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barefootjohnny Sun Feb 11, 2018 11:02 am

When wiring up an aftermarket cd player to a 1977 baywindow where do I attach the red wire (Switch power source) so that the head unit doesn't drain my secondary battery?

My bus doesn't have the cig lighter so I cant wire it there and when I wired it up on what I thought was the correct fuse spot, it still drained the battery.

Suggestions?

Thank you

busdaddy Sun Feb 11, 2018 1:11 pm

Isn't the whole idea to have it feed from the secondary battery so you can still start the bus after a hard days listening?

Wildthings Sun Feb 11, 2018 2:15 pm

I added a rocker switch to the dash for this use, it has an LED light to let me know when it is on.

Alternately if you don't mind leaving your key in the ignition you can use the "key in" buzzer circuit, it is a gray/black wire in your steer column wiring harness.

barefootjohnny Sun Feb 11, 2018 4:07 pm

busdaddy wrote: Isn't the whole idea to have it feed from the secondary battery so you can still start the bus after a hard days listening?

My secondary batteries are not hooked up to starter battery. I run 200w solar panel to my secondary batteries. I don't want them constantly low due to head unit.

Gonna look into rocker switch

barefootjohnny Sun Feb 11, 2018 4:12 pm

Wildthings wrote: I added a rocker switch to the dash for this use, it has an LED light to let me know when it is on. If you don't ming leaving your key in the ignition you can use the seat belt buzzer circuit, I think it is a gray wire, but check your wiring diagram.

Did you have to attach the rocker switch to a wire in steering column? if so which one?

Wildthings Sun Feb 11, 2018 4:29 pm

barefootjohnny wrote: Wildthings wrote: I added a rocker switch to the dash for this use, it has an LED light to let me know when it is on. If you don't mind leaving your key in the ignition you can use the seat belt buzzer circuit, I think it is a gray wire, but check your wiring diagram.

Did you have to attach the rocker switch to a wire in steering column? if so which one?

The rocker switch is just tee'd off of the fuse protected always hot wire that feeds the stereo, no key is required. This is a different setup than using the "key in" buzzer wire.

telford dorr Sun Feb 11, 2018 5:21 pm

Quote: When wiring up an aftermarket cd player to a 1977 bay window where do I attach the red wire (Switch power source) so that the head unit doesn't drain my secondary battery?

My bus doesn't have the cig lighter so I can't wire it there and when I wired it up on what I thought was the correct fuse spot, it still drained the battery.
If it's draining the secondary battery, then you can't wire it up to any of the regular spots on the fuse block, as they're all fed by the primary battery. I assume you have a separate feeder coming from the secondary battery to all of the camper type accessories via its own fuse block?. The red and yellow power wires from the stereo must come from there.

I find it strange that there is a drainage problem with the stereo in the "off" position, but if so, (as said previously) put a switch in the red wire that you can switch off when it's not in use. See if that helps. The yellow wire must have full-time power to keep the clock and station memory viable. Eventually, even these functions will drain the battery over a period of weeks or months, so periodic charging will be required.

Q: how long does it take to drain the secondary battery?

A rocker switch is fine, but any style switch will do. An indicator light is a good idea so you don't forget that it's on.

barefootjohnny Sun Feb 11, 2018 5:42 pm

I am upgrading my solar system to run 2 batteries in a series. But before the cd player would drain the battery within a couple days. Not a big deal, but since the cd player and other electronics will run off the batteries hooked to the solar, then I dont want to worry about maybe a cloudy week and the batteries getting drained. Think the switch will work just fine. Not to worried about losing stations or time. I bought a cd player that actually has no cd player and instead is more bluetooth oriented.

rottenkid Sun Feb 11, 2018 6:44 pm

Vw buses are similar to my 66 van I had years ago. You need the vehicle running in order to use a radio. On that vehicle I added a switch, connected to a hot supply. When I wanted the radio to work without the vehicle running the the switch would be on. I think this is what your in need for your system.

69BahamaYellow Mon Feb 12, 2018 8:49 am

Only problem with toggle switches is you forget to turn them off. If your bus has a door buzzer circuit (that reminds you the key is still in the ignition when you open the door, then you can use that like an accessory switch for radios, etc. I did that with 1978, when we installed a retrosound radio (starting at the bottom of page 7 of this post.

Accessory switch you won't forget to turn off

Here's how you wire it up

Jeff Geisen Mon Feb 12, 2018 3:58 pm

The headlight switch is easy to get at, it has a full time power spade #50 I believe, and #30 is switched power. Remove the switch and plug on a spade splitter and choose your circuit. Remount the switch and viola, minimal hackery and it's already fused.

Above not intended for amplifier power supply.

asiab3 Mon Feb 12, 2018 5:12 pm

Jeff Geisen wrote: spade splitter

In case anyone reading hasn't seen one, they're a great way to add accessories without chopping up the factory wiring!

Robbie


telford dorr Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:37 am

If you have (or buy or or can borrow) an "F" terminal crimp tool, these are better (as in 'factory stock'):

Available online from DigiKey. About a quarter a pop.
(Sorry, Robbie...)

asiab3 Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:40 am

No apology needed- Iíve never seen the splitters with factory crimp style- thanks!
Robbie

telford dorr Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:47 am

Yup. I've used a ton of them lately, adding a tach and other gauges to a Gary project. Makes it trivial. One note: if you add shrink tubing (always recommended), be sure to put it on the wire before crimping on the terminal - really hard afterwards.

Also, the p/n on the big 0.375" terminal has changed. Will update the gallery pic with the new number soon.

jakokombi Tue Feb 13, 2018 12:41 pm

All of this talk of adding switches in the dash when there is a nice original one with a green light already there. I mean, the defroster doesn't work anyway, right?

Globespotter Tue Feb 13, 2018 1:17 pm

jakokombi wrote: All of this talk of adding switches in the dash when there is a nice original one with a green light already there. I mean, the defroster doesn't work anyway, right?

I like this thinking...

Terminatez Tue Feb 13, 2018 7:24 pm

telford dorr wrote: If you have (or buy or or can borrow) an "F" terminal crimp tool, these are better (as in 'factory stock'):

Available online from DigiKey. About a quarter a pop.
(Sorry, Robbie...)

What the difference between the F type crimp tool to an open barrel type crimp tool?
https://www.amazon.com/Tool-Aid-SGT18600-Crimping-Barrel/dp/B00BQWO5RU


I tried searching arouund..

telford dorr Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:23 pm

It's the same thing. "F" type terminal is the official name of the VW terminal type. (Hold the terminal up so the wire holding fingers point to the right. You'll see the letter F).

One difference between the tool you posted and the Greenlee or Del City tool is that those tools are "controlled cycle" tools. They have a ratchet system and a stop, such that once the crimp cycle is started, it must be completed before the tool will open again. You can't under- or over-crimp the terminal. Also, these tools has more leverage than the simple manual type tool, making crimping large wires easier.

Your tool doesn't have those features, so it requires a little more skill (patience, really) to use it. Not a big deal if you're just an occasional user (and some times it's a benefit on odd wire sizes) . If you use it on a frequent basis, then the controlled cycle tool is worth the extra cost.

telford dorr Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:35 pm

One note on the terminal shown below: this terminal is a high quality terminal. Note that the blue plastic insulator is pressed onto a piece of metal tubing, and this assembly is pressed onto the terminal body. This construction is far superior to the normal cheap FLAPS terminals which don't have the metal tube piece. These cheap FLAPS terminals are thin and will open up, releasing the force on the wire, allowing it to pull out. The terminals with the tubing have no seam, and can't open. Sometimes, instead of adding a piece of metal tubing, they will weld the seam to create a tube. Same effect.

This lack of a welded seam or tubing is what gives crimp terminals a bad reputation from wires pulling out.

Now this terminal doesn't have the insulation gripping properties of a factory terminal for strain relief, so I prefer the factory type. But if you do choose to use the terminal type shown, look for either a welded seam or the tubing when purchasing them (you may have to disassemble one to check it properly).
(Factory "F" terminals don't have this issue because of the complex fold the crimp tool puts in the terminal, which adds incredible strength to the crimp.)



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