any number of things associated with this right?
Next time it dies pour a spoonfull of gas down the carb throat and see if it tries to start, if it doesn't it's flooded, if it does it's starvation.

Brian Sat Aug 23, 2014 1:07 pm

mranker wrote: ...suffering from serious bus envy.

A lot.

Jack_O_Trades wrote: On the turn signal, the box that houses the switch and clamps to the column rotates pretty freely, Is it supposed to do this or should it be solid?

Solid, there are only two screws that tighten it down, don't over tighten them. I solved this problem with black tape :lol:

Tom Powell Sat Aug 23, 2014 3:53 pm

Brian wrote:

Jack_O_Trades wrote: On the turn signal, the box that houses the switch and clamps to the column rotates pretty freely, Is it supposed to do this or should it be solid?

Solid, there are only two screws that tighten it down, don't over tighten them. I solved this problem with black tape :lol:

Here's the same repair/hack using heavy wire ties.


Aloha
tp

chabanais Sat Aug 23, 2014 4:40 pm

Please don't destroy its originality they are rare in such nice condition.

Tcash Sat Aug 23, 2014 5:11 pm

Hi
Pull the two screws out and make sure this piece is not missing.


There is two ways to go about this.
Shim the column.
File the switch housing down.
Good Luck
Tcash

busdaddy Sat Aug 23, 2014 5:31 pm

Tcash wrote: Hi
Pull the two screws out and make sure this piece is not missing.


There is two ways to go about this.
Shim the column.
File the switch housing down.
Good Luck
Tcash
More than two ways, try squishing the curved thing in that circle in a vise a tiny bit first to slightly reduce the curve, a strip of fine sandpaper or emory cloth folded over so the gritty sides are out between the column and the switch also helps alot.

Tcash Sat Aug 23, 2014 5:46 pm

Anti Skid Tape
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/posting.php?mode=reply&t=604090

Wasted youth Sat Aug 23, 2014 7:28 pm

Jack_O_Trades wrote:
Thanks for the tips,

The tank is definitely full of crud. I guess I should just go ahead and pull everything (engine, tank, trans) and get things done right. It's seems pointless to chase these problems when there are too many variables (fixes) that need to be taken care of first.

The more I hear about bus envy, the more I am inclined to keep it stock.

This.

Jack_O_Trades Sun Aug 24, 2014 12:12 am

I had a great time with the bus today.

I decided that I wanted to try to get the engine to run somewhat reliably before pulling it.

I started by checking and setting the valve clearance. In trying to find the TDC for the first cylinder I discovered that the distributor cap was out of sync with the pistons. This, I think would explain why the engine felt like it had no power. I would have to high rev it to get it to move (often stalling) and I couldn't get it to go any faster than 30 mph. I had just attributed this to not having second gear and not being able to pull through it with third.

I read up on a couple of the blogs and the Bentley manual and they all said that TDC for the first cylinder should be when the rotor is at the notch. Well, on my distributor, when the rotor is at the notch this is TDC for the second cylinder. this kind of threw me off but I eventually figured it out.

I set the valve clearance to .004" which I guess is per VW for the buses prior to 1971 (from 1971 on, I guess the clearance is .006") If this is wrong, some one let me know. Setting the clearance for each cylinder went pretty smooth and straight forward. After buttoning up the valves, I rewired the distributor correctly and fired up the engine. It ran fine but then died within a minute or so. I poured some fuel in the carb intake per BusDaddy's suggestion and sure enough is would fire up and run for a bit then die, so it was starved for fuel.

I pulled the carb, took it apart, and cleaned every nook and cranny. Threw on the carb and the engine fired up and kept running. At this point I was able to back off on the idle adjustment to a more reasonable RPM. I took it around the block for a test drive and it actually had power, no stalls. I was even able to get it into third and up to around 45 mph. Heading back home, the engine died and kept dying every time I let off the throttle. I managed to get it home and took a break to think about the problem.

My thoughts were that the carb was probably clogged and it probably came from the fuel pump. The fuel filter used to be after the fuel pump and I know there is crud in the gas tank which means that there is probably crud in the fuel pump. When I cleaned the carb, I moved the filter to the low pressure side of the fuel pump. So, whatever crud may have been in the fuel pump now made its way up to the carb.

I pulled the carb and fuel pump and sure enough the carb had crap in it. I tore it down and cleaned it again. The Fuel pump was a sight to see. It looked like someone dumped a can of old dried up varnish into every orifice of the pump. I cleaned the fuel pump and reinstalled everything. I also cleaned up the fuel lines and threw on a new filter down stream of the fuel pump. I still have crap in the tank but I am betting on the filter from preventing it from making it's way to the fuel pump. Worst case, the fuel filter get clogged.

After putting everything together, I took it out for a test drive and it was Awesome! Aside from not having second it was a thrill to drive. great low end torque and easily able to pull through second with third. I drove around for about 30 min with no stalls so I think I have resolved my issues. Now I guess it's time to dig into the gas tank and transmission.

Thanks again for the tips.

Brian Sun Aug 24, 2014 12:21 am

Jack_O_Trades wrote: I decided that I wanted to try to get the engine to run somewhat reliably before pulling it.


Pull the trigger, drop that sucker and get familiar with it. Its easy to static tune it and then throw it in, then retune it.

Jody '71 Sun Aug 24, 2014 1:40 am

You'll really like the fact that the early Bays are the easiest to do an engine/trans removal. Read up thoroughly on how to do it. Just a matter of taking off the bumper, rear apron and unbolting everything, tagging your wires, etc. A motorcycle jack is a big help, they also make for great engine stands once the engine is out. If you do a engine only removal, make sure the trans is supported and not allowed to droop down at all. Some pull the engine /trans as one unit.

Wasted youth Sun Aug 24, 2014 2:43 am

Well, that's got to be a great feeling driving around. Hopefully, you will soon come to the realization that if you want to keep driving around without some other failure besides fuel delivery, you will realize that a car sitting for years without being driven is just a basket of mishaps waiting to happen.

With the amount of time and effort needed to drop the gas tank to do it up proper, you would be very wise to also pull the transmission and replace all the seals and address your second gear problem, as well as open up the nosecone and look at the shifter bushing on the hockey stick. While that is all down and out of the bus, you'll likely find it wise to completely refresh the shifter mechanism. Prior to buttoning all that up after dumping a shitload of cash trying to do all those things right, you'll visit the CV joints and your neglected brake system, including the servo unit and master cylinder, which are likely just waiting to cause a vacuum leak at the booster and/or cylinder failure accompanied by a wash of brake fluid entering the booster cavity.

Obviously, you've found that you can get some progress made by fits and starts. You can drive it as is, but I bet thinking like that will cause you deep frustration at some inopportune moment, resulting in several mechanical regions of your powertrain seeing repeated visits by you, when it all could have been handled in one workflow over several months time.

Just ask me how I know this! :lol:

babysnakes Sun Aug 24, 2014 6:13 am

Jack_O_Trades wrote: I took it out for a test drive and it was Awesome!

That's a bus for ya! Good to hear you got it fingered out. It sounds like she's in good hands.



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