Hello! Log in or Register   |  Help  |  Donate  |  Buy Shirts  See all banner ads | Advertise on TheSamba.com  
TheSamba.com
 
DIY Front Air Conditioning
Page: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Forum Index -> Vanagon Share: Facebook Twitter
Reply to topic
Print View
Quick sort: Show newest posts on top | Show oldest posts on top View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Howesight
Samba Member


Joined: July 02, 2008
Posts: 2447
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Howesight is offline 

PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 1:18 pm    Post subject: DIY Front Air Conditioning Reply with quote

I have been thinking and tinkering for a while with using cheap, junkyard finds to install a front AC unit in my ‘86 syncro westy. I started by thinking of vehicles that had a high heat load or area to cool and thought at first that the Audi 5000/100/A6/S6 evaporator would be good since it has to cool a vehicle with a high sun heat load due to all the glass in those cars. I was also very familiar with those cars and had access to the evaps cheaply.

However, it would take up too much space to use the Audi A6 evap, so I looked elsewhere. In the end, I found that the Audi A4 evaporator is a modern “micro-passage” design that is very compact, so it fits nicely behind the glove box in my syncro. I will still use the existing Vanagon air handler, and essentially add the evaporator as a mainly stand-alone system with a minor tie-in to the Vanagon air-handler.

So here’s the run down of my plan:

1. 16" x 22" parallel-flow condenser: See: http://www.nostalgicairparts.com/air-conditioning/16-x-22-superflow-r-134a-condenser-741.php
2. Subaru SVX (Zexel) factory compressor in stock location;
3. #8 barrier hose high-pressure line run on the passenger side of the van;
4. #12 barrier hose low-pressure line also run on the passenger side of the Van;
5. Cycling Clutch Orifice Tube (CCOT) design (easier to replace the orifice tube than a thermal expansion valve and the on-off cycling should be slightly more economical);
6. Audi-style accumulator;
7. Aftermarket thermostat;
8. home-made fabricated ABS plastic evaporator enclosure and drains;
9. Use one or two Vanagon front air-handler fans to drive air through the evaporator;
10. Add a cut-off flap to the Vanagon air-handler box to enable fresh air to be cut off (ie: recirculated air only) when the AC is in use;
11. Add an intake port on the Vanagon air-handler to receive de-humidified and cooled air from the evaporator (mainly for extra-fast defogging);
12. modify dash to enable new AC vents to be added.

13. Add an extra heater control valve on the heater-core lines to better isolate the heater core from any heat in summer. Cutting off the heater core on only one side still allows a bit of heat migration into the heater core, reducing AC efficiency.

14. The system would mainly cool through chilled air supplied to:
- the existing side vents on the far right and far left of the dash;
- plus a two-vent gang in the centre of the dash; and
- an extra vent immediately to the left of the passenger-side vent.
- But for directing chilled air to the windshield and to the footwell, I am going to try feeding a duct to the Vanagon air handler to drive air to those locations. I don't know if that will prove to be efficient, but we'll see.

So where am I now? I have:

1. installed the condenser;
2. installed the front-to-back #8 and #12 barrier hoses;
3. cut down the Subaru SVX compressor lines to prepare them to braze on new hose ends;
4. mapped out my hose fittings;
5. bought an AC hose crimper, aluminum brazing supplies and swaging tool;

Since I am proto-typing this whole thing, I am sure that there are a lot of bits and pieces I have bought that just won't be used. When I am done, I will do a complete list of the parts and materials actually used and the prices also. For non-subaru non-syncro applications, most people will run their AC hoses on the driver side of the van. This will not change the hardest part of the install which is getting the evaporator in place and connected. The reason it will still be doable with driver-side hose runs is that there is plenty of room in the front under the van to cross the AC hoses over from the driver's side to the passenger side where the evaporator will be located.
This will be a bit of a slow project since work is quite busy at the moment, but I also need a little “zen time” with my garage projects to unwind, so I will plug away at it.

I will post the first pics tonight.
_________________
'86 Syncro Westy SVX


Last edited by Howesight on Mon Jul 15, 2013 12:28 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
nij_tp
Samba Member


Joined: March 30, 2010
Posts: 130
Location: Amherst NH
nij_tp is offline 

PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 1:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds like a winter project, you've got there!!!!!! Best of luck with this and keep us updated.
_________________
1990 Vanagon GL _ Brunhilda (marked up as a Caravelle from new!) Just over 1/4 million miles, custom exhaust
1985 Vanagon GL - Josepha 140,000, Has a 2006 Forester 2.5 VVT fly by wire and custom exhaust
1989 Wolfsburg (Bluestar) - Walpurga
1989 Vanagon GL a parts bus
1984 Westfalia cut down to tow behind Westralia
2006 Audi A4 2.0T with a unitronic tune
2007 Toyota Sequoia
1976 Mercury Capri 2.3l
1986 Honda Shadow VT700
2000 Suzuki Intruder 800
1988 Kawasaki Voyager XII
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
shepherdsond
Samba Member


Joined: April 25, 2005
Posts: 437
Location: Portland, Oregon
shepherdsond is offline 

PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great project, looking forward to seeing how it goes. I have thought of doing something similar but not in nearly as much detail. I would not mind losing the glove box in return for AC. Not so sure I would want to add a center dash vent though. Thanks for sharing this.
_________________
87 Syncro Hightop Camper
3 knobs + solid shaft
2.2 Phase II Subaru
Hi-Top build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=534517
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Howesight
Samba Member


Joined: July 02, 2008
Posts: 2447
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Howesight is offline 

PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 8:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's my condenser from Nostalgic AC Parts (NAP):

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The above pic shows the bottom mounting of this 16" x 24" unit. I used an aluminum/rubber clamp and a rubber mount here.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The pic above shows the top mounting of the condenser, simply attaching a rubber mount to the lower flange of the fresh air intake duct. Since I have not finalized the hose routing, the fitting is not crimped yet.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Close-up of lower mount.




To get sufficient space for the condenser to fit, I had to space out the lower mounts on the factory radiator about 3/8". I just spaced out the mounting brackets using nuts as spacers as seen in the next 3 photos.




Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Below you can just see the accumulator and my low-side service port as I am dry-fitting it the hose going from the accumulator back to the compressor.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Below is the orifice-tube holder from the Audi A4 donor hard line set. The fittings below the orifice-tube holder will be brazed onto each end of the orifice-tube holder.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Pulling out the orifice-tube itself and pic of the filthy orifice tube.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



The orifice tube is quite inexpensive and much easier to replace than a thermal expansion valve (TXV). There are also "smart" orifice tubes available now that are dual-acting. More on this later.


Here is the evaporator unit I will be using. I have cut off the factory union block as it won't fit in the space I am using for it without first modifying the inlet and outlet tubes.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


My handy-dandy Mastercool hose crimper - - $168.00 on Amazon!

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

_________________
'86 Syncro Westy SVX
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
presslab
Samba Member


Joined: September 29, 2008
Posts: 1730
Location: Sonoma County
presslab is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2012 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think the choice of orifice tube is curious, as I thought a TXV was "superior" but I don't know for sure. It seems the TXV is more able to compensate for variables like condenser efficiency (airflow) and it works well even if not charged perfectly.

Even with the TXV on my Behr system it still seems the temperature variation is a bit too much when cycling. The Behr cycles the compressor by using a thermistor on the evaporator. With the compressor on it seems too cold, and then off it obviously warms up quickly and is too warm. The Goldilocks syndrome. Laughing

Anyway at work we are doing some electronics for a servo controlled TXV. Something like this would be really cool. Idea


Have you considered piping cold air into the center tunnel, and up the B-pillars to the rear area? I always wanted to modify my Behr system to do this, to give the rear passengers some cold air. The fans in the Behr certainly have enough push to do this!

Thanks for your documentation!
_________________
1986 Vanagon Westfalia EJ25
1988 Subaru GL-10 EJ20G --- 2000 Honda XR650L
2010 Titus El Guapo --- 2011 On-One 456 Ti
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
insyncro
Banned


Joined: March 07, 2002
Posts: 15087
Location: New York
insyncro is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2012 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice crimper.

Thank you for the pictorial.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Howesight
Samba Member


Joined: July 02, 2008
Posts: 2447
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Howesight is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2012 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

presslab wrote:
I think the choice of orifice tube is curious, as I thought a TXV was "superior" but I don't know for sure. It seems the TXV is more able to compensate for variables like condenser efficiency (airflow) and it works well even if not charged perfectly.

Even with the TXV on my Behr system it still seems the temperature variation is a bit too much when cycling. The Behr cycles the compressor by using a thermistor on the evaporator. With the compressor on it seems too cold, and then off it obviously warms up quickly and is too warm. The Goldilocks syndrome. Laughing

Anyway at work we are doing some electronics for a servo controlled TXV. Something like this would be really cool. Idea


Have you considered piping cold air into the center tunnel, and up the B-pillars to the rear area? I always wanted to modify my Behr system to do this, to give the rear passengers some cold air. The fans in the Behr certainly have enough push to do this!

Thanks for your documentation!


Hey Presslab:

Thanks for your interest and comments!

So, my reasons for choosing the CCOT system instead of TXV were similar to OEM's choice of CCOT. Note that Audi vehicles almost exclusively used CCOT systems until very recently and almost all VW applications used TXV systems. Reasons:

1. TXV is very senstive to dirt and causes the system to cease functioning if dirt clogs it. On A4 Audis, if they had a TXV mounted on the evaporator (which is the standard location), a simple TXV replacement would require a 10 to 12 hour (dealership estimates) repair since the dash has to be removed to access the TXV. I guess Audi did not want to incur that kind of expense on warranty repairs. So, on the A4 and A6 (don't know about other models), the orifice tube is easily accessible under the hood of the vehicle with almost no other disassembly required.
2. CCOT systems use a sensitive low-pressure switch that cycles the the compressor on and off at low-side pressures that correlate with the evap core being at just above freezing temp (for shut off) and about 4 degrees above freezing for re-starting the compressor. This makes them operate with efficiency similar to TXV systems, but without the benefit of "superheat".
3. Most Audis (and the SVX also) use a variable-displacement compressor controlled by the climate control head (CCU). This reduces the amount of cycling somewhat and reduces, presumably, the load placed on the compressor.
4. The filter screen on the orifice tube protects the evaporator and the compressor somewhat by preventing debris from circulating.
5. In case I decide to add a second evaporator in the rear of the vehicle.

I am glad to hear you know something about electronic contols. I would like to be able to utilize the variable-displacement capability of the SVX compressor which uses a variable current signal from the Subaru CCU (which I am not using) to vary the compressor output. With no signal, the default position is for maximum compressor output. I'd like to know how I can do a hack to simulate that signal. I also would like to use a modern infinitely variable blower speed control, but have no idea how to set up one of those. I can PM you the relevant portion of the SVX tech manual on the variable displacement compressor control system if you like.


Regarding rear area cooling, I did think about using the "B-Pillar" approach and will leave my system set up to enable that approach if it seems to be needed. My thought was that it would, at a minium, enable me to have cool air vents located beside the driver and passenger doors for even more cool air on the front occupants.

I was a bit concerned about running chilled air through the B-pillars because I thought all that steel would heat up my chilled air too much. We'll have to see when I get to that stage.

My thoughts about rear cooling were, instead, to install a second Audi A4 evaporator right in front of the rear heater. If you look at your rear heater box, you will notice there is about 3 or 4 inches of space between the heater core itself and the front panel of the Westfalia bench seat through which the heated air is ducted. That's just enough space to install an A4 evaporator core. I would put some fins in the outlet to direct the chilled air upward and maybe a separate duct or two under the seat to the sides if the one duct was not effective.

For that install, (if rear cooling is required - - yet to be determined), I would use a TXV on the evaporator. This is the standard approach for dual-zone two evaporator systems - - CCOT orifice tube for the front/main system and TXV for the rear/auxilliary evaporator.

For the comfort of Goldilocks, I could use a second pressure cycling switch connected to an "Econ" button which cycles the compressor off at a higher low-side pressure and cycles it on again at a higher low-side pressure also, effectively raising average vent temps. I will not be using an air-mixing system, so I might need a "Goldilocks" hack like that to ward off frostbite.

I know I can fit one Vanagon fan in the confined area I am installing the evap into. I am going to trial fit a second fan to sit right beside the first one. Since the system is mainly a recirculating system, I want to keep fan noise to a minimum. My theory is that two Vanagon fans on the lowest speed setting would be quieter than one on the middle speed setting, and so on.

Anyway, I am enjoying this project and hoping to develop a good, usable and inexpensive DIY front AC hack others might try also. The great unknown: Is the Audi A4 evaporator up to the task? I'm going to hedge my bets by using RedTek instead of R134A, even though my system will be designed and installed to enable using R134A.
_________________
'86 Syncro Westy SVX
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Howesight
Samba Member


Joined: July 02, 2008
Posts: 2447
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Howesight is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2012 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the compressor end, the SVX compressor hoses need to be adapted to attach to my #8 and #12 barrier hose. Factory hoses are almost always made from what is called reduced hose, which is smaller OD hose used to save weight. My hose is standard, and the hard lines do not fit. So, I have to braze on fitting ends that will connect to the hose.

Below are 3 pics of the suction side fitting including the factory muffler which reduces compressor noise. The third pic shows that same fitting with the #12 hose fitting adaptor dry-fitted for brazing.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



On the discharge side of the compressor, the fitting points the wrong way. I need to cut off a 90 degree portion and add a 90 degree hose end. Here is the fitting. The hose end points toward the rear of the vehicle when installed on the compressor, but I need it to point forward.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



So, I will cut off the excess 90 degree turn and cut off the nut on the 90 degree hose end and braze them together in the orientation shown below:



Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

_________________
'86 Syncro Westy SVX
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Crankey
Samba Member


Joined: July 11, 2004
Posts: 2043

Crankey is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2012 10:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

boy I am digging this alot ! thanks for the documentation. I wish you much luck with it. I could defiantly use front AC and this looks like it could be alot better than rehabbing an old behr unit.

Last edited by Crankey on Wed Nov 28, 2012 11:09 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Classifieds Feedback
MarkWard
Samba Member


Joined: February 09, 2005
Posts: 12306
Location: Palm Beach County, Florida
MarkWard is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2012 7:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Crankey wrote:
boy I am digging this alot ! thanks for the documentation. I with you much luck with it. I could defiantly use front AC and this looks like it could be alot better than rehabbing an old behr unit.


Crankey, do a Goggle search for Blake Heinlein and vanagon AC. He completely documented installing a Vintage Air system into his vanagon. I did the same in ours.
_________________
1982 Vanagon Camper with ALH TDI conversion.
1990 Vanagon Camper Syncro conversion.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Howesight
Samba Member


Joined: July 02, 2008
Posts: 2447
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Howesight is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 4:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A little more progress over the last few days. I have been doing the "dry fitting" for the evaporator, trying to figure out the best way to shoehorn the A4 evaporator and the Vanagon fan into the space available. Here's my progress in pictures:

This is the area where the evap and fan will go. The wiring needs to be re-located. There is enough wire in the harness to allow this.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Notice that the wiper motor takes up (wastes, in fact) a lot of space. The arrow shows the direction in which I will re-clock the wiper motor.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.





Trial fitting to determine refrigerant plumbing. The yellow arrow points to the low-pressure (suction) side and will have a 90 degree #12 male insert fitting brazed on and passed through one of the two areas marked in black. This puts the hose right behind the passenger side headlight area. The red arrow points to the high pressure line which will have a 90 degree #8 male insert fitting brazed on.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Dry fit #1: As it turns out, this is too far to the front of the van to permit the fan to be mounted.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Notice that I have re-located the wiring that normally sits on top of that horizontal box-beam. I put the glove box in temporarily to see how much of it will have to be trimmed. It is only the distance from back to front that will be reduced. The width and vertical depth will remain the same.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



The yellow arrows show the flange that needs to come out to maximize space for the evaporator. I have the glove box in checking for fit again.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Here, you can see that the flange has been removed. Easy work with my sawzall. The yellow arrows show the direction for re-clocking the wiper motor.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Now I have re-clocked the wiper motor to give me the desired clearance. I'll clean and lube the wiper mechanism while I am in here (no pics - - sorry). I'll also put in better washer nozzles, using the Smart Car nozzles per BlackDogVan's suggestion. The yellow arrows show the old locating holes and the new positions for them.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Trial fit of the fan. This was before I came up with the idea of clocking the wiper motor. I am going to make brackets to go on each side of the fan out of ABS plastic, get the mounting holes for the brackets set up, and then use ABS glue to attach the brackets to the fan. Here are three views of the trial fit to determine location.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



This trial fit shows the evap on a diagonal. The idea is to allow the evap box I will fabricate a bit more room and to turn the airflow slightly. Three ducts will point toward the driver's side and only one duct will point toward the passenger side to feed the passenger side vent. Trial fitting before fabricating the evap box allows me to know where jogs and dips in the box and ducting will have to occur.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.




This picture shows, in yellow, where I plan to duct chilled air from the evap into the Vanagon air handler. I am putting in flaps and an actuator that will close off the fresh-air intake on the air handler when the AC is switched on. This will enable me to have dehumidified air for defrosting the windshield. This will only be a small part of the AC air distribution. The main ducts will connect to the driver side vent, passenger side vent, and two Vanagon vents side by side where the radio used to sit. The radio will move to the right (passenger) side, but still within reach of me (I have long arms).
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.




This pic shows the better placement of the fan available after re-clocking the wiper motor.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

_________________
'86 Syncro Westy SVX
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
WLD*WSTY
Samba Member


Joined: November 04, 2009
Posts: 438
Location: Arizona
WLD*WSTY is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2012 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Howesight wrote:
Here, you can see that the flange has been removed. Easy work with my sawzall.


You may wish to limit the weakening of crash protection structures as much as possible...
_________________
'82 SyncroWesty, the first ever conversion.'06 Subaru 2.5L
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Gallery Classifieds Feedback
morymob
Samba Member


Joined: November 09, 2007
Posts: 4683
Location: east-tn
morymob is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 4:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

While u re-clocked(?) the wiper motor , is it POSSIBLE to have the motor 180 degrees 'turned', sure would help in some clearance i need to mount a complete unit with the face of glove box covering it up.Motor just under corner of blower section holding it to the front.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Howesight
Samba Member


Joined: July 02, 2008
Posts: 2447
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Howesight is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

morymob wrote:
While u re-clocked(?) the wiper motor , is it POSSIBLE to have the motor 180 degrees 'turned', sure would help in some clearance i need to mount a complete unit with the face of glove box covering it up.Motor just under corner of blower section holding it to the front.


There is not enough space to turn the wiper motor 180 degrees since the tail end of the motor will be against the sheet metal or against the Vanagon heater box. Any re-clocking other than 120 degrees requires drilling new mounting holes for the wiper motor as I have done. I turned my wiper motor as far as the space permits - - there is no room to go further.
_________________
'86 Syncro Westy SVX
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
KLSteward
Samba Member


Joined: November 28, 2012
Posts: 11

KLSteward is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a hell of a project. I hope it works out, keep us posted! If you get a tutorial up I'll be giving it a go in a heartbeat haha
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Classifieds Feedback
Crankey
Samba Member


Joined: July 11, 2004
Posts: 2043

Crankey is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

rsxsr wrote:
Crankey wrote:
boy I am digging this alot ! thanks for the documentation. I with you much luck with it. I could defiantly use front AC and this looks like it could be alot better than rehabbing an old behr unit.


Crankey, do a Goggle search for Blake Heinlein and vanagon AC. He completely documented installing a Vintage Air system into his vanagon. I did the same in ours.


I have read that build page. a good read for sure. but using the air box for the heater sounds like it could be a great idea too...looking more complicated as it progresses but hoping for a path that is either less cash for parts or less work building stuff. Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Classifieds Feedback
Howesight
Samba Member


Joined: July 02, 2008
Posts: 2447
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Howesight is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

KLSteward wrote:
That's a hell of a project. I hope it works out, keep us posted! If you get a tutorial up I'll be giving it a go in a heartbeat haha


Yeah . . . I am noticing that I am giving a bit too much detail here with all the different configurations I am trying. Going forward, I will limit the pics and discussion to the final configuration at each step.

I know I am spending more time and more money on parts not used than would be the case if I knew every step in advance. I am going to make and post some templates for the evap box and evaporator connections as the measurements will be critical to a nice, clean installation. I've learned quite a bit about AC fittings and hose etc in the process that would have saved money and time if I knew in advance.
_________________
'86 Syncro Westy SVX
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
JPrato
Samba Member


Joined: December 15, 2006
Posts: 775
Location: Livonia, NY
JPrato is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 1:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Howsight, I'm enjoying following your thought process, so I for one like all the directions and options you are trying. I took the easy way out and put in a Vintage Air system. It looks like you doing it this way for the fun of the challenge. Very cool. Thanks for sharing!
_________________
Joe

06 Subaru Legacy turbo (how am I gonna fit this sucker into the Westy....)
87 Syncro Tin Top project
84 Westy, 2.5L Subaru power
46 Cessna 140
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Gallery Classifieds Feedback
shepherdsond
Samba Member


Joined: April 25, 2005
Posts: 437
Location: Portland, Oregon
shepherdsond is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 3:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know you are up for the challenge but I wonder how much effort it is worth to add dehumidified windshield de-misting capability? I know that if I follow in your footsteps that if I can save significant time and/or money I would not place a high priority on this. I would be happy just to have cold air. Maybe it is not that much extra work though..
_________________
87 Syncro Hightop Camper
3 knobs + solid shaft
2.2 Phase II Subaru
Hi-Top build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=534517
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Howesight
Samba Member


Joined: July 02, 2008
Posts: 2447
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Howesight is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

shepherdsond wrote:
I know you are up for the challenge but I wonder how much effort it is worth to add dehumidified windshield de-misting capability? I know that if I follow in your footsteps that if I can save significant time and/or money I would not place a high priority on this. I would be happy just to have cold air. Maybe it is not that much extra work though..


I think that this aspect will actually be one of the very easiest since there is a fairly direct path from the evap to the area on the heater box where the chilled/dehumidified air would be ducted. Plus, ABS plastic is super easy to work with - - I am told. We'll see shortly.

I have to say that it is even possible that the Vanagon heater box might, on its own, be sufficient as an air distribution system drawing air through the evaporator box without a fan behind the evaporator box. I do plan to test this theory, although my assumption in my rough design was that this approach would not work sufficiently well. I'll test the theory because anything that simplifies installation probably helps reliability too.

On that score, I hope to make the evaporator box in two or even three pieces to allow servicing and installation of a TXV if I change my mind about the CCOT approach. The only thing currently bothering me about the CCOT approach is that the accumulator is quite large and will only fit in one specific spot in my install. The TXV allows a much smaller reciever-drier to be used (instead of an accumulator) which allows installation in a number of locations.
_________________
'86 Syncro Westy SVX
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic    Forum Index -> Vanagon All times are Mountain Standard Time/Pacific Daylight Savings Time
Page: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Page 1 of 5

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

About | Help! | Advertise | Donate | Premium Membership | Privacy/Terms of Use | Contact Us | Site Map
Copyright © 1996-2020, Everett Barnes. All Rights Reserved.
Not affiliated with or sponsored by Volkswagen of America | Forum powered by phpBB