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1986 2.1 L 2WD Vanagon GL Head Gasket Project
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90Doka_Guy
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2008 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that thing in the first picture is an engine block heater. Could be wrong though, i just remember a discussion about it that came up a couple months ago.
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id
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Back at the engine this afternoon. This is basically the moment of truth on this project. Just how pitted are those heads? Well Samba friends lets have a look shall we?

View of the valves with the valve cover removed. The clip on the valve cover slipped off easy, but the covers are a bit rusty... I am pointing at one of the bolts that holds the rocker arm assembly in place.
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View with the rocker are assemble out and all 8 nuts that hold the head in place removed. I am pointing at one of the nut locations. The nuts came of easy with a regular breaker bar...
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View of a push rod tube. I am pointing at the end that is a bit flared and goes towards the engine block. I kept the gasket at each end of the tubes with each tube. I suppose I'll have to replace them.
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I didn't take any pictures of the push rods themselves but they were all straight from what I could see. I labeled each rod to put them back where they came from. They look the same at both ends. Does it matter which end goes where?

I also didn't have any good shots of the valve guide that wanted to come out with the head. I used a flat head screwdriver to carefully pry the guide back into the block. It was a bit fiddly but not too hard.

View of the head. There was a light coating of some kind of gunk between the head and the gasket. I could use my finger nail to scrape off most of the gunk. They are pitted a little bit. So what do I do? Put my own gunk on? Get them machined and a valve job done on the heads? Get new heads? Also the valves looked pretty black. Is this a concern?
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View of a push rod tube still connected to the block. Again just noting that the flared end is towards the block.
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So I guess I'll take the heads to a local shop and they will likely tell me to get new heads.javascript:emoticon('Confused')

Anything else I should look at while I've got this engine torn out? I take it I should replace the gasket on the outside of the valve guide where it sits in the head. Anything to look at on the clutch?
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iltis74
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 11:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No reason not to crack the case now, but if you aren't going to you could at least pull the rods and check those bearings. Better yet just replace them. This is also the time to check out the oil pump and cover. A new throw out bearing is never a bad idea either. And on and on and on.
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id
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PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2008 7:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I ordered new heads from Boston Bob and they arrived in Canada today. So I am back at the project. (Wife is tired of the van on blocks in the driveway so the project has momentum)

Anyway I pulled the coolant line from the right rear to access the circlip on Cylinder #2 and fiddled for bit with a needle nose to try and pull the circlip. I was unsuccessful. Then I thought, "Why don't I just swap the black O-ring at the base of the cylinder without removing the cylinder?"

Any reason not to do it this way and leave the piston and cylinder in the block?

Also I have a blue box full of gaskets and O-rings to do the heads. Anyone out there have a list of everything that comes in the package?

Pictures of tonight's work follow in case anyone else treads down this path...

View of the alternator mount assembly prior to removal
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View with the assembly removed
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View of the right rear coolant line to the block prior to removal
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View with the coolant hose removed
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View of the circlip with Piston #2 all the way out.
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View of the black O-ring at the base of Cylinder #2. Any reason not to just slide the old one out and install the new one?
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id
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PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2008 7:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As reported elsewhere, I did slide a cylinder out too far when attempting the "slide on the new black o-ring trick". This caused me to break the oil ring when sliding the cylinder back into place. (So I am replacing the rods, rod bearings, and rings as a result)

I thought I'd post how far you can slide the cylinders here for continuity with this project.

View of a cylinder with its new green o-ring. The cylinder end is lined up with the end of the bottom head stud. This is as far as you can go without sliding the cylinder past the piston rings.
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View comparing the new green o-ring to the old one
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View of how far out the cylinder can be pulled out without sliding it past the piston rings. Again see that the end of the cylinder is lined up with the bottom head stud. Note that the piston has to be at TDC.
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id
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PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2008 7:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

While I was waiting for the rods etc. to be delivered to Canada from the VC, I thought I'd repack the two lifters I noticed were soft (could be depressed using my thumb). Following the Bentley procedure I pulled the soft lifters (one at a time so as to put them back in their original locations). Then I repacked them with new oil.

View of the lifter
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View of the lifter dissassembled
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Pointing at the two locations that had soft lifters.
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PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2008 8:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pulling the water pump seemed to be the logical thing to do next. In order to get it off I first had to pull the water pump pulley. Then I could access the connections for the crossover pipe. With the crossover out I could then unbolt the water pump.

View of the water pump pulley prior to pulling. I held onto one of the bolts with a breaker bar to allow enough purchase to spin the other bolts off. For the last bolt I think I wedged a screwdriver through one of the holes to hold it in place.
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View of the surface where the pump connects to the block. The surface looks pretty clean.
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View of the pump volute where it connects to the block. Notice the red sealant that has been used to seat the o-ring.
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View of the pump body. Should I be worried about the rusty snail trail on the side of the pump body?
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tencentlife
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PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2008 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

New pumps typically bleed a bit there as the shaft packing takes up moisture and expands. Then it stops, so long as there is moisture in the system and it sees regular use. Whether that much staining is worrisome or not is hard to say. Rust staining from the initial bleed would remain, and its severity would depend a lot on climate and the coolant you're using. Drainage there on a water pump long in regular service is a sure sign of bearing play and says it's nearing failure. But just looking at the staining without history, I couldn't say. In that case, I would just go on mileage. If the pump had, say, 50k or more on it, I would go for a new one as long as I was that far into it. The worst thing about dealing with the cooling system is draining all the runny stuff out.
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Joe VW
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PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2008 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While you are this far into this project I would definetly put new/rebuilt rods and rod bearings in. I would hate to see you put all this time and money into it and have the rod bolts fail. You should read the info on 2.1 rods and stretch bolts at Boston Bobs website.
The case does not need to be split to do this.
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PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

He's already on board with that.
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id
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PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Joe. Got the reconditioned rods from VC. More pics to follow:)
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PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Joe VW wrote:
While you are this far into this project I would definetly put new/rebuilt rods and rod bearings in. I would hate to see you put all this time and money into it and have the rod bolts fail. You should read the info on 2.1 rods and stretch bolts at Boston Bobs website.
The case does not need to be split to do this.


How do you change the rods without splitting the case? Just work through the sides of the case?
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PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 8:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yup, you can work right thru the cylinder spigots.

In fact, when I'm tearing an engine down, I avoid the difficult task of getting the wrist pin clips and pins out thru the access holes by just removing the rod nuts by reaching in thru the spigot with a long wobble extension. Then it's easy to remove the pistons from the rods out on the bench. You want to have a strong magnet picker-upper tool to reach in and retrieve parts you drop inside, which you will undoubtedly do. Keep count of all the rod nuts, make sure you have eight when you're done.

I would not recommend doing it this way with an engine in the car, only on the bench or an engine stand.
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PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 10:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

10cent is right. The extension/wobble combo is the easy way to pull the rods (pull the cylinder first)

I filed a set of needlenose just perfect to be able to hold onto the circlips, so I've got that going for me for the reinstallation.

Any suggestions for how to slip the cylinders past the rings? I am using the hose clamp technique, but the clamp isn't quite wide enough and it's a lot of trial and error. I was thinking of jury rigging a set of vise grip needle nose and some pop can aluminum to build a ring compression tool. (1 on, 3 to go)
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PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2008 8:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Drink can aluminum isn't much thicker than paper. Interesting to see if you can make that work. But all the FLAPS sell a nice wide band universal ring compressor, about $15. You should have this in your arsenal. There's lots of ways to rig something if you have some metal stock around, but for the time spent I would just go buy the tool.
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PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2008 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

10cent

Do you

1. Slip the pistons in the cylinders and then put the wrist pins in

or

2. Install the wrist pins into the pistons and then slip the cylinders by

I borrowed a ring compression tool, but I can only use it to slip the piston into the cylinder on the bench (too big to wriggle into the case). I am worried about damaging the cylinder if I bang the wrist pin in with the cylinder in place.
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PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2008 11:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you are having to "bang" in the wrist pins, something is not right. I believe the pins should be a slip fit in the piston and the rod. The circlips will retain the pins. Over time, the circlip area of the piston does get hammered. That is why the pins need to be whacked out. Old school used to have you heat the pistons in an oil bath to aid in asssembly.
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PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2008 3:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You put the pistons into cyls on the bench first.

Prelube the pin bores with some light oil, and smear the pin with same. Test-fit the pins to be sure they go in slowly but smoothly with steady hand pressure. Also always test-fit pins into the rods. The fit into rods and pistons both is by firm hand pressure. If you have to drive them, they're too tight. If they slip in quick and easy, or have an perceptible play, then they're too loose.

Put the forward-facing clip into each piston. Observe the arrows on the piston tops; they point forward toward the flywheel.

Before assembly, you should run the head nuts on a piece of sandpaper on a flat surface first until the bases are clean and smooth. Also, a tap should be run into each nut, and a die over each head stud, to be sure the threads are all clean so the torquing is smooth and accurate.

Then, to install the piston/cyl assemblies, rotate the crank to bring each crank throw to TDC, starting with the one nearer the flywheel on a side (#1 & 3). Then hold the cyl with piston in position while lifting the rod up to align the small end with the pin bore. Slip the pin in, push it until it clears the rearward clip groove. Then snap the clip into place. Always rotate every clip in its groove some to be sure it's completely in the groove. I stuff rags into the open case spigots in case a clip pops out of control to lessen the chance of it flying into the case.

Then slide that cyl down over its piston, and rotate the crank 180 to do the rear ones (#2 & 4) the same way. On the rears you have to work thru the water jacket access holes to put the pins and the last clips in. The positioning here will try your patience.

As an aid to keeping things together, I cut some short pieces of 1/2" PVC pipe as plastic spacers, to hold any installed cyls down so they don't rise when I rotate the crank. Short ones for the upper studs, a bit longer for lowers. A washer and head nut go over the pipe stubs to hold things down. Just two opposing studs is sufficient to hold each cyl in place. This is a nice trick for holding engines together when you only intend to reseal the heads, for instance. But whenever the heads are off, I do think it's worthwhile to always replace the cyl base o-rings.

When you're ready to put on the channel seal, first run a thin continuous bead of the sealant on the end face of the case water jacket. Then put on the channel seal, push it gently into place all around, and run the second bead on the flat seal face just like it shows in the book.

The combustion sealing rings can be coated with grease all around, which will make them stick to the inside of the head openings so they don't fall out when putting the head on.

There's a lot to juggle when putting the heads on. The head has to be started on the studs, but the pushrod tubes need to be slipped in between before it can go all the way down. So leave the head out way from the case far enough that the tubes will clear, and hold each tube in place while slipping a pushrod thru it and into the case to hang them there temporarily. Once all 4 are hanging, you can slide the head on further while you settle each tube into its openings. Rotate each tube so it settles into its openings. Then take the pushrods back out.

It can be tough to align the heads over the cyl tops at the same time you need to get a couple of the nuts started so you can draw it down. To make that easier, I'm lifting the cyls up a half-inch or so, not enough that the lower skirt comes out of the case, but enough that I can align them in the head as I slide it on. Then as the head is pushed all the way down, the cyls will realign into the case spigots. If you're using any sealant on the cyl base o-rings, you would want to keep the cyls from seating all the way down onto the case if you're going to do this method. Otherwise, the sealant will be disrupted when the cyls are lifted back out a bit. If you just oil the o-rings, then lifting them up again isn't a problem.

Once you get it all lined up, get one or two nuts started top and bottom, use the to bring the head down a little more until more nuts can be started. I put on four out at the corners, and tightening them alternately bit by bit the head is drawn all the way down into place. Only then do I put the yellow sealer on the remaining 4 nuts, spin them down, then take off the first four and put sealer on them too.

I stop at about 15 ft. lb. on the first side, then get the opposite head on, tighten it to 15, then I alternate sides going up about 10 ft.lb. each time until I reach the specified torque, 37 ft.lb. You need to work pretty fast on the second head to do it this way. After both sides are taken to full torque, I do a final second check both sides. Torquing alternately balances strain on the case. It's an old H-4 rebuilder's trick.
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id
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PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2008 8:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For continuity sake (In case any other virgin mechanics read this thread looking for ideas etc...) Here are some shots of the rod installation, ring installation, and piston/cylinder install.

Here's the rod/piston that I took out. Pretty grimy.
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Shot of the end of one of the pistons after I cleaned it with varsol
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I plastigaged the first three rod bearings. They all looked straight and under .001". By the time I got fiddling with the fourth rod, I only wanted to put it in once.
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Shot of the reconditioned VC rod with my notes on side tolerance on the paper behind. The side tolerances were within the spec for all for rods.
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Shot of the first piston in place with the rings hanging. Generally I found it easier to get the wrist pins installed with the cylinder out. Especially for the second cylinder of each side. I used a hose clamp to compress the rings and then slid the cylinder on. The tough thing is that the oil rings I got had a front and a back ring with a coil-like ring in between. The hose clamp isn't quite wide enough to compress the back oil ring. For the first two cylinders this meant a couple of slow, painful iterations.
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Shot with the first cylinder in place and the second piston ready to receive the second cylinder.
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Shot of the back of a piston with the wrist pin installed and slid forward. With the wrist pin slid like this I could "hook" the rod, and then slide/tap the wrist pin into place. Also after reading the advice on wrist pins, I would spray liquid wrench on the wrist pin and then slide it back and forth a couple of times till it would move using firm hand pressure.
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Shot of the third piston/cylinder ready for a wrist pin. This was the only one that I did the "easy way". I compressed the ring with the ring compression tool I borrowed. Then I slid the cylinder down onto the piston. I was able to line up the piston and rod and slide the wrist pin into place.
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Shot of the fourth piston cylinder with the ring hanging out. I tried to do it the easy way, but I couldn't get the wrist pin into the rod. So I pulled the cylinder, then got the wrist pin in, then slid the cylinder on. This time I got "smart" (finally). I cut the side of a tuna can and used it under my hose clamp. This allowed me to compress all the rings at once. Then I was able to slide the cylinder on in one swell foop.
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With all the cylinders in place I was a very happy man. This was one of the trickiest things I have ever attempted Laughing
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PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2008 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I took a copy of tencent's how to install heads post, John Muir's Volkswagen book, and the relevant sections of the Bentley and headed out to the shed to install the heads. Sage (my 6 year old) took some live action photos.

Shot of the compression ring installed into the head. With a little grease.
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Shot of the head nut with the sealant spread like yellow icing.
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Shot of the gasket sealant being applied to the case
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Shot of the gasket in place
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Shot of the sealant going on the gasket
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Shot of the head being snugged into place. It went on very smooth. I put the corner bolts on just enough to get it into place and then installed the inner nuts with the yellow goo. Basically followed tencent's story line above. The trick with the push rods holding the tubes in place was really slick:)
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The head is in place
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A side view of the head. I just love how clean everything looks:)
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Rods in place in their tubes. I found that with a head lamp I could see right down each tube to the lifters to check that each rod was seated properly
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Rocker arm assembly in place.
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Now that I am starting to put the engine back together, I have a question. On what connections would you use loctite, and on what connections would you use never seize, and on what connections should you use nothing?
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