Hello! Log in or Register   |  Help  |  Donate  |  Buy Shirts  See all banner ads | Advertise on TheSamba.com  
TheSamba.com
 
The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW Mexico
Page: Previous  1, 2
Forum Index -> Bay Window Bus Share: Facebook Twitter
Reply to topic
Print View
Quick sort: Show newest posts on top | Show oldest posts on top View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
SlowLane
Samba Member


Joined: July 11, 2005
Posts: 1036
Location: Livermore, CA
SlowLane is offline 

PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 10:08 am    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW México Reply with quote

jtauxe wrote:
cdennisg wrote:
You could install a valve cover vent kit if you think crank case pressure may be an issue.

You are not the first to suggest this. I'm going to look into it.

If you've not read it yet, I recommend Len Hoffman's treatise on crankcase breathing as part of your research.
_________________
Present:
'81 Westfalia: 2L, manual. Originally Canadian, now Californiated
Back in the day:
'72 Super Beetle
'69 Camper Van - Corvair powered
'71 Window Van - Transferred Corvair from '69

"With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine." - Internet RFC 1925

"They say a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance." - Sir Terry Pratchett
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger Gallery Classifieds Feedback
cdennisg
Samba Member


Joined: November 02, 2004
Posts: 17443
Location: Sandpoint, ID
cdennisg is offline 

PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 10:20 am    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW México Reply with quote

SlowLane wrote:
jtauxe wrote:
cdennisg wrote:
You could install a valve cover vent kit if you think crank case pressure may be an issue.

You are not the first to suggest this. I'm going to look into it.

If you've not read it yet, I recommend Len Hoffman's treatise on crankcase breathing as part of your research.


Interesting read. I wish they had done some testing on a stock, daily driven street car instead of a full race dry sump track car, though. The many differences in the use of the two engine types may show glaring differences in the results.

His findings are definitely on point, and understandable. I like the description of what/how/why crankcase pressure exists and the problems it can cause.
_________________
Escalators can never break down... they can only become stairs... sorry for the convenience

-Mitch Hedberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Gallery Classifieds Feedback
SlowLane
Samba Member


Joined: July 11, 2005
Posts: 1036
Location: Livermore, CA
SlowLane is offline 

PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 11:44 am    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW México Reply with quote

cdennisg wrote:
SlowLane wrote:
jtauxe wrote:
cdennisg wrote:
You could install a valve cover vent kit if you think crank case pressure may be an issue.

You are not the first to suggest this. I'm going to look into it.

If you've not read it yet, I recommend Len Hoffman's treatise on crankcase breathing as part of your research.


Interesting read. I wish they had done some testing on a stock, daily driven street car instead of a full race dry sump track car, though.

Well, they were trying to get at the root of problems they were having with their race engines, so why would they even bother with a streeter? It's not like their primary motivation was myth-busting for the Samba community.
I think the implicit message is that if a fancy-pants ventilation system isn't necessary for a full-blown race engine, it sure as heck isn't necessary for a stock street-driven engine.
_________________
Present:
'81 Westfalia: 2L, manual. Originally Canadian, now Californiated
Back in the day:
'72 Super Beetle
'69 Camper Van - Corvair powered
'71 Window Van - Transferred Corvair from '69

"With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine." - Internet RFC 1925

"They say a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance." - Sir Terry Pratchett
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger Gallery Classifieds Feedback
cdennisg
Samba Member


Joined: November 02, 2004
Posts: 17443
Location: Sandpoint, ID
cdennisg is offline 

PostPosted: Sun Nov 18, 2018 3:45 pm    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW México Reply with quote

SlowLane wrote:
cdennisg wrote:
SlowLane wrote:
jtauxe wrote:
cdennisg wrote:
You could install a valve cover vent kit if you think crank case pressure may be an issue.

You are not the first to suggest this. I'm going to look into it.

If you've not read it yet, I recommend Len Hoffman's treatise on crankcase breathing as part of your research.


Interesting read. I wish they had done some testing on a stock, daily driven street car instead of a full race dry sump track car, though.

Well, they were trying to get at the root of problems they were having with their race engines, so why would they even bother with a streeter? It's not like their primary motivation was myth-busting for the Samba community.
I think the implicit message is that if a fancy-pants ventilation system isn't necessary for a full-blown race engine, it sure as heck isn't necessary for a stock street-driven engine.


Didn't mean to strike a nerve, I was just commenting that testing on their race engine, though important, maybe doesn't directly apply to a stock wet sump system (VW or not) that is not driven at full throttle for hours on end with hard cornering. Maybe it does. Who knows?

No need for a fancy pants vent system. A basic one costs under fifty bucks and does the job just fine. My last one was bought at a swap for ten bucks as I recall. Worked great on my 1776 in a 57 standard bus.
_________________
Escalators can never break down... they can only become stairs... sorry for the convenience

-Mitch Hedberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Gallery Classifieds Feedback
jtauxe
Samba Member


Joined: September 30, 2004
Posts: 5288
Location: Los Alamos, New Mexico
jtauxe is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 7:58 am    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW México Reply with quote

SlowLane wrote:
If you've not read it yet, I recommend Len Hoffman's treatise on crankcase breathing as part of your research.

Hoffman's article seems very much oriented towards his racing engines and "spirited" driving conditions. I don't drive at 6000 RPM.

I still think that the valve cover vents might work, and it is simple enough that I will try it. At this point, I don't have any other ideas, anyway. I'll post results in the other thread about this topic (starting around page 3 or 4 of https://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=552034), since this is a build thread.

Back to the build soon...
_________________
John
"The bus came by and I got on. That's when it all began..." - Garcia/Weir/Kreutzman
http://vw.tauxe.net
1969 Transporter, 1971 Westfalia, 1976, 1977, 1976, 1977, 1971, 1973, 1977 Westfalias,
1979 Champagne Sunroof, 1974 Westfalia Automatic, 1979 Transporter, 1972 Sportsmobile, 1973 Transporter Wild Westerner, 1974 Westfalia parts bus
, 1975 Mexican single cab, 1978 Irish 4-door double cab RHD
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Gallery Classifieds Feedback
jtauxe
Samba Member


Joined: September 30, 2004
Posts: 5288
Location: Los Alamos, New Mexico
jtauxe is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2019 5:36 pm    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW Mexico Reply with quote

In July of 2014 I turned my attention to lighting issues.

Although the truck was fitted with front and rear fog lights from the factory, I wanted to have driving lights up front, and a fog light in the rear. The rear fog light is much brighter than the stock rear taillights, so I intend to run with that most of the time in the dark, for rear end visibility. Here in New Mexico, we don't get a lot of fog, but having extra light at night on the dark roads would definitely be helpful. Hence the switch from fog to driving lights up front.

The original dual position fog light switch (part 111 959 631) was in the dash, but had got rather cooked. I'm guessing that some PO put in a more powerful bulb than was original. I replaced the orange cover with another original one I got somewhere.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


So, the wiring... I made a drawing of the original wiring for the fog light dual position switch and its functionality, and another drawing of how I modified it to operate how I wanted with the driving lights. That is, with the first position to light the rear "fog" light, and the second to light the driving lights up front. With the drawings, it will be easy to return this to its original function if someone desires.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Remains of the original rear fog light wiring were still in the engine compartment, wired into the main harness as a black wire with a purple stripe. But the last bit of what used to go to the lamp seems to show some evidence of a fire. That's interesting. There must have been an engine fire at some point in this truck's past. I added the missing wire to the rear fog light with a quick disconnect so that I could remove the bumper easily, and mounted the light below the left rear bumper, using the factory holes in the left "battery tray" area and in the bumper. The light itself is a still-available Hella light.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


That definitely improves night time visibility!

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The front driving lights, which are also still available from Hella, mounted to existing holes in the bumper. I had to explore through the bondo on the nose to find the original wiring penetrations, but there were there! I cleaned out the 10-mm holes and fitted them with the proper fog light grommets (I'll have to get the part number off those).

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


These will light up the night!

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


There's a lot more discussion about fog lights in this thread:
https://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=351546

I also fixed the original fresh air fans (a.k.a. ambulance fans). One was simply jammed.
_________________
John
"The bus came by and I got on. That's when it all began..." - Garcia/Weir/Kreutzman
http://vw.tauxe.net
1969 Transporter, 1971 Westfalia, 1976, 1977, 1976, 1977, 1971, 1973, 1977 Westfalias,
1979 Champagne Sunroof, 1974 Westfalia Automatic, 1979 Transporter, 1972 Sportsmobile, 1973 Transporter Wild Westerner, 1974 Westfalia parts bus
, 1975 Mexican single cab, 1978 Irish 4-door double cab RHD
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Gallery Classifieds Feedback
jtauxe
Samba Member


Joined: September 30, 2004
Posts: 5288
Location: Los Alamos, New Mexico
jtauxe is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2019 5:37 pm    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW Mexico Reply with quote

From another thread...

Stuartzickefoose wrote:
My favorite repairs are lighting Smile nice work!! Very cool. Can you take a pic of the wiring to the driving lights through the nose? I thought only headlight washers ran wires through the nose...hmmm. Cool fact to learn!


If you liked this one, just wait until you see what lighting I did for the double cab. Interior overhead switches for all four doors, lighted side markers front and rear, plus blinking side lights on the B-pillars! Stay tuned to that thread:
https://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=358956

Here is where the 10-mm holes are located:

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The grommets are special, and when I find the pair I have set aside for the Doka I will post the part number.
_________________
John
"The bus came by and I got on. That's when it all began..." - Garcia/Weir/Kreutzman
http://vw.tauxe.net
1969 Transporter, 1971 Westfalia, 1976, 1977, 1976, 1977, 1971, 1973, 1977 Westfalias,
1979 Champagne Sunroof, 1974 Westfalia Automatic, 1979 Transporter, 1972 Sportsmobile, 1973 Transporter Wild Westerner, 1974 Westfalia parts bus
, 1975 Mexican single cab, 1978 Irish 4-door double cab RHD
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Gallery Classifieds Feedback
asiab3
Air-Schooled


Joined: April 04, 2012
Posts: 10591
Location: wherever you are, USA
asiab3 is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2019 1:15 am    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW Mexico Reply with quote

Huh… Learn something new every day on here still!

Also digging the SI tape measure. Cool
Robbie
_________________
www.facbeook.com/airschooled - Live Volkswagen Q&A - Sunday evenings 6pm Pacific/9pm Eastern.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website Instagram Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Stuartzickefoose
Samba Post Whore


Joined: February 07, 2008
Posts: 10350
Location: SoCal for now...
Stuartzickefoose is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2019 1:25 am    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW Mexico Reply with quote

asiab3 wrote:
Huh… Learn something new every day on here still!

Also digging the SI tape measure. Cool
Robbie


That’s what I said!
_________________
Stuart Zickefoose

2011 Jetta Sportwagen TDi 6 speed manual

206-841-7324
[email protected]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Gallery Classifieds Feedback
jtauxe
Samba Member


Joined: September 30, 2004
Posts: 5288
Location: Los Alamos, New Mexico
jtauxe is offline 

PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 3:10 pm    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW Mexico Reply with quote

jtauxe wrote:
The grommets are special, and when I find the pair I have set aside for the Doka I will post the part number.

About those grommets... They fit in 10-mm holes.
Here is a photo of a pair:
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


And they are available from VW Heritage:
https://www.vwheritage.com/311949149b-grommet-13x5mm-vw-spare
_________________
John
"The bus came by and I got on. That's when it all began..." - Garcia/Weir/Kreutzman
http://vw.tauxe.net
1969 Transporter, 1971 Westfalia, 1976, 1977, 1976, 1977, 1971, 1973, 1977 Westfalias,
1979 Champagne Sunroof, 1974 Westfalia Automatic, 1979 Transporter, 1972 Sportsmobile, 1973 Transporter Wild Westerner, 1974 Westfalia parts bus
, 1975 Mexican single cab, 1978 Irish 4-door double cab RHD
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Gallery Classifieds Feedback
jtauxe
Samba Member


Joined: September 30, 2004
Posts: 5288
Location: Los Alamos, New Mexico
jtauxe is offline 

PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2019 7:42 pm    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW Mexico Reply with quote

Back to it...

Come March of 2016 it was time to revisit the instruments. I started by replacing the metric speedometer with trip odometer with a newer unit from the late '70s, and replaced the black face with the original gray face from the 1975 unit. The odometer read 182842 km, but no one knows how far this truck has traveled anyway, so it's arbitrary.

Next was the instrument cluster housing. This truck had a housing type that I had never seen before, and it was pretty torn up. I happened to spot a much nicer one for sale from Germany, so my guess is that this is a European style of instrument housing.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I like the semiotic symbols for the heater and fresh air controls, especially:

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The idiot light cluster on the left I replaced with better parts, and new face, still in gray. Things are looking much better!

Now for the clock. This is original to the truck, but it does not work. So, now I dived deep into the world of clock repair. After removing the clock mechanism from its housing, which involved a lot of careful prying of the brass ring holding the glass in place, I discovered that part of the nylon gear shaft was sheared off where it was reduced to a pin that went into a hole in the housing. This is not surprising, since it is a nylon gear and a metal housing. I was trying to think of how to fix that pin when I happened to go to my dentist. To get a crown installed.

I like my dentist. She knows that as an engineer I like to see what is going on with all the neat tools and techniques used to keep my teeth in my face as long as I can. She had a cool way of installing a very small screw: You'd screw it into the pilot hole until it was just snug enough that it would twist off, leaving a clean end, embedded in at the right torque, even. Brilliant! And, given the size of the screw, this would be perfect to replace the nylon pin end of the gear. Now I just had to get the pilot hole right. I drilled it with my finger drill as best I could, and the result was satisfactory. (Sometimes that I all can hope for.) I screwed in the miniscrew and pinched it off - a new metal pin!

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


So, I crank up the clock on the test bench again, and it looks to be keeping good time! Whew! But in the morning, it was about 4 hours slow. How odd. I reset it, and looked at it after and hour and it was bang on time. I left it again for some time, and again, it was four hours slow. Well, I'll be damned. How does that happen?

Turns out, the gear that I had fixed the pin on had another problem: It was actually split in one spot, radially. This added a gap of about 1/2 tooth on the gear at the outside end. So, most of the time, everything turned just fine, but whenever the smaller drive gear got to that point on the large one, it got choked up, but would eventually free itself.

I decided that this repair was impossible, without a replacement gear, so I abandoned the effort. Set the clock to 4:20 (duh) and installed it back in the instrument panel. I think it will have to be replaced. Or not. Clocks are cool, but with the amount of time my buses sit with their batteries disconnected, resetting clocks takes time (ha ha) and takes a toll on the clock (ha ha ha).

Here's where I wrote about it in the road log:

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


With that, the instrument panel was restored to full function except the clock.
_________________
John
"The bus came by and I got on. That's when it all began..." - Garcia/Weir/Kreutzman
http://vw.tauxe.net
1969 Transporter, 1971 Westfalia, 1976, 1977, 1976, 1977, 1971, 1973, 1977 Westfalias,
1979 Champagne Sunroof, 1974 Westfalia Automatic, 1979 Transporter, 1972 Sportsmobile, 1973 Transporter Wild Westerner, 1974 Westfalia parts bus
, 1975 Mexican single cab, 1978 Irish 4-door double cab RHD
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Gallery Classifieds Feedback
jtauxe
Samba Member


Joined: September 30, 2004
Posts: 5288
Location: Los Alamos, New Mexico
jtauxe is offline 

PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2019 2:06 pm    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW Mexico Reply with quote

One of the other basic and typically deferred maintenance items is lubrication. I replaced a clogged Zirk fitting and a just plain missing one on the beam, and the squirted a lot of grease in there!

Now back to the back of the truck...

I knew I needed to get back into some engine work, like replacing the flywheel that Sanchez had implicated. (I later found this to be a false diagnosis.)

I removed the engine, cleaned it all up, and replaced the mismatched tin.

Put in the new flywheel, with the nice Saba seal (bought several from GoWesty while I could), and set the endplay to 0.005".

I tested the thermostat with a heat gun and a laser-guided thermometer, and it opened at 60°C, just like it is supposed to!

The PO had the oil pressure switch up on an unsupported stalk, which made me nervous, so I put it back to how it should be.

The distributor got a cleaning and inspection, but it all checked out.

I replaced the alternator with a rebuilt unit. May as well, since the job is infinitely easier with the engine out.

I also refinished the engine compartment, which was definitely needed.

While I was back there, I rebuilt the tail lights, using new housings (lined with reflective aluminum tape) and the old bulb holders, which if you can clean them up are much better than the new ones.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I actually had to repair a lot of the engine compartment wiring, since there had apparently been a fire at some point, and some numbnuts had used some of those destructive pinch barrel connectors for some sort of additional lighting hookup. Man, I hate how those chew up your wires!

While I was in the mode of working on the lights, I rewired the front fog lights (which I will be using as driving lights, so a bit of rerouting of wires was necessary) and the rear fog light. Since these were all part of the factory installation, the original purple/black wires were still in the harness!

And while I have the wiring stuff out, how about a proper wiring for the radio. Ah -- the radio. The M-Codes have a special code (098) that specifies that the radio installed at the factory is a Blaupunkt Ingolstat. After a great deal of searching, I found a working one in Germany and had it shipped over. Unfortunately, it is missing its face plate, so if anyone has a proper face plate, PLEASE let me know! It is currently sporting a chunk of ABS plastic.

So, working, eh? Well, let's just try that out on the bench. I hook it up to a 12 V power supply and an old speaker and fire it up. First station I find is public radio, and... get this: The radio starts belting out Richard Strauss' Ride of the Valkyrie! I kid you not. Not only is this a real German radio, it is playing, for the first time for my listening pleasure, perhaps the most definitive German music. And it is victory music. That was a very special moment. This goes in for sure!

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


and, in the dash, awaiting a correct faceplate...

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

_________________
John
"The bus came by and I got on. That's when it all began..." - Garcia/Weir/Kreutzman
http://vw.tauxe.net
1969 Transporter, 1971 Westfalia, 1976, 1977, 1976, 1977, 1971, 1973, 1977 Westfalias,
1979 Champagne Sunroof, 1974 Westfalia Automatic, 1979 Transporter, 1972 Sportsmobile, 1973 Transporter Wild Westerner, 1974 Westfalia parts bus
, 1975 Mexican single cab, 1978 Irish 4-door double cab RHD
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Gallery Classifieds Feedback
jtauxe
Samba Member


Joined: September 30, 2004
Posts: 5288
Location: Los Alamos, New Mexico
jtauxe is offline 

PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2019 3:08 pm    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW Mexico Reply with quote

Major maintenance, continued...

Let's take a look at that fuel tank. Fortunately, these are relatively easy to remove in a pickup, compared to a kombi. You just take off the fire wall panels to the front and scoot out the tank. I cleaned the tank and discovered what I hoped I would not: pinholes. In my view, if you can see pinholes on the outside of the tank, it is time to scrap it.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


It doesn't look all that great inside, either:

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


And any repair -- well, if it fails, the results could be catastrophic, so it's just not worth it.

Here is the original tank in its habitat:

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


And, it so happens that I have a very nice spare tank that I retrieved from a 1977 FI bus, so I'll use that, sealing off the fuel return port. That way, if anyone might like to convert this truck to FI, the tank is already done. The only downside is that it is not the original style. So the FI tank got a nice paint job.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


But before it can go back in...

...oh, my that fuel tank compartment under the bed is in need of some TLC.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


This is one of the most miserable frickin' jobs I have ever done on a vehicle. Good thing I am not claustrophobic! You've just got to squeeze yourself in there, but decide beforehand if you want to go in face up or face down. Both are needed to get the entire confined space cleaned (I used the POR-15 Marine Clean), hit it with Ospho, treated with POR-15, and painted. It was many many hours in a cramped space with not enough room to turn over, and using nasty chemicals. I suited up in my best PPE including an organic vapor mask and went to town. Came out much nicer!

I started with some POR-15 as a base:

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


And finished with brushed-on automotive paint from Sherwin-Williams automotive division. They should now have a color map for L245 Light Gray.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Then I strapped in and hooked up the new fuel tank. Looks lovely!

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Don't forget to wire up the fuel gauge sender.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Button up those fire wall panels with some 3-M "Strip-Calk" and I can think about that nice space that I will not be in again.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The PO got a bit carried away with the painting, and painted the gas cap. Razz

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


It cleaned up nicely, with a lot of hand work.
_________________
John
"The bus came by and I got on. That's when it all began..." - Garcia/Weir/Kreutzman
http://vw.tauxe.net
1969 Transporter, 1971 Westfalia, 1976, 1977, 1976, 1977, 1971, 1973, 1977 Westfalias,
1979 Champagne Sunroof, 1974 Westfalia Automatic, 1979 Transporter, 1972 Sportsmobile, 1973 Transporter Wild Westerner, 1974 Westfalia parts bus
, 1975 Mexican single cab, 1978 Irish 4-door double cab RHD
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Gallery Classifieds Feedback
heimlich Premium Member
VWNOS.com


Joined: November 20, 2016
Posts: 4188
Location: Houston, Texas
heimlich is online now 

PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2019 3:17 pm    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW Mexico Reply with quote

That's a nice looking truck. Let me know if you want to return that truck to Texas.
_________________
www.vwnos.com
New NOS OEM Parts. Classic Brands. Classic Quality
5% Off your order with coupon code: 5%OFF
Aluminum and Cast Iron Restored Distributors Available (<--Click here)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Gallery Classifieds Feedback
jtauxe
Samba Member


Joined: September 30, 2004
Posts: 5288
Location: Los Alamos, New Mexico
jtauxe is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2019 7:12 pm    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW Mexico Reply with quote

I had a vacuum leak, and I traced it down to the brake booster, so I pulled it out to send off to Brakes Materials and Parts
https://brakematerialsandparts.webs.com
in Indiana for a rebuild I have used them before and their work always is good.

And as long as I have the booster out, I may as well clean up the area around it, including the crusty bits around the brake fluid reservoir in the cab, right? Well, get some popcorn for this one...

Rather than write it all up here again, I will just refer to the thread that I already wrote on this topic:
https://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=658661

And that's how a vacuum leak caused me to remove the rear window!
_________________
John
"The bus came by and I got on. That's when it all began..." - Garcia/Weir/Kreutzman
http://vw.tauxe.net
1969 Transporter, 1971 Westfalia, 1976, 1977, 1976, 1977, 1971, 1973, 1977 Westfalias,
1979 Champagne Sunroof, 1974 Westfalia Automatic, 1979 Transporter, 1972 Sportsmobile, 1973 Transporter Wild Westerner, 1974 Westfalia parts bus
, 1975 Mexican single cab, 1978 Irish 4-door double cab RHD
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Gallery Classifieds Feedback
asiab3
Air-Schooled


Joined: April 04, 2012
Posts: 10591
Location: wherever you are, USA
asiab3 is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2019 11:23 pm    Post subject: Re: The 1975 Single Cab that VW Germany built for VW Mexico Reply with quote

Ha! Yee! Just how a compression test leads to a brand new engine...

I enjoyed that story when it was written, thanks for putting it in context!
I’ve only laid under the rear seat of a double cab.... those can get cramped too, but nothing like the horrors of single cab gas tanks that Brian had told me about..

BMaP always does stellar work. A client used BusDepot’s new brake booster and found it WAY too sensitive, so he had the original rebuilt by them and the brakes are sublime.

Robbie
_________________
www.facbeook.com/airschooled - Live Volkswagen Q&A - Sunday evenings 6pm Pacific/9pm Eastern.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website Instagram Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic    Forum Index -> Bay Window Bus All times are Mountain Standard Time/Pacific Daylight Savings Time
Page: Previous  1, 2
Page 2 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

About | Help! | Advertise | Donate | Premium Membership | Privacy/Terms of Use | Contact Us | Site Map
Copyright © 1996-2020, Everett Barnes. All Rights Reserved.
Not affiliated with or sponsored by Volkswagen of America | Forum powered by phpBB