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  View original topic: Emission testing in Pennsylvania
djkeev Sat Mar 06, 2021 5:33 am

I'm rebuilding my 90 in Pennsylvania.
It will stay here and be plated in Pennsylvania.

I'm an ex Licensed State Vehicle Inspector for Pennsylvania, though it has been a while. My license expired and standards have changed.

I was concerned about getting the exhaust sniffed and if this old unit would pass muster.

My PO licensed the unit as an antique, Antique plates require a safety check but no emission testing, my 86 was licensed as an antique in NJ for the use was extremely limited and it exempted emission testing..... no inspection of any kind actually in NJ.

I'll be driving this 90 daily and the Pa antique plate guidelines suggest allowed use of about 1 day a week.
That option is out for me!

I did some searching and found that Pennsylvania, as many States now do, rely heavily on OBDII readings for emissions.

The actual testing requirements vary by County through the State. It is broken into regions. Some regions are still sniffing tail pipes (such as Pittsburgh)

Happily for me, my County (Berks) requires a safety inspection for older vehicles, (no problem, I plan to roll safe), a gas cap test, (new gas cap, bring it on!) and a visual compliance check.

The visual check is for emission related items. Catalytic Convertor, EGR valves, vapor recovery, etc.

Whew!
My worry was for naught!
Life IS Good!

revolution337 Sat Mar 06, 2021 6:27 am

Quote: My PO licensed the unit as an antique, Antique plates require a safety check but no emission testing, my 86 was licensed as an antique in NJ for the use was extremely limited and it exempted emission testing..... no inspection of any kind actually in NJ.

Actually, in PA, antique plates do not require a safety or emissions test. Classic plates require a safety inspection, but no emissions.

http://www.dot.state.pa.us/public/dvspubsforms/BMV/BMV%20Fact%20Sheets/fs-ant.pdf

And yes, in your county (Berks) an OBD test would be required if the vehicle is 1996 or newer. You are correct that your 90 van would receive a gas cap test and visual anti-tampering for emissions equipment.

http://www.drivecleanpa.state.pa.us/changes/fs_sc.pdf

tjet Sat Mar 06, 2021 4:13 pm

I just bought a new gas cap for my 85 for emissions testing purposes. I've failed smog tests enough for leaking caps that I always keep a fresh one in the glove box.

It was $11. I think it's German made too.


fxr Sat Mar 06, 2021 4:22 pm

tjet wrote: I just bought a new gas cap for my 85 for emissions testing purposes. I've failed smog tests enough for leaking caps that I always keep a fresh one in the glove box.

It was $11

How are they doing the pressure test with your own cap on? My local SMOG station has an adapter they fit instead of the cap, and then they pressurise to a few PSI. It has to not lose a certain amount within five minutes.

dabaron Sat Mar 06, 2021 4:47 pm

you can't retain the antique plate if you plan to daily or mostly drive it. it's for "occasional" use only - one day a week. unless you are me and live in Philly.

if you do retain the antique registration, that plate is your's, it stays with the vehicle.

kamzcab86 Sat Mar 06, 2021 4:53 pm

fxr wrote:
How are they doing the pressure test with your own cap on? My local SMOG station has an adapter they fit instead of the cap, and then they pressurise to a few PSI. It has to not lose a certain amount within five minutes.

Here in AZ, the pre-OBD cap itself is tested off the vehicle.

djkeev Sat Mar 06, 2021 5:39 pm

NJ tests even OBD vehicle gas caps off the vehicle. Just the cap, everything subject to inspection gets the cap tested.

Dave

jimf909 Sat Mar 06, 2021 5:51 pm

WA state has terminated all emissions testing. 25 year old cars were previously exempt but I was surprised to hear my newer cars don't need a test either.

Abscate Sun Mar 07, 2021 3:57 am

We used to sniff in urban counties in NY but now most just do an OBD check engine light both ready and off. Much easier and equally effective

djkeev Sun Mar 07, 2021 4:50 am

Back in the late 60s we may have mumbled and grumbled about emission testing being implemented.
The new cars had an air pump bolted to the engine and air injection tubes into each cylinder. They were in the way and sapped power!

Throughout the 70s and 80s engines became almost undriveable with the emission controls.

Then the late 80s and 90s came along and engine management technology took off!

The engines began to run better, fuel mileage got better, more power from smaller displacements, they ran so clean that oil lasted longer longer and engine life expectancy soared!

On my Dad's 56 Chevy he was THRILLED that he rolled over 100;000 miles without a rebuild!
Today?
We're pissed if an engine gives up before 200,000 miles!

Automobile engine technology and fuel management is one thing that actually improved as the years ticked by.

Today, you are hard pressed to commit suicide with a modern automobile in a closed garage. They just don't emit enough poisons to effectively kill you.

Dave

4Gears4Tires Sun Mar 07, 2021 7:22 am

Today? Even 30-40 years ago. 100k miles is the break in period for an M20 or M30! :lol:

dobryan Sun Mar 07, 2021 5:43 pm

djkeev wrote:
Today, you are hard pressed to commit suicide with a modern automobile in a closed garage. They just don't emit enough poisons to effectively kill you.

Dave

Dave, I hope you are not serious about this statement. You will be killed by carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and lack of oxygen. Do not take it lightly.

whafalia Sun Mar 07, 2021 7:21 pm

California here, smog test tomorrow, dyno with a sniffer. His dyno woudn't calibrate last week but he says it's ready now. Did fine the last couple of times since rebuild, fingers crossed!

I was driving my kid and her band to a gig last year, wait no gigs last year, so before that. On the road next to a late 70's car that was belching and I got to tell them 'when I was a kid that's what all cars smelled like!'



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