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  View original topic: Hose for Mr Buddy Heater
Maine Wed May 08, 2019 5:00 am

I have a Mr Buddy heater that I would like to connect to the onboard propane tank. I have removed the fridge. Is there a hose that will connect to the propane tank line and then to the heater? Both ends would have to be male.




Tobias Duncan Wed May 08, 2019 6:17 am

You will have to make one. I would start with the solid green hose that Mr Heater sells and then cut off one end and replace with the correct fitting. Also a good idea to purchase the filter from them as well. These units can get clogged up with oils that weep from the plastic of the propane hose.

crazyvwvanman Wed May 08, 2019 6:32 am

That heater has its own built-in pressure regulator and uses high pressure propane direct from the bottles. That Westy propane pipe that went to the fridge carries low pressure propane that comes out of the Westy tank's pressure regulator. I don't know how well that is going to work, and I'm curious if it will.

Mark

danfromsyr Wed May 08, 2019 6:44 am

the propane hard line is standard 3/8 flare
you will want to put a shut off valve on the end of the copper 1st then the new flex hose. I also recommend you better secure the copper once it's made up.

you don't need a regulator since the tank already has one on it, and the buddy heater end acts as a regulator.

https://www.google.com/search?q=3%2F8+flare+ball+valve

something like this will allow a BBQ style hose to fit on.
https://www.supplyhouse.com/Everflow-FTGV-38R38R-3-8-Flare-Gas-Ball-Valve



then the filter for the heater side
https://www.google.com/search?ei=7trSXOWgCKq4ggeSv4GwBg&q=buddy+heater+filter



then a length of propane rated hose, there isn't any pressure in the hose but it's rated for the job none the less
one end has 3/8 flare to couple to the shut off valve. the other end has a Male pipe thread to couple to the 1x20 (disposable bottle) adapter end that will screw into the filter. you will need gas rated teflon thread sealant (paste)

https://www.hardwareandtools.com/mr-heater-f271163-60-assembly-hose-propane-5ft-ceca-5026.html



danfromsyr Wed May 08, 2019 6:50 am

Mark, not sure I agree.
the orifice at the top of the green bottles is a pressure regulator itself.

and all the years I've used a MR buddy portable I've used a 20#bottle, a BBQ hose(w/regulator) and an (1x20) adapter at the heater .
and never used a filter, and consequently had a unit fail to operate from clogged piping. so do recommend a filter for prolonged bulk tank use.
I think it's the smelly oil they put in the tank that clogs it more than rubber erosion from the hose.

but this advise is worth what anyone has paid for it.

crazyvwvanman wrote: That heater has its own built-in pressure regulator and uses high pressure propane direct from the bottles. That Westy propane pipe that went to the fridge carries low pressure propane that comes out of the Westy tank's pressure regulator. I don't know how well that is going to work, and I'm curious if it will.

Mark

crazyvwvanman Wed May 08, 2019 7:17 am

You can see in the OP photo the heater has an built-in regulator that the green bottle screws into. That is why I was curious if the heater works ok when the pressure is already lowered by the Westy regulator. I'd prefer that it did so I wouldn't need to run a line for high pressure propane inside my van.


EDIT:::Here is a heater parts list that includes and shows the built-in regulator, set for 11" like the Westy regulator is also set for.

https://www.ereplacementparts.com/heater-mh9b-heater-parts-c-197733_197735_202230.html

If it is ok to feed the heater propane that has already been regulated to 11" that is what I was curious about.

Mark

DanHoug Wed May 08, 2019 7:18 am

regardless of RV laws, NFPA regulation, and best practice... i would NEVER permanently run high pressure propane thru a line, ESPECIALLY a rubber flex line, into the interior of an RV.

at 130F, a not crazy temp inside a closed vehicle or underneath a vehicle over hot asphalt, the liquid propane vapor pressure is nearly 260psi. this is the reason every single RV has the propane regulator attached directly to the steel DOT/ASME rated propane tank.... to eliminate high pressure piping. all subsequent piping is low pressure.

typical high pressure rubber propane hose has a working pressure of 350 psi. not a large margin for a hot vehicle. 1750 psi burst pressure. this works for a portable setup off a 20lb tank but not in mounted in vibration/corrosion/impact prone RV applications. it's a whole different ballgame.

Sodo Wed May 08, 2019 7:49 am

I’m with DanHoug. Don’t let high pressure propane into an enclosed space. Its a propane bookkeeping rule. Don’t question it, don’t do it.

The main reason you don’t pipe high pressure propane into a contained space is because the pressure can deliver a volume of propane quickly, which mixes with the oxygen in the enclosed space, reaching explosive concentration.

11” means “11 inches water column” which is 0.4 psi.

At 11 inches pressure, leaks dissipate. You (hopefully) smell a leak, but generally, its not coming out fast enough to create an explosive mixture. At “260 psi” (130F!) much more propane can escape, mixing with the oxygen in the contained space, rising in concentration to become ignitable and the “enclosure” is the other component of “the bomb”.

So you never allow high pressure to enter the enclosed space.

Of course 11” can fill an enclosed space too, but probably not thru “a leak”.

Two regulators in line would each allow propane to pass. Otherwise you could never empty a tank to less than “11 inches water column”? And we know propane tanks empty to “zero”.

adapting your heater to the copper pipe shown (regulated outside) can be done safely. A propane shop can make you a proper hose to adapt directly to the Buddy heater.

Abscate Wed May 08, 2019 9:17 am

About 90% of the propane practices here on Samba are manifestly unsafe.

This will come home to roost one day,

Dampcamper Wed May 08, 2019 1:32 pm

Gotta go with DanHoug too. Propane is an awesome fuel but not when it gets loose inside an enclosed space, it changes to an awesome explosive then.

Most of my propane work has been on boats, the ABYC has some listed standards and practices that I consider a good starting point for installations.
I've seen what's left of a couple of boats after propane leaks. At least the pieces they could find.
Good intentions but if you don't do it "boat style" with a gas sniffer mounted low and a solenoid valve to cut off fuel flow if a leak is detected, I'd really recommend against a plumbed-in setup.
(edit: I should say "A plumbed in setup using flexible hose and quick disconnects." Nothing wrong with a permanent installation, properly done, of course).



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