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GriffithBuilt
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Location: Woodland, WA
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

syncroserge wrote:

Much better results than from an old worn key.


I concur. I bought some really nice key blanks (metal large VW Logos) and had one recut from my key and it was terribly suboptimal. Barely would open the door and certainly wouldn't start the car...

Jason
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'86 VW Vanagon Syncro Westfalia w/ EJ22 Suby Engine; Peloquin Torsen Rear Differential; GoWesty H&R Lift Springs w/ OME's; CV-900 Wheels & Yokohama Geolandar AT-S 29" Tires
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Wildthings
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 10:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

davideric9 wrote:
I would suggest the key code route. Not sure why you would remove both front handles to get the code? Copies of copies over the last 22 years with wear on the keys resulted in my rear hatch NOT working with the copies. I love the idea of having an original key to start again. (Plus I rekeyed two vans to work on one key).


This is a comparison of my old key to the locksmith code generated key.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Your old key isn't even the correct blank. I think someone just found a key that could be forced to work and used it. No wonder it didn't work all that well. That is all I have for my '83 1/2, a "make do". Mine is not the correct key for either the ignition or the door locks, it works okay in the ignition and I pulled a couple of pins out of the passenger door lock so that it would work there as well. The rest of the locks I can't open with the key, but since I live in a rural area and seldom feel the need to lock my doors its no big deal.
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GriffithBuilt
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 11:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Crap. My working keys are the same as his 'old key.' No wonder MINE didn't work well either. I need to visit the dealer and get a known good master that never gets used and then have a locksmith knock out a few more using the Van-Cafe blanks.

My door locks I always thought were suspect and it's probably my key!! :-/

Jason
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'86 VW Vanagon Syncro Westfalia w/ EJ22 Suby Engine; Peloquin Torsen Rear Differential; GoWesty H&R Lift Springs w/ OME's; CV-900 Wheels & Yokohama Geolandar AT-S 29" Tires
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Taylor L
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 12:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

syncrodoka wrote:
I have had keys cut by code in the past also but I don't like them. They original keys have a nice smooth transition between the key cuts and won't poke you when they are in your pocket. The local locksmith said thay they will literally saw thorough the ignition cylinder over time- There are many vanagons in town so he has experience with them.
Fresh OEM keys-
Man, I would get a new locksmith. Any decent code cut key, that is cut with a good code machine will not be any more intrusive to the lock than a worn out key. They certainly won't "saw" through a lock, nor would they be likely to bother you in your pocket.

One that is cut with a punch might be a bit more aggressive than one cut with a code machine, but it's still a better choice. davidderic9's key looks like it was cut with a punch, or by a locksmith that didn't know how to use a code machine.

When you have a vehicle that has been in service that many years, it's not only the keys that have worn, the locks have worn as well. Cutting a new key off of a worn out key is inviting trouble, not only because of continued wear, but also because a duplicate is never going to be completely accurate copy of the key being copied. You are exponentially increasing your chances of having problems with some of your locks not working in the future, especially your ignition lock and driver's door. A good key that is cut to factory specs decreases your chances of having problems.

Taylor
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syncrodoka
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

He said something about the OEM key blank not being as soft as most blanks- solid as opposed to a covered brass blank. I have a key for my 7 year old mazda and it shows signs of wearing with the brass starting to show. My 6 year old OEM vanagon blank still looks new. He wasn't trying to sell me anything, just talking shop.

Quote:
Hey Syncrodoka what van are they for i have that same keycode for my van

These keys aren't in service for any of my vans. They came with a lock that I bought from the dealer. If I ever get really bored I might rekey a van to work with it.
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Taylor L
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 1:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

syncrodoka wrote:
He said something about the OEM key blank not being as soft as most blanks- solid as opposed to a covered brass blank. I have a key for my 7 year old mazda and it shows signs of wearing with the brass starting to show. My 6 year old OEM vanagon blank still looks new. He wasn't trying to sell me anything, just talking shop.

Yea the brass keys are softer than the old steel blanks. They still wear though.

By the way, the best thing you can do to keep your locks from wearing and to keep them in good shape, is to stop by your local lock shop every so often and get them to lube your locks.

Taylor

p.s. don't put WD-40 in them.
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syncrodoka
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 1:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
p.s. don't put WD-40 in them.

That is very good advise. Cool
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Taylor L
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 2:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have some of these blanks on order.

If anyone here on the Samba wants to get a code cut key, I can do a plastic head key for 9 bucks shipped. Just get me your code.

Taylor
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ajdenette
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 8:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

for my vanagon the 2 kees that came with the car are still in service and in great shape its a 90 with a tun of miles on it. i also have a subaru with a factory key that shows its wear and the keys we got cut from the kode dont works so good or nearly as well as the copys made from the warn origonal key.
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danfromsyr
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 9:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was thinking of resetting my lock tumblers to "blank" key profile.

still requires a key, and any with a cut wouldn't work, but any uncut blank is my spare Wink
What I'd like to know is where can I get tumbler wafers? besides the junkyard where I do try to remember to pull door handles in early MK-I/II/III VWs when I see them easily enough.

add "Key Machine" to your semi-irregular craigslist searches, as I found a great one local for $80 last year.. and with 4+ vanagons inthe family (mom always losing keys) it's been very handy.

also I bought from Mrlock.com for their plastic headed "N" profile keys, they don't have a VW in them but the price was very reasonable and they answered any/all questions I had promptly and as best they could.
I ordered in groups of 10, but they are sold (ea. $1.52) or (10+ $1.14)


Dan in NY

anyone with a vanagon in the greater Central NY area I'd be happy to make a vanagon spare key for just a few bux ( [email protected] )
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devesvws
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

wow great info. i have well over 100 used vw keys. of the 9 vws i have, only 1 or 2 keys will open the door, but wont turn the ignition lock?? its amazing how key cuts work the tumblers, and the ignition lock is the most unforgiving. every locksmith i have ever dealt with use wd 40 for cleaning and lubing the lock, but i think some type of very thin grease for long term use, needs to be used. i have had to get keys made to about 100 cars (mostly vws) and for what ever its worth, they always go to the passenger side door lock for the code. i do however believe that the passenger side code is the main code for all locks, and i'm not sure about the drivers side, but at some point the vallet key comes into play. i miss my locksmith, he was real nice to me. he tought me a few tricks cuting a key with a file kit and geting the dredful audi door handle off. so sad he lost the business Crying or Very sad you guys with a good freind thats a locksmith are very lucky.
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Taylor L
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 1:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ajdenette wrote:
...we got cut from the kode dont works so good or nearly as well as the copys made from the warn origonal key.
Don't know what to tell you. Maybe your code cut keys weren't cut correctly. Barring that, maybe your vehicle somehow defies the basic principles of locksmithing. And then again, if locksmithing has taught me anything, it's never say never about anything.

-t
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Taylor L
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 1:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

devesvws wrote:
wow great info. i have well over 100 used vw keys. of the 9 vws i have, only 1 or 2 keys will open the door, but wont turn the ignition lock?? its amazing how key cuts work the tumblers, and the ignition lock is the most unforgiving.
That is usually by design, and is the logical way to design the locks. Many times the ignition locks will have a lot tighter tolerances. The ignition lock is the one you definitely don't want someone to be able to compromise.

It would be nice if all the locks were designed as well, but it's a money thing. They don't put the money into the other locks usually. You might be surprised at how easy it is to pick a door lock on most cars.

Also, many times the door locks, trunk locks and glove box locks don't use as many cuts on the key as the ignition lock. Some might use as few as 5 on a 10-cut key. I'm not sure how the locks on the vanagon are. I'd have to look in my book to see.

devesvws wrote:
..every locksmith i have ever dealt with use wd 40 for cleaning and lubing the lock, but i think some type of very thin grease for long term use, needs to be used.
WD-40 is a really bad choice for locks. I hate to say it, but any locksmith should know that. Basically, it evaporates. It's fine to use it to flush out a lock, but not a good choice for lubing it.

Tri-flow is a good choice, or something with Teflon. There are excellent lubricants made specially for locksmiths that have staying power and are far superior to lubricants that come in the locks when new.

devesvws wrote:
i have had to get keys made to about 100 cars (mostly vws) and for what ever its worth, they always go to the passenger side door lock for the code. i do however believe that the passenger side code is the main code for all locks, and i'm not sure about the drivers side,
The code does tend to be on the left door lock more often. That's not always the case though, sometimes they are in other spots. Many cars don't even have a key code. Those are fun.

Most of my work is originating keys. I go up to a car and it might be locked with no key. I have to get into it, and get a code. On many cars, almost all GM's, that means picking the ignition and reading it off the cylinder.

If it doesn't have a code, I have to take a lock apart and read the wafers. If it's a transponder equipped key, I program it to the ECU.

It's by far the most fun thing I've ever done for work.

Taylor
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krupky
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2010 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

not to hijack this thread, but i spent a few hours running around yesterday trying to find someone who would cut the blank i bought from GoWesty. during that process i learned that almost no locksmith in portland will cut steel keys anymore.

evidently, as of June 1 Oregon now requires their locksmiths to be certified and so a lot of the veterans who were close to retiring, have done so. so after 4 stops i finally found a nice man who was willing to do it for me - he didn't want to at first, but decided to give it a shot. it didn't turn out perfect, but neither was the key it was copied from. bottom line, i tried to give him so money for the effort, but he wouldn't take it..

if i had to do it over again, i'd probably get the number and have it cut to order.
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brexcavator
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2010 7:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Head up to Vancouver, WA .. I just had 2 of my vanagons that were missing keys done up in Oak Harbor. I just popped off the drivers handles and steel wooled the leg a little.. 4 numbers.. Took him 15 minutes for both keys and cost 15 a piece.
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BillM
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2010 6:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only person I use for my vw's

Steve Sandlin
[email protected]
Cost me under 30.00 for four keys cut by code shipped to my door. Keep in mind just the plain keys but they are what I like on my key ring.

Bill
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