Hello! Log in or Register   |  Help  |  Donate  |  Buy Shirts  See all banner ads | Advertise on TheSamba.com  
TheSamba.com
 
My First VW, It's a 69 Bay Window Deluxe
Page: Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
Forum Index -> Bay Window Bus Share: Facebook Twitter
Reply to topic
Print View
Quick sort: Show newest posts on top | Show oldest posts on top View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 103
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Fri Feb 06, 2015 1:32 am    Post subject: Case Work/Mods Reply with quote

I have chiseled out some time from my schedule to get back to working on the engine. Finishing the engine would be a huge milestone for this project. After taking apart the PO engine the only thing that was worth reusing was the case. Everything else had to be replaced. There are a couple of mods that I wanted to do to the engine/case to help improve the reliability of the engine. These include the following.

1. Replace the pressed in oil galley plugs with NPT plugs
2. Full flow mod and adding an oil filter
3. Bob Hoovers HVX mods
4. Add additional diagnostics including oil temp, oil pressure, cylinder head temp (for cylinder #3), air fuel mixture

If you haven't had a chance to check out Bob Hoovers articles, you should. There is some good reading there.

http://bobhooversblog.blogspot.com/2007/05/hvx-mods.html

The HVX mods essentially improve oil flow to the right side of the engine and the both sides of the valve train.

With a stock case, the right side of the case only gets oil flow through the #2 cam journal, on to the cam followers, and up to the rockers. You can improve oil flow by extending the oil galley to the #3 cam journal and cross drilling the the cam journal to the oil galley. Based on the serial number and the fact that my case has dual pressure relief ports, my case is a '71. Extending the oil galley may not be possible on all cases, depending on the mold for the case. For mine, it was possible. However, I have heard of people drilling through their cases, not taking the precaution of measuring first and then drilling.

Here I am extending the oil galley to the #3 cam journal with a 12" long 7/32 drill bit. You have to remove the galley plug on the front of the engine to do this.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


In this image, I have cross drilled the #3 journal to the oil galley. This should effectively double the oil flow to the left side of the case.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I still need to open up the channels that allow oil to flow around the cam bearing from the left side to the right side of the case.

The next mod to the cases was to remove all the oil galley plugs, tap the case for NPT plugs, and replace the pressed in plugs with threaded plugs. This is suppose to help with minimizing the risk of an oil leak due to a plug coming loose. For my situation, I had to remove the plugs to do the full flow mod, adding the ail temp gauge, and extending the oil galleys so this was kind of a gimmie.

There are a variety of plugs in the case. They can be replaced with a combination of 1/16, 1/8, 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2 NPT plugs. Here is a chart showing what NPT plugs are required for each face of the case.

_______Rear____Front___Top
1/16 ___1 ______3_______0
1/8_____0______1_______0
1/4_____1______0_______1
3/8_____2______1_______0
1/2_____1______0_______0

The rear of the case has special requirements.

The 1/16 plug needs to be long and machined to a specific diameter to match the diameter of the original plug. This regulates the oil flow to the #4 crank bearing journal. I haven't addressed this part yet. There are a couple of ways of creating this restriction. I am tempted to make the part from scratch.

The 1/2 NPT plug is actually where I am planning on putting my oil temp gauge. This is the last point on the case before the oil pump and then onto the oil filter. From what I have read, this is the best place to take the temp as the oil is probably going to be the hottest here.

One of the 3/8 ports is not for a plug but for the return from the oil filter. All of the holes for the plugs can be drilled, reamed, and tapped by hand with the exception of this one. For this plug, the galley is offset from the plug. So if you try to open it up with a drill it catches and is off center from the original plug. It must be drilled out and centered before reaming and tapped. Instead of fussing with a hand drill I threw the case on the mill and centered and opened up the hole with a 1/2" end-mill.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


After opening up the hole. I then clearances the area for my elbow fitting.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is the case with the final tapped hole for oil filter return

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here you can see some of the additional tapped plug holes in the top and rear of the case.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here you can see the clearance required for the elbow fitting for the oil return

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


In this photo the hole in the 12-o-clock position will be tapped for 1/2 NPT plug. This is where I will install the oil temp gauge

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is the oil pump cover plate mocked up with the mustache bar. There is no interference. However, I will need to install an elbow to plumb the cover plate, and will probably have to notch the mustache bar.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


In doing the full flow mod, you need to the block off the oil pump outlet. I picked up a full flow kit from one of the shops which included a new oil pump. However it needed to be tapped for a 1/4 NPT plug.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


In doing this, you have to make sure that the plug sits below the surface of the Pump body diameter.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


As a measure of redundancy. I also tapped the oil galley in the case to plug that off as well.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


With that, the case is almost done. I need to do the last 1/2 NPT tapped hole then soda/sand blast the case, run it through the dishwasher for a final cleaning and start putting things together.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Tcash
Samba Member


Joined: July 20, 2011
Posts: 11912
Location: San Jose, California, USA
Tcash is offline 

PostPosted: Fri Feb 06, 2015 5:27 am    Post subject: Fuel sender access hole measurements Reply with quote

What are the a-b measurements if you don't mind me asking?
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Thanks
Tcash[/quote]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jeff Geisen
Samba Chaplain


Joined: December 21, 2004
Posts: 1491
Location: N.W. Georgia
Jeff Geisen is offline 

PostPosted: Fri Feb 06, 2015 7:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Get rid of that sunroof! Rolling Eyes
_________________
I Corinthians 4:3

Pictures from my cross-country road trips are at: http://instagram.com/jeff.pop.geisen

I actually drive my bus, and I maintain it myself, it runs fine. I don't merely own a bus.
I travel all over in it. Really, check my instagram link.

71 Westy rag top, 69 single cab
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Instagram Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 103
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2015 4:33 pm    Post subject: I'm still making progress Reply with quote

Just an update to the project. I still owe Tcash those dimensions.

I have been taking my time with the engine build but it's coming along. I wasted alot of time trying to clean the case. i started with every chemical known to man to degrease it then I soda blasted the two halves and finally ran it through the dish washer several times in various orientations to get all the residual soda powder out.

Here is a before
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is an after
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


With the case clean, I could start assembling the short block. If only it were that easy. I am following the Wilson book for the build and it seem like every step of the way I find myself having to modify parts to make them to my liking. Which is fine, I have been having fun geeking out over the build. I have been lucky in that all of my purchased parts have met specs/tolerances.

I took photos along the way and will post in more detail later. Once the case halves were together I set the crank endplay to .0025" I know this is on the tight side but my logic was that things would loosen up during break in. I can always go back an change it.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I am out of time but will post more on the build later tonight.


Last edited by Jack_O_Trades on Wed May 20, 2015 6:19 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 103
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2015 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In parallel with the engine build, I have started planning on the interior work. I started searching for missing and replacement interior pieces. The rear of the seats have been butchered and I will eventually have to weld in replacement pieces from a donor bus.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I have also been on the lookout for the deluxe trim pads that go behind the seats. I found the side pieces and am now looking for the top pieces.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The original dash pad strip had a single crack when I pulled if from the bus. It's been sitting in my garage for the last 7 months and one crack turned into four-five. I think it dried out in my garage over that period.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I have been looking for a replacement for awhile and found one earlier this year that was in good condition. Unfortunately the USPS decided that the package would fit in their trucks better if they shipped it in the shape of an "L". And, they were kind enough to tape it up for me. So I am still in the market for an un-cracked dash pad. I have talked to Just Dashes and have a quote for $300 to repair one but I'm going to hold out til the end of the year to see if I can find one.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I was looking at my ignition switch and it looked a little jankey with the switch being held in place with a large retaining nut and backed with a piece of plywood. I was pretty sure this wasn't OEM. I wasn't sure if the hole was stock size or if it had been opened up. What's odd, is the ignition key is the same key that it used with the doors.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


A found this assembly complete and it should do the job. I will blast the housing and powder coat it. Unfortunately it won't have the warning text about the sliding door.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


About seven months ago I also pulled the windshield to repair the lip under the seal. I fixed it painted it and went to install the windshield. The windshield which is original German VW glass was fine when it came out but ended up picking up a vertical crack through one layer along the way. This was frustrating to say the least. I went ahead and installed it as an exercise. It was a pretty easy process. There is something to be said about the beauty of new window seals. In the photo you can't see the crack but it's there. I also didn't install the deluxe trim because at the time I didn't realize that you have to do this before you install the window.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I found a dealer on Ebay that is selling PWG glass with various local pick-ups around the country. There happens to be one in Santa Clara. The windshield was only $99 so not too bad. The fit was less than to be desired for. Instead of being oversized from the complaints I have read about, I found the two lower corners to be short on material leaving a gap. I had to work at pushing the windshield down and the seal into the corners. I think it's OK but I can still see space between the lip of the seal and the body if I look closely. Time will tell. I also installed the deluxe trim. It's tricky but not too bad once you get the hang of it. I watched a you-tube video on how to do it before trying it.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I had been looking for a second set of wheels. I found a complete set on craigslist with tires and hub caps. I also picked up a set of Hankooks RA08's which just showed up today. I picked these up on Amazon for $86 a tire with free shipping which is the lowest price I have seen around. I will be sending out the wheels and tires out to Les Schwab to get the wheels powder coated and the Hankooks mounted.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 103
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2015 10:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Onto the engine build.

I tried to take photos along the way. I guess that kind of establishes a timeline so that is how I will present it here.

Backing up a little bit. In doing my full flow mod I had to notch the mustache bar and the tin behind the pulley.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here are the fittings mocked up

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


And here is the clearance with the mustache bar

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The crankshaft assembled and ready to drop into the case

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The crank and camshaft installed. Backlash is around .001" - .002". I have been using lucas assembly lube for bearing surface and moly grease in other areas like the tappets and push rods.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Timing marks aligned

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is the o-ring sealed camshaft case plug. Hope it works.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Misc engine photos for posterity

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I used Yamabond to seal up the two case halves. When I was tightening up the perimeter nuts two of the studs pulled out the threads. The threads on this case are pretty worn out. I have had to install about a dozen M8 heli-coils. I know this isn't the correct fix but these were installed before I was aware and I am determined to get some use out of this case even if it means learning from my mistakes.

For the pulled stud, I opted to install a heli-coil in situe instead of splitting the two halves. To do this, I had to weld extensions onto my heli-coil tap and tap drill. After that it was pretty straight forward.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The engine bolted together. I later on realized that the copper plated nuts were for the exhaust and replaced them with zinc plated nuts. I have also purchased brass nuts for the exhaust per Mr. Hoovers recommendation.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Dual relief valves installed

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Head studs installed

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I had problems with the studs for the sump plate. Some of then were loose. I found some 8mm to 6mm studs and drilled and tapped the 6mm holes for 8mm using a tapered tap. The idea was that the stud would thread into the hole and get tight at the tapered portion of the tapped hole. Now the stud should stay put and actually function as a stud instead of come out with the nut every time I pull the strainer.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


With the case halves together it was time for the oil pump installation. First I needed to plug the supply port to the oil galley.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


All the parts for the pump ready to install

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The outlet port of the pump blocked off and below the surface of the mating diameter.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


And it looks like I am missing a photo of the actual pump installed....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
vwinnovator
Samba Member


Joined: July 11, 2005
Posts: 907
Location: Still doing it in the back of your VW
vwinnovator is offline 

PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2015 5:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hey, I just salvaged two (drivers/passengers) walk through bulkheads from a '69 I'm parting out.
hit me up if you interested.
Full metal and all pads.

send me pics of your rear seat areas too, as I'm cutting out as much usable metal from the shell as possible.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Tcash
Samba Member


Joined: July 20, 2011
Posts: 11912
Location: San Jose, California, USA
Tcash is offline 

PostPosted: Mon Aug 17, 2015 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Making any headway?
Tcash
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 103
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Fri Sep 18, 2015 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tcash wrote:
Making any headway?
Tcash


Yes, much progress has been made I have continuously been working on the bus, just haven't been posting about it. I finished building the engine, installed it, and ran the bus for awhile. I was/am having problems with the engine running lean from idle to ~2000 RPM. I have an AFM on the engine so it's very easy to see what's going on. I assume the problem is a jetting issue, as everything else has been setup properly for a 34 Pict-3 carb. To address the issue, I picked up some jets to play around with and I purchased a genuine rebuilt German carburetor from Tim at VolkzBitz (just incase I can't the the EMPI carb to play well). I haven't had a chance to play with it because I tore down the bus to do the body work and paint it.

On with the story, This will be a quick recap over the last couple of months. I have more photos of the process if someone is interested.

Here is the finished engine sitting in the garage.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Getting ready to install into the bus. I picked up a transmission jack from HF to do this job. It's nicer than a motorcycle lift because it has built in tip tilt so you can get it perfectly aligned with the transmission before mating the two up. What would typically be a two person job can be done with one person in about an hour.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I was proud of myself for finding every last piece of tin for this engine. Airhead parts had the piece of tin that covers to pulley bolt.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


So clean and pretty...

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


When I went to put oil in the engine, I had a massive leak. Turns out, I missed a 1/16 plug on the front of the engine. Easy fix.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Oil Filter installed

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I pulled the dash to clean up everything

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Here are the pods for my additional gauges. I added Tach, AFM, CHT, Oil Temp, Oil Pressure Clock, and Voltmeter


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


In doing the doghouse conversion, I didn't realize there were differences in the firewall tin until after the engine was installed. Because this tin was only offered for one year, it's hard to find. I decided to add tin to my existing doghouse tin.

Doghouse vs original

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Tin piece to be added to doghouse tin

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


And done

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is the engine installed and wired up

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Dash cleaned and reinstalled

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


New gages

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


As I mentioned in an earlier post, somebody hacked my walk through bulkheads. I bought the pair from vwinnovator and installed them. I first had to cut out the original, then remove the section I wanted from the NOS, and weld in the NOS.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


That was about as far as I got. I drove the bus around for awhile. I had a small oil weep from the oil pump plate. I never saw oil on the ground just drops forming on the bottom of the oil pump cover. About a month ago, I started tearing apart the bus so I could paint it.

I recently ran into some problems with the city. I have worked on my bus in my driveway for the last year and was storing it in a temporary garage/tent in the driveway, out of sight. I guess my "awesome" neighbors didn't like that and complained. Turns out I was in violation of some ordinance which I have yet to be explained satisfactorily to me so I had to get the bus inside.

This required that I tear apart my shop, moving all my woodworking equipment out, making room for the bus. I went from this

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


To this

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


It's tight, but I think I can work on the bus in the space I have. I have lived in this house for almost 11 years. This is the first time I have ever put a vehicle in my garage.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The body work is mostly done. I pulled as much of the dents as I could, and used as little filler as possible. Any rust has been removed and patched/welded. I am using Duraglass for most of the filler, direct to metal, because it is water proof.I will then finish stripping and primer with epoxy primer, finish off the body work, primer, and finish with single stage Delta Green. the roof was painted last year and good to go.
The sand blasting is pretty messy so I am planning to pull the engine and dash to prevent contamination/damage before doing any more stripping.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Tcash
Samba Member


Joined: July 20, 2011
Posts: 11912
Location: San Jose, California, USA
Tcash is offline 

PostPosted: Fri Sep 18, 2015 3:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Note how the Exhaust tip (tail pipe) has a bend in it. This is for a split window. The bay one is straight.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=637380&highlight=211+251+237

Watch the fuel hose clamp screw is going to wear a hole in the plug wire.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Looking really good.
Good luck
Tcash
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
secretsubmariner
Champagne Wrangler


Joined: January 08, 2011
Posts: 2857
Location: Tulsa, OK
secretsubmariner is offline 

PostPosted: Sat Sep 19, 2015 5:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shocked

Looks great Jack. Gosh that engine looks fantastic.

I really liked the gauge pod you whipped up, too. Very classy.
_________________
-Tony
1978 Champagne Edition II (Mar)
1978 Champagne Edition II (Feb - sold)
1978 Champagne Edition II (Jan - sold)
1978 Westfalia Auto Deluxe (sold)

78Kombi wrote:
dude but im a nigerian prince
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Instagram Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Bala
Samba Member


Joined: December 04, 2003
Posts: 2545
Location: Austin, TX
Bala is offline 

PostPosted: Mon Sep 21, 2015 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Awesome, all of it.
I may have missed it, but what are you interior plans? Some kind of custom camper? If so, I'll be excited to see how your wood working skills come in to play.
_________________
1976 Westy

1966 Beetle
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Gallery Classifieds Feedback
The Dubbernaut
Samba Member


Joined: June 01, 2011
Posts: 134
Location: Kennewick, Wa
The Dubbernaut is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2017 10:20 am    Post subject: Re: Just Picked Up My First VW, It's a 69 Type 2 Reply with quote

Any updates on the interior!?! This thread was amazing, especially since the photo links still work! Laughing
_________________
2012 Tiguan 4motion
2 Corrado's
3 Beetle's
76 Bus
2 Baja's
66 Pigalle Squareback
80 Rabbit
80 Rabbit Pickup
and still collecting!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Facebook Instagram Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 103
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 10:13 am    Post subject: Re: Just Picked Up My First VW, It's a 69 Type 2 Reply with quote

Last fall I came back to this and realized it had been more than two years since I had touched the bus.

I also noticed that all my photo links died. So in addition to reviving my project, I will also be reviving this thread.

I am in the process of uploading my photos to the gallery and I guess I will need to go through the thread to edit the posts.

As far as the bus work goes, I am still doing body work. The nose of the bus had some collision damage that I have been working through. and I am starting to work around to the rest of the bus.

To keep it fun, I have also been tuning the engine, re-jetting the carb to get good A/F mixtures across the range of RPM's

I have also been catching up on some of the other build threads which have been inspirational to me getting off my ass and getting this project at least derivable if not finished.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 103
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 7:05 pm    Post subject: Re: My First VW, It's a 69 Bay Window Deluxe Reply with quote

Here are some photos of the state of the bus as of today. I need to finish the body work, finish stripping the paint, and take care of some rust issues. Then I can spray it and start putting it back together.

I've been driving it up and down the street about once a week just to keep the engine fresh and get the engine oil up to temp. I've also been running a dehumidifier in the garage to keep the moisture down to try and mitigate flash rust with all the exposed metal.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



I had to Frankenstein the passenger seat pedestal. The PO had hacked it up to create more storage space. I also had to source and install the proper seat brackets.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



I also got around to reupholstering the front seats with some covers that I picked up awhile ago.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



It's hard to tell with all the crap but I also assembled a z-bed kit the I picked up. This thing is a POS and I would never recommend it to anyone. I will eventually fab up my own mechanism.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 103
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 9:16 pm    Post subject: Re: My First VW, It's a 69 Bay Window Deluxe Reply with quote

I have been busy on the this project. I took advantage of the 3-day weekend to get some body work done and place a couple of orders for long lead parts and other miscellaneous parts that I don't remember being available two years ago.

I received my West Coast Metric order today. I started this project buying most of my stuff through CIP1. In general, I think they are an OK vendor. However the quality of most of the stuff is sub par. I am now finding myself reordering stuff trying to get better German quality parts. I was pleased with the parts that I ordered from West Coast. Even for simple things like the windshield washer jets, there is a huge difference between CIP1 and West Coast.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I picked up some bow ends for the headliner bows. In parallel I found these silicon ones from McMaster

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I ordered a new headliner from Goliners on eBay. I hope these are better than the TMI ones. I also ordered an interior panel kit for Jbugs.

And a crimper kit for reterminating all of the oxidized connectors in the bus.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I started to design the interior. I'm going for a camper that can seat my four kids and the two parents. I would also like to have the rear bench seat fold down into a bed.

I have uploaded quite a few photos but still need to fix the links in this build thread.

https://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/album_search.php?search_author=Jack_O_Trades

My motivation is to get this bus ready for the camping season this summer. We'll see if I can stay on track.

I started working on the fresh air vent flaps. They would have to be pulled for painting anyways and they were looking kind of sad. I was going to try to minimize my work on these because I wasn't sure if the seals were available. Turns out West Coast Metric has a kit for these!

http://www.westcoastmetric.com/i-22968839-211-098.html

So I decided to do a full strip-down. I tried my hand at chemical stripping with some stuff I found at Walmart. It wasn't as aggressive as I hoped but it sure did a number on my Nitrile gloves. I ordered some aircraft stripper and hope this does a better job.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


When I was pulling the sunroof pan, I noticed that these dampers for the rear hatch torsion springs were crumbling. These go between the two springs and I assume they help reduce any noice and/or rubbing between these two springs. I don't know what these are called. I assume they are probably no longer available (if ever) so I am planning on picking up some vulcanized rubber and water jetting a couple of replacements.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I also started to work on my gas cap hatch. The previous-previous owner had drilled a nasty hole for a lock. I'm working on deleting the hole. With most of the work done, I need to sand blast the assembly and sand the filler.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


My blast cabinet has been sitting outside for the last three years and was falling apart so I spent the weekend restoring this as well, so that I could use it. I also ran into a problem with my powder coat oven where the some rats got in and chewed up the ribbon wire for the control panel. A new part cost more than the oven is worth so I need to try to fix this as well.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 103
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Feb 27, 2018 2:02 pm    Post subject: Re: My First VW, It's a 69 Bay Window Deluxe Reply with quote

I'm pretty sure I know the answer to this from my own research but I just wanted to confirm that 1/2" holes near the engine hatch hinges are not from the factory. I am planning on deleting them in the next couple of days.

Thanks

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Also, does anyone have a good source for the plugs that go in the lower holes?

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 103
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 12:45 am    Post subject: Re: My First VW, It's a 69 Bay Window Deluxe Reply with quote

So, I have been a busy bee. I am really trying to get this bus ready for the summer. I set a deadline to finally get it painted the week after Easter. I even put in at work to take the week off to paint it. That leaves me about four weeks to finish the body work (mostly done now) sand it, Clean it, and prep it. It' a tight schedule but I think it's manageable.

Addressing the random holes form the previous post, I went ahead and filled them in as the were not functional and looking at other peoples buses, they are not original.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Last year, I drilled out the sliding door rail cover mounting strip, or the SDRCMS if your into acronyms, because I noticed some rust behind it. With the part off, I sand blasted it, and wire brushed the body. I treated everything with Ospho, wire brushed again, and sprayed with weld through primer. I then filled in the holes I put in the body and welded the SDRCMS back onto the body.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I also played around with mounting the panel as people have expressed issues with getting everything together with the clamping strip, the seal, and the panel. Skills had mentioned in one of the thread that there used to be clips to hold the clamping strip in place. I see the notches for the clips but my clips were also non-exsistant. I found that the clips used to help keep the 1 quart paint can lids on during shipping were a perfect fit and made the installation trivial. I will post photos when I go to do the final installation.

In another thread, I have been working on my sunroof pan. I am almost done with it, where I can weld it back in. This however is independent of getting the bus painted. I am planning on spraying the bus upto the inside of the door jambs. At that point I will transition to the original paint/touched up paint.

Asside from the sunroof, the bus is in really great shape as far as rust gets. At least that's what I keep convincing my self of.

I may revisit the interior but I am really tired of just having the bus sit around and want to get it back on the road. looking at the photos from when I first started working on it, my two boys were 2 and 4 and are now 6 and 8 respectively. I also have two more kids that weren't even around when I started this project. it kind of puts things into perspective and that memories should be made in the enjoyment of the bus instead of striving for perfection thus never finishing the project. I guess that is my compromise that I am willing to accept.

This weekend I took the first major step to getting it painted (aside from all the body work that is virtually finished). I gutted the bus. I started by pulling the engine/transmission as a unit. That was pretty straight forward and I actually have enough room in my garage to wheel it out with the garage door shut (it was raining on this day). I then proceeded to remove all the doors and went a step further and removed the remaining glass from the doors. I also started to dig into the dash. I had started stripping the bus with glass bead blasting at one point in 2015 and the media was everywhere in all the nooks and crannies. I wasn't going to pull the dash but decided it needed to be done to give it a proper cleaning. This would also make it easier when I am ready to clean up the wiring.

Here she is in all of her glory

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


As a small side project I started digging into one of the vent windows. This one is from the sliding door. It has the typical rust/rot in the lower corner.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I went ahead and drilled out the rivets holding the two frame pieces together

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I then sandblasted the two parts and treated them with Ospho. I will eventually finish these off with black powder coat.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I did make an attempt to weld in some of the holes from the rot.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The Lower pivot looks like it was peened in. It has worked itself loose over the years so I decide to weld it in.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


This chrome frame cleaned up nicely

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The collection of parts that make up the vent window (missing a couple of key elements).

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I accidentally drilled out the upper pivot thinking this was necessary to remove the window. it doesn't look like this riveted pivot is available. I will have to machine another part and re-rivet it in. Searching through The Samba the information to rebuild these windows is sparse and spread out over a dozen threads. When I get to the proper rebuild of these windows, I'm thinking I might do a detailed how-to thread.

I recieved some more goodies from Wolfsburg West. This is becoming my favorite place to shop second to Amazon.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


One hard to find part that I'm looking for are the little plastic caps that cover the screws on the dash. These caps exist in other location in the bus like the rear panels and a larger version securing the parking brake bracket to the dash. I haven't found original hardware but I did find a company making a similar product that's pretty damn close. They also offer the the caps in a good variety of colors. OEM on the right, new similar on the left.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Through digging into the body work on this bus I have discovered what appears to be three different collisions. The first and most obvious was the front drivers corner that pushed in the headlight can, and bent the door and frame. the second one I found was due to a failed paint job along the passenger side that ran the length of the vehicle. This was a side-swipe that was never pulled out but instead filled in with body filler. The third looks like a rear end collision in the middle of the vehicle that dented the rear bumper, apron, and engine hatch. I have been messing around with fixing the nice concave curves to the various parts. The most challenging has bee the apron. In hind sight, I should have just drilled out the internal stiffener and hammered out the dent. Instead I took the hard road.

I started with the typical pullers but they weren't doing much. They kept tearing out the material.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


So then I stepped up my game. I kind of made a mess of the part but I got most of the dent out.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Hikelite
Samba Member


Joined: August 31, 2012
Posts: 378
Location: Chattaroy, WA
Hikelite is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2018 9:15 am    Post subject: Re: My First VW, It's a 69 Bay Window Deluxe Reply with quote

Looks like its coming along nicely. I hope you make your goal of using it this summer. I have the same goal. You will be in paint before me though. :p

I have to straighten a bent apron too. Hopefully I won't have to use the same methods you did Wink
_________________
~Kevin

My 1968 Campmobile She is drivable again!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 103
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 12:37 am    Post subject: Re: My First VW, It's a 69 Bay Window Deluxe Reply with quote

So I keep making progress on the sunroof pan and the body work in parallel. This being my first car that I have ever restored/painted. I wanted to do it right.

I have always been at a loss for a good workflow on getting the body work done and getting it painted while managing rust, flash rust, body repairs, limited working windows for epoxy primer, urethane, etc....

There is a lot of information out there and I have been researching this topic for the last two years. Some of it is good advice but most is not.

At some point I decided to go with SPI products. They are reasonably priced, good quality, and the have top notch customer service. I can text or call (during business hours) and get Barry, the owner of the company to answer my typical NOOB questions.

https://www.southernpolyurethanes.com

So my original plan was to strip the bus down to metal, do the body work and the paint it. I started the stripping and body work two years ago. This has been the biggest hang up. I was mostly working on the nose and passenger side of the vehicle. After two years I was dealing with fighting off the rust, even though it's is stored in my garage, we are a couple miles from the ocean and we've actually been getting rain here that last couple of years. I did a little research on rust and decided I would try to control my garage environment. I picked up a dehumidifier and have had it running for the last four months while I try to finish stripping and doing the body work. It's seems to work. The dehumidifier pulls about 2 gallons of water out of the air every day, and my hydrometer says that the garage is "dry" with a good relative humidity reading (note, this is dependent upon temperature).

With the finish line of getting the bus painted, visible on the horizon , I've been jamming along. I was still seeing some flash rust though so I wanted to take it a step further and try to stop this with Ospho. Come to find out that epoxy primers do not play well with Ospho or any other acid treatments for the matter. You have to actively neutralize the acid by washing it off. With Ospho, if you let it dry, you have to reactivate it with more Ospho and rinse it off with water to completely neutralize it.

So, before I learned this, I went ahead and used Ospho on the nose. In doing so, I had some bleed into the body filler which acts like a sponge and traps the Ospho. After doing some more research on Ospho and the problems it can cause, I decided I was going to neutralize it and get the nose into epoxy primer. This whole time I have been avoiding priming the bus because I didn't want to have to re-scuff it if I were to fall out of the 7 day window. In the end though, this is the right way to do it as you will get the body sealed up from moisture and no longer have to chase the rust.

So, that's what I set out to do. In a conversation with Barry, he said that if you did get Ospho on the filler, You would need to strip back the filler. I have spent sooo much time on the nose that I couldn't bring myself to strip the filler. At this point I have nothing to loose. I decided I would get the nose in epoxy primer and if the bond failed, then I would have to redo the filler. On one hand I might get a good bond to the filler. On the other hand If I have to strip the filler then I will get a good bond of the epoxy to metal. So I guess this is more of an experiment with a slim chance of success to see how the epoxy primer does. The conditions were no where near ideal for spraying in my garage with all the dust in my "dirty" shop. But it did OK.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Moving forward, as I work around the bus doing the final stripping sanding, and feathering, I will get each panel into epoxy ASAP. This will buy me some time with the rust and worst case, I have to go back and scuff it up with 180. I will also keep an eye on the nose and probably do some destructive testing to see if I can get the primer to peel off.

As far as dust control without a booth, I'm not too worried as I will be doing some minor body work and applying the urethane primer (which will get block sanded) in a couple of weeks. When I get to this stage, I will build a booth in my garage and do a thorough cleaning before spraying.

On to the Next (for lack of a better Segway)

When I gutted the bus and pulled off the belt-line body trim pieces towards the rear of the bus, I noticed a fair amount of rust between the body and the support rails for the trim pieces. even though there is a piece of plastic stripping that is supposed to seal off this area, it's still looks like an ideal spot to collect water and wick it between the body and the support rail. I decided that once treated, I would apply some seam sealer to the seam between the body and the rail.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Ending the day, it's nice to see the bus in some paint, even if it is just primer. It nice me some encouragement to keep busting my ass to get this girl painted.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic    Forum Index -> Bay Window Bus All times are Mountain Standard Time/Pacific Daylight Savings Time
Page: Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
Page 6 of 7

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

About | Help! | Advertise | Donate | Premium Membership | Privacy/Terms of Use | Contact Us | Site Map
Copyright © 1996-2018, Everett Barnes. All Rights Reserved.
Not affiliated with or sponsored by Volkswagen of America | Forum powered by phpBB