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Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics)
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dobryan
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 9:01 pm    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

You are making me feel good. It took me three hours without removing the dash and I was miserable the whole time. Laughing
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0to60in6min
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 10:22 pm    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

hey... in the vanagon tinkerer circle, I think there are...

1. Master
2. Excellent
3. Very good
4. Good
5. So so
6. not there yet or newbie

you're in the #3.... or maybe #2..

I am in #5

Very Happy
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squarevan
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 3:08 pm    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

Don't know if this is posted already but it might be easier don't have to take the dash off and go upside down. Note in this video there is not a clutch pedal but it makes it a lot easier to remove the clutch pedal but being able to see the clip and pull out the pin. As others have mention hand size and body type might not work with the orginal post.

you can search on youtube for:

How to replace the Dual Diaphragm Brake Booster Volkswagen T3

https://www.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DzuhLBdvFK-8&...bs.1,d.amc

good luck
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squarevan
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 3:11 pm    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

Sorry I don't think the shortcut works so just search Crying or Very sad
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bajaleo Premium Member
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 8:35 pm    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

Damn, he made that look easy. The replacement booster looked to be bigger than the original.

Any guesses as to why he kept the booster wrapped up in some kind of fabric while he was installing it?
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 8:30 am    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

squarevan wrote:
Don't know if this is posted already but it might be easier don't have to take the dash off and go upside down. Note in this video there is not a clutch pedal but it makes it a lot easier to remove the clutch pedal but being able to see the clip and pull out the pin. As others have mention hand size and body type might not work with the orginal post.

you can search on youtube for:

How to replace the Dual Diaphragm Brake Booster Volkswagen T3

https://www.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DzuhLBdvFK-8&...bs.1,d.amc

good luck


Squarevan, is this you in the video?
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pomfritz
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 12:49 pm    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

I just did this as I have the dash out for other stuff. Van has 215K on it and I have no idea of prior history so I figured it had some wear, though pedal did not drop or have excessive play like others.

I ordered the GW repair kit with a bushing, clevis pin and cotter pin.

Taking out the pedal was about 1 hr and most of that was knocking out the thick pin. It needs to come out a lot further than you think, I had to twist the brake/clucth pedal assembly a little so that the pin could be pushed out farther and clear the frame below the dash.

After removal, I saw that the pedal and pin had very little wear. It didn't look like this was a replacement at some point, due to heavy gunk and dirt alll over it.

So I had the kit and had to decide if I would install it or not. If a machine shop was open in my area on the weekend I would've taken it there but as there weren't I decided to do the drilling myself. I also considered how ai would feel in 5 or so years if I had to re-remove everything again to fix the clutch. Now was the time to do it.

I had a bench top drill press and bought a 7/16" carbide bit. No need for any welding, just drill the existing hole bigger.

I had to figure out a way to brace the pedal and drill the hole at 90 deg.

I came up with this little jig from using a 5/8" bolt, washers and nuts and scrap wood.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


It worked, sort of, the top half the hole was a little wider than is should've been and I'm not is this is attributable to the quality of the drill press or my novice skills with metal work. The bottom half was fine.

The bearing did need a a little press fit but there was a small gap on the side the hole was a little bigger. I turned to my old friend JB and mixed up a little of it and smeared it around the bushing. I think it will hold just fine.

Oh, also took the advice to cut off the metal tail opposite the bushing flange to make maneuvering back in place easier, glad I did it.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Getting it back in was okay, Used a brass drift and mallet to get the large pin in, The tricky part was holding the pedal assembly in such a way that the pin lined up and could be tapped through the last hole.

Getting the circlip on was a snap with the dash out.

My hats off to those who did this with the dash in, I'm not that big and I could not control myself to see what was happening up under there and no way I would've wanted to tap that pin in and out in that space. Maybe if it slid in and out easier, but that was not the case with mine.
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Steve M.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 4:10 pm    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

Just going to ad my two cents worth of info on repairing this.

I was in a hurry and wanted to get this done in one day instead of waiting for a repaired pedal to come in from a vendor at a shocking price.
I chose to do a little mod on the assembly seeing how the clevis pin was wearing in the center. I also thought I could get it done without having to do a weld repair on the elongated holes. Not the case however!
I added a 5/16" guide bushing to both the Clevis and the Clutch Pedal to distribute the wear hopefully more evenly. I was hoping I could be able to get a press-fit to hold them in place, but I had to go to a welder to have them secured properly.

The holes in the pedal and Clevis were not that badly worn so I thought there was enough material to put some bushings in place to work.
Unfortunately I had to reduce the size of the clevis pin down to 1/4" diameter. However, I think with the bushings filling the space so there is no free play for side to side movement it should be okay.

So to start:

That hard to get to shaft and circlip.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The circlip depending on it's rotation you can maybe get off using a 90° pick or you can rotate it around to where you can push on it with a common screwdriver.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I used two 5/16" guide bushings to distribute the wear more evenly. I'll know if it worked in 25 years! 1/2" length for the pedal and 3/4" for the clevis.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The guide bushing in the Clevis showing the elongation of the clevis pin hole. It only wears on one side so the other hole is a press fit to keep it straight.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The guide bushing in the clutch pedal. The indentations helped hold it in place as I wasn't quite straight in drilling the hole out to 5/16". they squeezed it enough to hold it.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The clevis guide bushing tack welded into place.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


To weld it easier it is best to leave it uncut.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The bushing in the clutch pedal.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Cutting out the center of the Clevis bushing using a cutting disc.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The bushing in the pedal I had it placed so that I did not have to trim both sides. Leaving .074" on each side centers it in the Clevis. So I only had to trim one side.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Looks uneven, but wasn't finished trimming it to fit, but you get the idea!
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The only clevis pins i could find were a universal size...not good enough for me since the diameter was reduced down to 1/4" to fit the guide bushings.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


So I used a 1/4-20 bolt with a long solid shank. I cut off the long end after it was installed on the pedal.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Assembly ready to go.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Okay some things you could try in getting that circlip back onto the shaft.

Some of the old dried grease from the seat tracks will help hold it on the frame so it doesn't fall off while reaching for a screwdriver to push it into place!
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Marking the center of the circlip helps you locate it so when you do push on it you know where to push. Here a black Sharpie maker worked.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


My hands are just too big to fit up there so I even tried a Neodium magnet to get it into place...it worked!
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

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Steve M.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 4:14 pm    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

Btw, somebody mentioned adjusting the pedal play.

The original factory play per Bentley was set to .005" between the end of the pushrod and the clutch master cylinder.

If you do not loosen the threaded pushrod and your really, really exact in repairing the holes in the pedal and clevis yI do not think you need to readjust it.
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bobbyblack Premium Member
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 9:12 am    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

I really appreciate the photos and documentation addition, Steve M., thanks!!
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Steve M.
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 11:14 am    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

bobbyblack wrote:
I really appreciate the photos and documentation addition, Steve M., thanks!!


No problem! Good luck!
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 11:39 am    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

Steve M. wrote:
...The original factory play per Bentley was set to .005" between the end of the pushrod and the clutch master cylinder...


My Bentley says 0.5mm or .020" for a maximum play - couldn't find any other reference though for that spec I would tend to go with the maximum just because of the consequences of it being too tight.
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 12:30 pm    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

Ahwahnee wrote:
Steve M. wrote:
...The original factory play per Bentley was set to .005" between the end of the pushrod and the clutch master cylinder...


My Bentley says 0.5mm or .020" for a maximum play - couldn't find any other reference though for that spec I would tend to go with the maximum just because of the consequences of it being too tight.


Ah - Good that you caught that and corrected me. My mistake.
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 12:40 pm    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

Thanks to everyone who contributed on this topic!

I have my dash off for heater core replacement, happened to read something about clutch pedal wear and decided to check it out. (I had a lot of free-play)

Even with the dash out it looked about impossible to get the pedal out and Bentley is no help. I was considering removing the booster can for access and decided to check Samba first - glad I did!

The circlip was easy from the top with 2 screwdrivers, the pin was pretty stuck but a ladyfoot under the pin got it over enough. My pedal's hole is oblong but still smaller than the 7/16" required for GW's bushing so I think I'll just drill it out without the welding build-up. It will change the geometry very slightly but I think it will be ok. I might lengthen the push rod just a smidge...

My clevis pin was heavily worn, about halfway through.
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 13, 2018 10:34 am    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

I'm wondering if this is acceptable clutch play. I'm also wondering if the squeaking that you hear towards the end of the video is a worn clevis pin or something else.

I'm able to see the clevis pin on the outside, but not the passenger side of the clutch pedal. I have no idea how in the world you guys are reaching this. I'm on my back, clutch engaged, with mirrors flashlights, and I do yoga.

Before I go nuts, I want to make sure I'm attacking the right problem, if any.

Thanks.


Link

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 7:37 pm    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

I just replaced the pedal on my 91 Weekender.
It has over 260,000 miles.

Took me about 3-4 hrs and I'm no pro.

Clutch play was about 1" . Clutch pedal was making some squeaking sounds and felt a very subtle grinding feel when I pressed it.
My mechanic said it would need to be replaced within a year - he'd have to remove the dash. It would cost about $1000.

I found this article about changing it without removing the dash and thought I'd try it. Thank you iceracer for the original post on how to do this!

Attempt 1 - chickened out
Initially I prepared, removed the drivers seat and got under there with a headlamp. Successfully removed the large spring from the clutch pedal, then looked for the C-clip. It was so high up there and space was so tight, I just couldn't imagine I'd be able to do this job successfully. I couldn't even see or feel the pushrod - just super-tight quarters in there. I gave up, put the spring back on and decided to just have my mechanic do it.

Then I thought about it a couple days.

Gave myself a few words of encouragement. I can do this. I will do this.
This time I prepared a bit more:

Attempt 2: Success!
1. layed out some cardboard and a soft yoga mat over where the driver's seat was.

2. Got a bunch more lamps - 2 headlamps, a magnet lamp and a bike lamp.

3. Dumped a bunch of tools in the passenger floor so I wouldn't need to get out of the van to get anything.

4. put on my favorite Spotify playlist.

5. removed the clutch pedal pad.

6. folded back some of the carpet

7. Removed the plastic housing attached to the underside of the steering column using 2 screws.

6. Pulled off the spring again using a screwdriver and leverage.

7. Aimed all my lights in the area - placed one strategically up in there to shine on the C-clip.

9. I pressed the clutch pedal down and wedged a small block of wood between the pedal arm and the clutch master cylinder. (I Made sure this was very secure cause if it popped loose the clutch pedal would hit me in the head hard. )

10. Removing the C-clip. Mine was turned with the open side away from me so first I needed to spin it 180º. There was no easy way to do this so I got my sharpest small flat screwdriver and caught the side of the C-clip with the corner of the blade. I could get it to move slightly and continued this till the open side was facing toward me. I heard one story about someone losing the clip when it popped off so I tried to attach some duct tape to the top of the clip. I used two large, long flathead screwdrivers to press both ends of the C-clip. It tried to spin which was challenging but eventually I was able to push equally on both sides and pop that thing off. It flew, but landed on the floor.

11. Sliding the shaft. I removed the wood block to release the clutch pedal. Reached up with a large screwdriver and wedged against something to press the end of the pin toward the passenger side. It slid pretty smoothly till the pin wasn't visible from the clutch side. Then I needed to pull from the brake side of the assembly. I reach up and got two hands up there and was able to get one finger from each hand to pull the shaft using the pin on the end of the shaft as something to keep my fingers from slipping off the end of the shaft. I slid it until the clutch pedal was loose. I didn't have any problem with it bottoming out as some have reported.

12. Removing the pedal/ pushrod. I located the mounting bolts for the clutch master cylinder. I completely removed these. This allowed more room to pull the pushrod out of the rubber boot on the clutch master cylinder. Then I could carefully find a path for the clutch pedal and pushrod to come out together.

The pin and pedal showed wear but not nearly as much as I expected.

13. Prepping new pedal. I took my new pedal (from GoWesty) and re-used the pushrod/ clevis but used the new pin and split-pin from GW. I applied white lithium grease to all the moving parts and to the holes in the clutch arm for the large shaft. (I'm not sure if this is the right type of grease but it's what I had)

14. Replacing pedal. I positioned the clutch back in place the same way I took it out. Had to hold the clutch high up in there to get the pushrod to get into the rubber boot and into the clutch master cylinder. Aligned the hole in clutch pedal with the shaft, then pushed the shaft from the brake pedal side. With a little jiggling of the clutch pedal, the shaft slid through the bushings in the clutch pedal. I had to adjust the angle again to get the shaft to go through the hole in the pedal assembly, then it slid all the way till it stopped.

15. Re-attaching the master cylinder. I bolted the master cylinder back on using the two bolts. (a bit tricky to access these bolts now)

16. Replacing C-clip. I pushed the clutch pedal down and wedged the piece of wood back in between the pedal arm and the clutch master cylinder. This is the key to accessing the short exposed end of the shaft where the C-clip goes. I hot-glued the C-clip to the end of a long flat screwdriver. Made sure the lights were aimed right. Pushed it on - the hot glue came off and screwdriver slipped - C-clip was not clicked on yet so I gave it another tap with the screwdriver edge and it snapped on. Yes!

17. Replacing spring. I removed the wood block again, freeing the clutch pedal. I replaced the spring using pliers rather than a screwdriver this time.

18. Replace carpet, seat, cleanup.

19. Beer

Notes:
I did all this with my Westy parked on the street. I never opened the driver's door once during the procedure. (except to remove the driver's seat). I never removed the shifter. I never removed the steering wheel.

After having the clutch pedal pushed in for a long period of time (1/2 hr?), I noticed some fluid had dripped from the clutch master cylinder. I cleaned it off after the clutch was free and it didn't leak anymore - After driving the car, I checked and still not leaking. Is this normal?

My clutch feels really smooth now. There is still more play than I expected (1/4 to 1/2") but there is a big difference in the feel of the pedal and the clutch engages much higher off the floor than previously.

Thanks to iceracer - you saved me some dough. I can't imagine being the first person to try this - just so intimidating initially how tight it is but it is doable. Thanks also to everyone who posted about their experiences. Before I did this job, I organized all the info I found on The Samba loosely into steps below.

This info is collected from lots of posts on TheSamba. Each step has quotes from multiple people who posted about their efforts:

Organized notes from TheSamba:

PREP
• Helps if you stretch before crawling in there
• remove the seats
• removed the carpet & pedal pad
• get a good pad to cushion yourself.
• set a small LED hiking headlamp just behind the steering column pointing upward
• lay on your side/back and put my face right up to the pedals to see up there. It is not easy or fun but you can do it.

REMOVING CLUTCH MASTER CYLINDER
• Taking off the clutch master cylinder was very helpful. It made inserting the rod back down inside the rubber boot a snap.
• I carefully removed my clutch master cylinder from the mount. That allowed me to apply easy energy to remove the clevis pushrod. Having it detached made more room to access anything I needed.
• IMHO, unbolting the clutch master is the key to creating enough room to make this job possible.

REMOVING SPRING:
• The trick in removing and installing is to hold the pedal down to the floor to get the spring and C clip off and on.
•Use a needle nose pliers and remove the clutch pedal spring.

REMOVING CLIP:
• with two screwdrivers remove the clip
• The trick in removing and installing is to hold the pedal down to the floor to get the spring and C clip off and on.
• Once I got the clip to spin around to where I could get a couple flat head screw drivers on the end it popped right off. The rest took about 2 minutes to get the pedal out.
• Pop the little clip which holds the pin (last pic) I just used a long flat screwdriver and pushed it off.
• I blindly stuffed a long screwdriver up to pop the circlip off the pivot rod without thinking of where it would end up after I popped it. I found it after about 10 minutes of searching. Push slow when you pop it free!

SLIDING SHAFT:
• push the big pin with a finger
• slide the shaft to the passenger side a good amount.
• Using a screwdriver on the brake pedal side I was able to pull the big pin out just enough to lift the pedal up out of the slave and then down and out.
• The shaft did not move with my finger, it was too tight, I had to use a long needle nose pliers to move it. In order to push it back I had to use the heavy ratchet handle end from a 3/4 drive as a 'hammer' and tap it back a gazzillion times.
• The roll pin at the brake pedal end of the shaft can hit a weld on the brake pedal if is at 3 (or 9) o'clock. That will not allow the shaft to fully go back and will not allow enough of the groove on the clutch pedal end to accept the circlip. I had to roate the roll pin to be straight down and then all was well.
• Slide the large pivot pin to the right (passenger) until the clutch pedal is free.
• I did not realize how far it needed to be pushed to the 'passenger' side. I had this overwhelming fear that it would fall out, and I would be finished! So I left a little tail of the pin exposed. In doing so, I hope to 'snap' the pedal back in place which makes it easier to reinstall.
• the shaft needs to slide way more to the right than you think it should to remove the clutch pedal. Rolling the the shaft so the pin is horizontal or straight up while pushing down slightly on the brake pedal will give some more room to slide it. Then the clutch pedal is free.
• Ok, I got it out!! It require me to clamp with vice grips, wiggle and use a wrench to pry it the rest of the way using the brake pedal as leverage. Overall it only took a cool 8 hours! I'm going to have to sand it down a little as I scratched it up pretty good with the grips.
• the shaft has to go about 1/4" past the wall bit and you certainly have to either lift the clutch pedal or press a little on the brake pedal to get it over.
• Taking out the pedal was about 1 hr and most of that was knocking out the thick pin. It needs to come out a lot further than you think, I had to twist the brake/clucth pedal assembly a little so that the pin could be pushed out farther and clear the frame below the dash.

REMOVING PEDAL
• Maneuver the pedal off of the clutch master cylinder and drop.


INSTALLATION:
• Grease things up good
• covered the clevis pin assembly in grease
• you can cut off the unused arm at the top of the pedal. It makes it easier to put it back together.

INSTALLING SHAFT
• get the slave pin in the hole
• Taking off the clutch master cylinder gives you more room to juggle and align the pedals to get the large pin centered. I could do everything with just my hands and once it was aligned using a screwdriver as a lever I pushed it in. Then rotated the pin straight down and pushed it home.
• rather than try to stick my head under the dash I used a mirror to get a good view on what I was doing. Sliding the main pin back on the clutch lever wasn't all that bad


INSTALLING CLIP:
• The hardest part is then getting the large C clip back on the shaft. Had to use a visegrips on the clip and start it and then slide it on with a long screwdriver/prybar
• I made a small tool from an old screwdriver. I ground it down to where it was at least twice as thick as the clip. Then rounded it in the center to fit the outside round diameter on the clip. Then got a small piece of duct tape and taped it on to hold it centered.
• Using my wife's makeup mirror and a small LED light I could see the easily and once positioned, it was a small tap with the hand and drove it on.
• The tool and hot melt glue worked great for re-installing the C clip.
• putting the curclip back at the end was a little difficult. The way that I found it to be really easy was to tape the curclip at the very end of a screwdriver and then push it all the way on. Worked great!!
• I lined the clip up on the end of a large flathead, then secured it there with some duct tape (classic Laughing ), a small strip on each side of the clip. This held it on the screwdriver and allowed me to apply a force to seat the clip... the tape just pulled away as the clip retention force is greater than the tape adhesion. That part was the easiest of the process in my experience.
• Marking the center of the circlip helps you locate it so when you do push on it you know where to push. Here a black Sharpie maker worked.
• My hands are just too big to fit up there so I even tried a Neodium magnet to get it into place...it worked!

INSTALLING SPRING:
• it was easy to re-attach the spring

CLUTCH MASTER BOLTS:
• tighten up the bolts holding the clutch master,






CHALLENGES:

“i spent 2 hours trying to tackle this and still didn't get my clutch pedal to drop down. I'm having a heck of a time trying to get the large pin to slide over to the passenger side. It's out about 1" but it's not enough, the biznatch is on there tight! any tips???”

“Mine was on tight too. Try spraying some PB Blaster or such on it to see if that helps. What I had to do was take a pair of long heavy duty needle nose pliers and grab the exposed end of the shaft near the bracket with the nose of the pliers entended past the shaft and inch or so. I could then lever the shaft out against the bracket an 1/8 inch or so, lather, rinse, repeat. It was a PITA.

Installation was worse for me. I had to spend a long time tapping it back in even though it was greased. Knowing what I know now I'd remove it the same way but then lightly sand the shaft until it was a smooth easy fit going back in. YMMV.






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Sodo
Samba Member


Joined: July 06, 2007
Posts: 6414
Location: Western WA
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2018 8:19 pm    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

Magicmike, that was a really fantastic thing you did for theSamba.... But then you had Mathew Zelezen ......Pomfritz and Steve M. and others ahead of you, doing fantastic Samba work too.

I've chickened out a couple times and really need to get back in there. I am running out of excuses! Thanks again for detailing your preparations, and that you did it without hanging out the driver door.

My van doesn't have much pedal slop but I have a Smallcar bellhousing, which uses the Golf slave cylinder that's mis-matched to the clutch pedal geometry, (The Golf slave cylinder can be overdriven by the Vanagon pedal, and the clutch action is 'abrupt" too.) I have to remove my pedal to do the "Fred mod". Here's more ( Fred Mod" info )

Your attention to detail, ergonomics, anticipating what a person needs to know, ability to articulate it, and your follow-thru to dutifully record in on TheSamba,,,,,,is appreciated!
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EJ25, Peloquin diff, locker, transaxle oil cooler/filtration system
....KTMs, GasGas, and a Stumpjumper
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magicmike
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Joined: March 22, 2004
Posts: 16

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2018 5:50 pm    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

Thanks Sodo! Hadn't heard of the Fred Mod before.
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Robw_z
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Joined: April 28, 2007
Posts: 882

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2018 10:00 am    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

I did this... by removing the dash. Is removing the dash really so bad? I hate cramped quarters and immediately default to the “more work for more access” approach in my wrenching.

Kudos to those that accomplished this without dash removal but my sanity is too important to risk. Even with the dash removed it was hard to get that pedal out.

-Rob
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dobryan
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Joined: March 24, 2006
Posts: 12998
Location: Brookeville, MD
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2018 12:47 pm    Post subject: Re: Clutch pedal replacement in 1/2 hour! (Pics) Reply with quote

Robw_z wrote:
I did this... by removing the dash. Is removing the dash really so bad? I hate cramped quarters and immediately default to the “more work for more access” approach in my wrenching.

Kudos to those that accomplished this without dash removal but my sanity is too important to risk. Even with the dash removed it was hard to get that pedal out.

-Rob


Cheater! Wink Laughing Laughing
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Dave O
'87 Westy w/ 2002 Subaru EJ25 and Peloquin TBD

"To travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive." Robert Louis Stevenson

MD>Canada>AK>WA>OR>CA>AZ>UT>WY>SD
https://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=620646

Building a bus for travel in Europe (euroBus)
https://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=695371

The West Coast Westy
https://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=746794
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