Hello! Log in or Register   |  Help  |  Donate  |  Buy Shirts New!  See all banner ads | Advertise on TheSamba.com  
TheSamba.com
 
Kick Azz 1975 LaGrande Super Rebuild
Page: Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 13, 14, 15 ... 24, 25, 26  Next
Jump to:
Forum Index -> Beetle - Late Model/Super - 1968-up Share: Facebook Twitter
Reply to topic
Print View
Quick sort: Show newest posts on top | Show oldest posts on top View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
MK5GOLFGTI
Samba Member


Joined: July 21, 2013
Posts: 169
Location: Midwest, USA
MK5GOLFGTI is offline 

PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2013 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm late to the party, but this build and story are epic!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
TedzBug
Samba Member


Joined: May 26, 2004
Posts: 272
Location: Michigan, USA
TedzBug is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Aug 27, 2013 3:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just read through the whole thing... Gives me even more motivation to keep working on my own '75 sunroof super.... Smile

Awesome work and amazingly detailed build. Good stuff!!
_________________
'75 Super Beetle
http://www.pbase.com/tedzillich/1975_super_beetle
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website Gallery Classifieds Feedback
baxsie
Samba Member


Joined: August 09, 2005
Posts: 602
Location: Eastern Washington State
baxsie is offline 

PostPosted: Sun Sep 01, 2013 9:44 pm    Post subject: Making modern fan shroud work with Fuel Injection (left) Reply with quote

MK5GOLFGTI wrote:
I'm late to the party, but this build and story are epic!

This party is just starting Smile "Epic"? . . . . I wonder if that is a good thing?

TedzBug wrote:
Just read through the whole thing... Gives me even more motivation to keep working on my own '75 sunroof super.... Smile
Awesome work and amazingly detailed build. Good stuff!!

Thanks for the kind words. Looks like you have quite a nice project going there TedzBug. I hope we can keep progress going. School is back in for the boy, so of course he is busy busy busy.

OK, so back in the one of the engine build posts, we found that the nice, modern fan shroud (doghouse + venturi) intersects with the fuel rails. Since we wanted to get going, we borrowed a "36 hp" doghouse shroud for testing.

As I poked around at the modern shroud, it seemed to me that there was some "dead space" below the heater outlet. Time to cut it open and verify my hunch:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I folded the tin out of the way and gave it a test fit:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


A little more love to the tin. To keep the strength I flattened out the outer skin, and formed a very thin "box" between it and the inner skin:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Another test fit indicated that a tiny bit of extra clearance at the corner of the injector would be nice. You can see where I dented the heater outlet a bit in this pic, it is marked in sharpie in the pic above. Then it was another depressing battle between me and the MIG. Pretty sure the fan shroud lost:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I might not be able to weld my way our of a damp paper bag, but I can grind and sand with the best of 'em Smile A little primer and sanding and I think this will look good:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Does it work? I think so:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


It does look like the fan shroud might have to come out to remove the injectors. Oh well.

This is the "easy" side. The passenger side injector is farther rearward so it will be a different animal. For another day.
_________________
1975 LaGrande Super Beetle Build Log / Farm boy hinge pin puller / Farm Boy Chassis Rotisserie
"I'm not getting older, I'm getting bitter."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
baxsie
Samba Member


Joined: August 09, 2005
Posts: 602
Location: Eastern Washington State
baxsie is offline 

PostPosted: Sun Sep 15, 2013 5:18 pm    Post subject: Making modern fan shroud work with Fuel Injection (right) Reply with quote

I took on clearancing the right side of the fan shroud to make room for the fuel injectors and fuel rail.

Opening it up, as before:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Since the right side cylinders are farther back, we needed to relocate the heater air outlet higher:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is a shot from the front, showing there is now clearance:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


And a shot from the rear:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


If you look really close, you can see that the right side outlet is a bit higher, but there is so much noise in the engine compartment that I do not think it is very noticeable. Also removed the coil mount holes and spark plug keeper holes:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Now for another quick bead blast, some DTM primer, some filler primer and sanding . . .
_________________
1975 LaGrande Super Beetle Build Log / Farm boy hinge pin puller / Farm Boy Chassis Rotisserie
"I'm not getting older, I'm getting bitter."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
levetto
Samba Member


Joined: April 14, 2010
Posts: 43
Location: Guatemala
levetto is offline 

PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2013 10:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow

Cool
_________________
1303s Super Beetle GSR Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Classifieds Feedback
baxsie
Samba Member


Joined: August 09, 2005
Posts: 602
Location: Eastern Washington State
baxsie is offline 

PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2013 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

levetto wrote:
Wow Cool

Thanks. Always good to hear some appreciation . . . keeps the spirits up Smile

Things have been going a bit slow. The boy is super busy with school, cross country and pep band. Meanwhile I have been keeping myself occupied by puttering around on the fan shroud injector clearance project. I used some primer and a bit of body filler (sorry), and finally got it prepped to where I tried painting it.

Eventually it will end up getting another sanding/scuffing and then get shot with the body color. For now I shot it with some of the gloss black we had for chassis parts.

My biggest challenge was getting the large flat area actually flat. There was the normal warping from taking out the spark plug wire guide holes and the coil mounting holes. It actually looks pretty good in person:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Definitely not perfect, but I did learn a bit about prepping and painting:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I also worked on smoothing out the tooling ridges around the corners and on the top edge:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I spent less time on the back side, though there was an emissions tube attachment removed:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Detail of the driver side injector clearance work:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Detail of the passenger side injector clearance work:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Overall, I think it is a pretty good solution. All the injector clearance you would get with a 36hp style shroud and all the late-model advanced airflow engineering.
_________________
1975 LaGrande Super Beetle Build Log / Farm boy hinge pin puller / Farm Boy Chassis Rotisserie
"I'm not getting older, I'm getting bitter."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
19-VW-74
Samba Member


Joined: June 28, 2009
Posts: 663
Location: Utah
19-VW-74 is offline 

PostPosted: Mon Oct 07, 2013 10:16 pm    Post subject: Re: Making Gas Door Release Inside Again Reply with quote

baxsie wrote:
Sins of welding forgiven with penance of grinder, sander, and bead blaster.


That's how I do it! Laughing
_________________
-Austin
My 1974 Standard Beetle Build:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=492617
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Bashr52
Samba Member


Joined: July 16, 2006
Posts: 5666
Location: On an island in VA
Bashr52 is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Oct 08, 2013 6:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looking good! While you are at it, you should fill in the indent for the stock oil bath air cleaner, since you will no longer be needed that Laughing Also, since I don't see heater boxes on that exhaust system, why not remove the heater outlets all together?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
baxsie
Samba Member


Joined: August 09, 2005
Posts: 602
Location: Eastern Washington State
baxsie is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Oct 08, 2013 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bashr52 wrote:
Looking good! . . .

Thanks.
Bashr52 wrote:
. . . you should fill in the indent for the stock oil bath air cleaner, since you will no longer be needed that. . .

Too late ! And I would have had to extend the fins inside . . . more welding more warping Sad
Bashr52 wrote:
. . . I don't see heater boxes on that exhaust system . . .

There will be heater boxes. That is just another project for another day. Probably a big project, knowing me.
_________________
1975 LaGrande Super Beetle Build Log / Farm boy hinge pin puller / Farm Boy Chassis Rotisserie
"I'm not getting older, I'm getting bitter."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Bashr52
Samba Member


Joined: July 16, 2006
Posts: 5666
Location: On an island in VA
Bashr52 is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 4:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bashr52 wrote:
. . . you should fill in the indent for the stock oil bath air cleaner, since you will no longer be needed that. . .

Too late ! And I would have had to extend the fins inside . . . more welding more warping Sad

No need to extend the fins, just leave the shroud like it is and box in that hole on the outside so it looks smooth.

Doesn't matter now anyway! Laughing Looking forward to seeing it all together finally!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Rome
Samba Member


Joined: June 02, 2004
Posts: 7485
Location: Pearl River, NY
Rome is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The position of the fresh air outlets here-
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


remind me of her-
http://images.wikia.com/twilightsaga/images/2/27/Shannen-Doherty.jpg

Shocked

What; none of you ever noticed before?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
baxsie
Samba Member


Joined: August 09, 2005
Posts: 602
Location: Eastern Washington State
baxsie is offline 

PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 4:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rome wrote:
. . . remind me of her . . .


Great. Now you ruined my work. I guess I'll start over.
_________________
1975 LaGrande Super Beetle Build Log / Farm boy hinge pin puller / Farm Boy Chassis Rotisserie
"I'm not getting older, I'm getting bitter."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
baxsie
Samba Member


Joined: August 09, 2005
Posts: 602
Location: Eastern Washington State
baxsie is offline 

PostPosted: Sat Oct 19, 2013 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Over the last couple of weeks, we have been working on installing the seats. We placed the original seat back in the car, to measure where the new seat should be positioned. We then placed the new seat on blocks to verify that things felt right. Once we had the height and fore-aft locations set, we could start fabricating.

My guess is that most people will think this is a bit on the over-done side. Well, you know: "If it's worth doing, it's worth overdoing." Seriously though, we wanted to do our best to make sure the safety and support that the new Recaro Speed S seats offered would stay anchored to the chassis in the case of a collision. Being strapped in a seat won't help if the seat is slamming around inside the car.

Since the bottom portion of the new seats are thinner than the stock seats, the mounting sits quite high. We decided to anchor the inboard side of the seat directly to the tunnel, using formed 2"x1/8" flat stock to make a reinforcement:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The mounts are made of some thick steel stock, shaped then drilled and tapped to mate with the hardware supplied with the seat:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


We carefully mounted the seat's sliding rails to a piece of plywood, so we could check for spacing and level:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is the construction of the outboard posts. We started with a fairly heavy angle, then welded a cube of the thick steel stock to the end. We then cleaned it up, drilled and tapped it:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The outboard posts are welded to angles, the angles cut or formed to match the pan contours:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Once the posts were installed, we carefully measured square and cross bracing made of 1/2" square steel tube. This was all test-fit against the plywood-mounted rails to be sure things moved smoothly:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


A shot of the bracing from another angle:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


We are getting ready to start on the passenger side:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is a video of the action:

Link


And the result:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is a picture of both seats installed, in the middle of their travel:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is the passenger seat all the way back, driver all the way forward:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Both seats all the way forward:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The seats fold forward for easy rear seat access:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

_________________
1975 LaGrande Super Beetle Build Log / Farm boy hinge pin puller / Farm Boy Chassis Rotisserie
"I'm not getting older, I'm getting bitter."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
baxsie
Samba Member


Joined: August 09, 2005
Posts: 602
Location: Eastern Washington State
baxsie is offline 

PostPosted: Sat Nov 02, 2013 11:53 am    Post subject: Vintage Hurst Shifter Repair Reply with quote

One of the background projects has been to repair/rebuild a Hurst Shifter that we picked up at the local salvage yard, out of a 1973 Super. It looked pretty rough, and was missing a knob, but who could say "no" to Hurst?

The most obvious problem was that the upper plastic plate was cracked. We drilled out the rivets and assessed the damage. It appears that other (later?) shifters had a thicker/stronger top plate (photo from Chadwick James Moore's Samba Ad):
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


We figured that just gluing would be futile, so we used some control cable as rebar to strengthen it. The vise grip pliers are holding a good stiff tension on the wire:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Then slathered on the JB-Weld Epoxy. On each of the four corner mounting holes, we embedded and external tooth lock washer in the epoxy, so that tightening the mounting bolts would not crush the plastic and blow out the corner holes. The washer in the upper right of this image is visible, the others are submerged in epoxy:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is what it looked like after the epoxy has cured:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


We then trimmed the reinforcing wire, and cleaned it up on the belt sander and used a file to flatten the corners. Here you can see the external tooth lock washers embedded in the epoxy:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The ball was still loose when sandwiched by the two plastic plates. Initially we thought that sanding some material off the plates' mating surfaces would tighten it up OK. After looking again, the amount of material we would have to remove was way too much. Instead we cleaned the plate thoroughly and used superglue to bond a piece of denim cloth to the upper plate's socket, then trimmed it with a razor:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


For lubrication we used some synthetic grease we had on hand. We were worried about a petroleum lube attacking the plastic over time:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The main ball had some pretty nasty rust. We worked through: wire brush, 600, 1500, then polishing compound. The lower ball was in much better shape, requiring only a bit of polishing. We thought the assembly method of these three pieces was poor. There were two short roll-pins, one each pressed through the ball, through the wall of the main shaft, and then nudging into a small recess on the shaft of the lower ball. Pretty much asking for slop. We drilled through the shaft of the lower ball, then pressed a single solid pin all the way through. The pin was cut from the end of a punch, so it is nice, hard, strong material. This assembly is rock solid now:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


We cleaned and polished the shaft where the trigger slides:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


There are some spiral cut plastic bearings inside the trigger. We did not like the way those bushings could move around freely inside the trigger. They tended to bunch up at one end. After roughing the outer surface of the bushing and cleaning the inner bore of the trigger, we used epoxy to fix them in position, one at each end of the trigger. At final assembly this slide was lubed with the synthetic grease:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


From pictures in the Samba classifieds, there should be a spring that moves this crescent shaped bar down, but also allows it to ride up. Our spring was missing, of course. As far as I can tell, having the spring allows you to pull the reverse lockout trigger when you are in the 3-4 side of the H, but does not allow you to move into the 3-4 side of the H if the trigger is pulled. We ended up fixing this slide in the down position with a plate. If you are in the 3-4 side of the H you simply cannot pull the trigger, and if the trigger is pulled, you cannot move into the 3-4 side of the H. If real-life operation proves that the spring is needed, we can easily remove the plate and source or fabricate a suitable spring. There is also a separate spring that makes the stick "idle" to the 3-4 side of the H. Of course this was missing, but I was able to find a suitable substitute at my local hardware store:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is a video that shows the lockout operation of this shifter:

Link


Since our shifter did not have a knob, and my son wanted one with a pattern on it, we got this EMPI knob:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The original plan was just to screw it on and be done. But of course the threads on the Hurst shifter are american 3/8-24, and the EMPI knob only had metric sizes in it. We secured a 3/8-24 coupling nut and used the belt sander and a drill to reduce its diameter and make the outside round:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The idea at this point is to drill out the EMPI knob's insert to accept the 3/8-24 insert and glue it in place. That all went to heck. Even though we left the EMPI knob in the vacuum pack plastic, and wrapped it in a cloth, in the vise, by the time the drilling was done the knob had slipped in the package, and this had messed up the vinyl covering on the knob. The whole thing ended up coming apart:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Sigh. We went ahead and glued the 3/8-24 insert into the now-drilled knob insert, using epoxy and a light press of the vise:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


After test-fitting the knob (without a cover) we decided the knob was too tall anyway. It was a bit of a stretch to get your finger down to the trigger. We cut some off the threaded insert, then made a stack-up to see how much the knob could be shortened:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


A quick trip to the farm-boy lathe:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Now the knob is quite a bit shorter (closer to the Hurst ball's shape) and is ready to cover. Note that there are four groves in the knob that the seams will recess into:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The local craft store had some leather working supplies, surprisingly cheap:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here the leather is on the knob inside-out, as I am trying to mark the shape that each of the quadrants needs to be. It took a couple of iterations, then a final trim of all four pieces stacked to make sure they are the same size and shape:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Once the shape is close, I stitched the leather inside-out tightly over the knob:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Right-side out again, and pull it over the knob, lining the seams up with the grooves in the knob. Now the inserts are ready to be glued and pressed back in:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Considering that I am a rank amateur leather-worker, I do not think the knob came out too horribly:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


At this point, the whole project came off the tracks. We installed the shifter in the chassis, sat in the seat and tried it out. We immediately found out why there is a short-straight version of this shifter, in contrast to this long-angled version. Maybe the long-angled one is made for a sand rail or something? In any case, pulling back to 2nd or 4th plants your elbow firmly on the seat back. Completely unusable. Frustrated, we decided to straighten and shorten it. If we messed it up we would just buy the correct version out of the classifieds and junk this one.

So we disassembled everything, heated a PVC pipe and slid it over the shaft to protect the finish. We put it in the press and straightened it as far as we could take it in one go. We then cut ~1 inch off the lower end of the shaft and re-drilled for the pin, and re-assembled.

With these modifications, you can shift it without bumping your elbow on the seat back, yet it still has a slight backwards rake.

We purchased a new rubber bellows/seal thing (a repair part for the EMPI knock-off). The vacuformed base was not in bad shape, but it had some odd light-colored spots on it. We gave it a light bead blasting, then shot it with some satin black Krylon "Fusion for Plastic" spray paint that is intended to bond well to plastics. Frankly it looks brand new. Hopefully it will hold up well over time:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is an image of the overall straightened/shortened shifter:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

_________________
1975 LaGrande Super Beetle Build Log / Farm boy hinge pin puller / Farm Boy Chassis Rotisserie
"I'm not getting older, I'm getting bitter."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
ErickS
Samba Member


Joined: May 08, 2013
Posts: 47
Location: Chesapeake, Va
ErickS is offline 

PostPosted: Sat Nov 02, 2013 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Your attention to detail is amazing. Love watching your progress.
_________________
1971 Super "Clementine"

http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=573554
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
75smith
Samba Member


Joined: July 09, 2011
Posts: 2275
Location: NH
75smith is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Nov 12, 2013 3:57 pm    Post subject: Re: Making Gas Door Release Inside Again Reply with quote

Bashr52 wrote:
baxsie wrote:
My 1972 flat window super 1302 had the gas door release inside the cabin, which was good. The 1973 - 1975 (and probably more) have spring loaded doors that you just open with your finger. Since the door does not protect from theft, locking gas caps are needed for those years. Locking gas caps suck.

Latch located in the body:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Tracks of the pin on the latch show good alignment:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Finished gas door.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Still need to run a control cable to a handle somewhere in the cabin. Another project for another day.


Cool~! Are you going to fill in the indent in the body for the old style door?


I would leave the detent, should it still be there, I have seen the spring break, making it a pain to open the door
_________________
My 1975 Beetle Build Updated 8-21-12

My engine build
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
baxsie
Samba Member


Joined: August 09, 2005
Posts: 602
Location: Eastern Washington State
baxsie is offline 

PostPosted: Sun Dec 22, 2013 9:38 pm    Post subject: Mounting Oil Cooler and AC Condenser Reply with quote

We got one to the Atomic Cool oil coolers from CB Performance. We decided to mount it and the ICE AC condenser ("helper" or "pre-condenser", the main condenser goes behind the grille way up front under the bumper) under the parcel tray, in the empty volume to each side of the transmission.

I have had some conflict whether this is the optimal location, and it probably is not. But, it is probably the best location given this particular build. Both heat exchangers have good electric fans on them, and our hope is that there will not be a "bubble" of hot air building up in this area under the car. If the car is moving, no worries . . . but if just idling on a hot day I am not sure the flow will work out. Time will tell.

Here is a test fit of the oil cooler, with the transmission in:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


That showed us that the bracket angle needed to be adjusted:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Another test fit with the transmission is out of the way:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


We then put the transmission back, and checked the heater tube clearance. Not great, but it should work:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is where the oil cooler brackets ended up (please ignore the horrible overhead welds):
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The AC condenser is a similar setup. ICE AC (apparently now out of business . . . great!) calls for mounting the AC condenser on the front of the fan shroud over the intake. So on the hottest days when you need AC the most, add some more load to the engine and then heat up the air going into the engine for good measure. No thank you. Instead we opted for two Derale 7" fans that fit pretty darn well on the condenser:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


We made two angle brackets that will screw to the condenser flange (and 3M VHB mounting tape for peace of mind), these brackets will bolt to the mounting brackets that are welded to to the body:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here are the parts of the AC bracket that are welded to the body:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


A parting shot of all the brackets:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Still need to work out how to plumb all that stuff up.
_________________
1975 LaGrande Super Beetle Build Log / Farm boy hinge pin puller / Farm Boy Chassis Rotisserie
"I'm not getting older, I'm getting bitter."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
baxsie
Samba Member


Joined: August 09, 2005
Posts: 602
Location: Eastern Washington State
baxsie is offline 

PostPosted: Sun Dec 22, 2013 11:40 pm    Post subject: Making the Front Fenders Wider -- "Easy" Method Reply with quote

We have really been searching for a solution to the tires/wheels being too wide for the stock fenders. We thought about fiberglass, but my body guy nixed that. Well, he might have second thoughts after seeing this post Smile

It seems that most fender widening project involve inserting a strip of metal into the fender. Fair enough, we even bought a strip of metal the correct width. Then it occurred to us that we have the old fenders to use. So our plan was to use a strip of the old fender, and combine that with the new fender. How hard could it be . . . I've seen a guy with a MULLET doing it after all Smile

We needed 1 1/2 inches minimum, and there was a roll of 2" masking tape . . . so we bolted up the old fender and marked off 2":
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


We then used a air hacksaw (affectionately known in our shop as the Noisy Cricket) to cut along the edge of the tape:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Then there were many, many test fits interspersed with head scratching:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


In the end the full 2" (less the ~1/4 to ~3/8: flange) is used from the lower front to the top (at the blinker). From the blinker to the running board it tapers gown to ~1". We marked a line intersecting a blinker mounting hole on the old fender, and made that intersect the same hole on the new fender. Hoping to avoid a repeat of the Shannen-Doherty problem:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Once we thought the test fit looked good, we put one of those step flanges on the lip of the old fender:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The seam lays pretty darn flat here:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


We left the bumper opening in the old fender, so that the position of that did not get hosed. It is not obvious how the opening of the new fender maps to the old fender -- witness the many lines in different colors:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The complex curve around the headlight gives a little grumpiness:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


On to the initial tack welds:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Pressing the fender into the flanged step while the boy tack welded worked pretty well and solved most of the front grumpiness:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


We did end up with a pucker on the first fender. Relieving it with a slice from the Noisy Cricket calmed it down:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


At this point, I took a quick cell-phone video of the first fender. It is portrait mode, sorry:

Link


Now that we are old pros at it, of course the second fender went smoother and qiucker and came out nicer Smile Interestingly, there was no grumpiness at the compex curve near the headlight. Taping and cutting:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Removing the bolt falnge from the new fender:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Test fit:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Flanging:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Tack Welding:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is anoother quick cell-phone video of the second fender. Landscape mode FTW:

Link


Here are a couple shots of the under-side of the second fender. We will add more welds here:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Video showing what happens on the back side of one of the welds:

Link


And here is the money shot. Needs some finish work and bondo, but I think it is pretty darn good for a couple farm boys:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

_________________
1975 LaGrande Super Beetle Build Log / Farm boy hinge pin puller / Farm Boy Chassis Rotisserie
"I'm not getting older, I'm getting bitter."


Last edited by baxsie on Sun Feb 09, 2014 9:14 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
baxsie
Samba Member


Joined: August 09, 2005
Posts: 602
Location: Eastern Washington State
baxsie is offline 

PostPosted: Thu Jan 23, 2014 9:07 pm    Post subject: Adding Recessed Hella Micro DE Projector Fog Lights Reply with quote

We are getting a little closer on the fenders, and now it is time to tackle installing the fog lights. Here is a link to the lights we have:
http://www.amazon.com/HELLA-H13090611-Micro-Series-Halogen/dp/B00042K39C/
http://www.myhellalights.com/index.php/default/auxiliary-lamps/halogen-lamps/micro-de-series/

We also got the "PIAA 13556 H3 Style Plasma Ion Crystal Yellow" bulbs, because where I come from, fog lights should be yellow:
http://www.amazon.com/13556-Plasma-Crystal-Yellow-110-Watt/dp/B00067BV96
http://www.piaa.com/store/p/44-H3-Plasma-Ion-Yellow-Twin-Pack-Halogen-Bulbs.aspx

One of my big beefs with fog lights is that they typically look "added on" and also often have a horribly soft cutoff.

The hella projectors have a very nice, sharp cutoff on their own, plus we mounted them so the lower lip of the bumper will shadow the top of the light slightly, reducing the slight "overspray" of light that is above the cutoff line.

To make them not look "added on" we purchased some 3 1/2" exhaut pipe at our local Napa store, and marked the location:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


We then cut out a central hole, and radially cut to the outside marked line:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


We took a short piece of the 3 1/2" pipe, cut a slice out of the side, and "shrunk" it until it would fit inside the tabs. Then wile holding it straight and level,we marked it:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


And then cut it:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Now we have a template of the end profile that will match up with the fender's curve. Notice that we used the welded seam of the exhaust pipe to indicate the center top. Slip the smaller, split pipe inside the final piece of pipe and mark the profile:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Cut the outer pipe along the line, discard the inner marker pipe, then we can slip the pipe over the tabs from the abck side and tack weld it in place, checking for level and straight:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


At this point we checked the fit by spacing the light in the pipe with some folded cardboard:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


We then welded the tabs to the inside of the pipe, and cut & drilled some mounting tabs. The bolts that come with the lights are self-tapping affairs that I am not fond of. Since this photo we have re-tapped the holes in the lamp body with 1/4-20 at full depth, and have nice stainless screws to hold the, together:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is a shot from the front. There is a lot more metal finishing needed, of course. You can see the dichroic yellow and blue hints from the PIAA bulb. The clearance around the bulb should allow air to blow over it and keep it cool:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


A shot from the back. The extended pipe will protect the lamp from gravel thrown by the wheel. It appears to have plenty of clearance to the tire, even though the pipe looks really long:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is our quick check to see if they are even close to symetrical:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


We still need to do the final metal work, then 2K primer and the bondo. (Why am I so embarassed to say "bondo"? It will not be very thick and I am just not that good of a metal worker to make it perfect without filler.)

In other news, we picked up a "basket case" 1975:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


We went to the place to look at the doors and the hood, but they were not much better than the ones we had. Supposedly the engine was running when it was parked (he was gonna "fix up" the car). After talking a bit we decided to go ahead and get it for parts. Not that we need more parts. Wait . . . why did we drag this thing home?

We thought we could sell the engine, transmission, speedometer, seats, wheels, starter, fuel tank, rack&pinion and whatever else was not ruined and come out about even - we paid $280 for the whole pile and there is a second load in the back of the pickup, not shown here.

One nice thing is that the engine (likely original, rebuilt only once according to the stack of receipts and original owners manual) appears to be complete, and will turn over. There is the computer for it, injectors and the works:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


On closer inspection, the engine gave up a potential nice little surprise: an AS-21 case:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Also nice: 4 matching serial numbers and a clear title. And it is the Ancona blue that he decided to go with. So if we were willing to swap pans we could have a "original" restore. Something to think about.

Comments welcome. Should we have left it to rust?
_________________
1975 LaGrande Super Beetle Build Log / Farm boy hinge pin puller / Farm Boy Chassis Rotisserie
"I'm not getting older, I'm getting bitter."


Last edited by baxsie on Sun Feb 02, 2014 9:16 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Walking Contradiction
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2013
Posts: 452
Location: Oregon, OH
Walking Contradiction is offline 

PostPosted: Thu Jan 23, 2014 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't feel bad about using Bondo. Almost every professional body shop uses body filler for the finishing touches on a repair. It's nearly impossible to get a panel perfectly straight like you are describing. Bondo gets a bad rap because it is often used incorrectly. As long as it is never applied more than 1/8'' thick you should have no problems.

-Sam
_________________
Orange Bug 1974 Super Beetle

Member of the Greater Toledo Volkswagen Club
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic    Forum Index -> Beetle - Late Model/Super - 1968-up All times are Mountain Standard Time/Pacific Daylight Savings Time
Page: Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 13, 14, 15 ... 24, 25, 26  Next
Jump to:
Page 14 of 26

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

About | Help! | Advertise | Donate | Premium Membership | Privacy/Terms of Use | Contact Us | Site Map
Copyright © 1996-2020, Everett Barnes. All Rights Reserved.
Not affiliated with or sponsored by Volkswagen of America | Forum powered by phpBB