Hello! Log in or Register   |  Help  |  Donate  |  Buy Shirts  See all banner ads | Advertise on TheSamba.com  
TheSamba.com
 
My First VW, It's a 69 Bay Window Deluxe
Page: Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
Forum Index -> Bay Window Bus Share: Facebook Twitter
Reply to topic
Print View
Quick sort: Show newest posts on top | Show oldest posts on top View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Tcash
Samba Member


Joined: July 20, 2011
Posts: 12844
Location: San Jose, California, USA
Tcash is offline 

PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2014 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi
This is a good time to inspect your shifter bushings, before you pull the engine.
Shifter Parts ID
Good Luck
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 105
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tcash wrote:
Hi
This is a good time to inspect your shifter bushings, before you pull the engine.
Shifter Parts ID
Good Luck


Thanks for the link. All of the joints on the shifting linkage are worn out, sloppy, and need to be replaced.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 105
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 10:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I spent some time on the bus this weekend. I am now juggling two projects. The engine on my commuter bike blew up last Monday so I am in the middle of repairing this and tearing into the bus.

I was able to pull the engine, transmission, and gas tank.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The New Transmission:

I found a spare transmission locally and picked it up. Supposedly everything is fine with it but I guess I won't know until I install it and run it. Is there any way to test a tranny before installation? It had oil in it and the oil was clean.

I pulled the nose and clutch bell housing. The ring gear looks fine. The hockey stick is worn out as well as the bushings that support it. I was going to replace all these parts. I was also planning on replacing the input shaft seal.

The Engine:

I pulled all the tin from the engine. It looks like all the pieces are there though many screws are missing. The exhaust is pretty corroded. I was going to throw on an after market one for now.

The engine is covered in oil. I don't know where the leak is so I will probably do a complete tear down and rebuild.

Is there anything that should be changed from OEM (oil cooler, pump, etc...) or leave it as VW intended?

The Old Transmission:

This is the transmission with a bad second gear. For now I am going to put it aside until I can rebuild it. I know this is involved and requires special tools but that is OK.

When I pulled the drive shafts, on one of the shafts, the volume between the final drive cup and the CVD was full of transmission oil. I am only guessing that the cap seal was faulty.

of the four CVD's two were worn out. I was planning on replacing the two CVD's, cleaning and re-greasing the other two and replacing all the boots. One of the CVD's was missing the tin cap. Do these caps come with the new CVD's?

Misc:

As I remove parts from the bus, they are in various stages of decay. Most are just starting to flake off the paint/coating, some are starting to rust. Is there a good practice for preserving these parts?

I was thinking of cleaning and stripping if needed then painting/powder coating, depending on the parts. I am curious if there is a best practice for part from the under carriage that are exposed to the elements.


Last edited by Jack_O_Trades on Sat Mar 03, 2018 11:46 am; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Tcash
Samba Member


Joined: July 20, 2011
Posts: 12844
Location: San Jose, California, USA
Tcash is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is there any way to test a tranny before installation?
Tranny Refresh..... how far to go?

I was going to replace all these parts.
You will need the tranny code to order parts.
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

http://longenterprises.com/
http://longenterprises.com/Rebuilders_course_photo_gallery/index.htm
http://www.longenterprises.com/diagram_folder/diagramlist.htm
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/classifieds/detail.php?id=1565835
http://www.longenterprises.com/parts_list/rebuildkits.htm

Is there anything that should be changed from OEM (oil cooler, pump, etc...) or leave it as VW intended?
Doghouse cooler and tin.
http://www.vw-resource.com/oil_cooler.html

One of the CVD's was missing the tin cap. Do these caps come with the new CVD's?
The tin caps do not come with the CV Joints. I do not know where to get them.
CV Joint Service (Lobro)
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Is there a good practice for preserving these parts?
Rust converter primer and paint. Most powder coat wheels, bumpers and tin.

I am curious if there is a best practice for part from the under carriage that are exposed to the elements.
Some strip it to original paint, Undercoat it or Wasoyl it.
http://www.roversnorth.com/Manufacturers/19

Good Luck
Tcash
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
busdaddy
Samba Member


Joined: February 12, 2004
Posts: 40020
Location: Surrey B.C. Canada, Land of the giant flying moose!
busdaddy is online now 

PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tcash wrote:
Is there anything that should be changed from OEM (oil cooler, pump, etc...) or leave it as VW intended?
Doghouse cooler and tin.
http://www.vw-resource.com/oil_cooler.html

Agreed, not an absolute necessity but definitely an improvement and it doesn't even show when the engine is installed, but make sure it's a real German shroud (only available used). Also consider drilling and tapping for full flow oiling so you can add a filter later if you wish (easy when the engine's apart, almost impossible assembled) and replacing the gallery plugs with screwed in ones.
_________________
Rust NEVER sleeps and stock never goes out of style.

Wanted, OG paint 1971 Niagara blue decklid.

Stop dead photo links! Post your photos to The Samba Gallery!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
secretsubmariner
Champagne Wrangler


Joined: January 08, 2011
Posts: 2861
Location: Tulsa, OK
secretsubmariner is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Dude, that 4 drawer setup beneath the rear seat is super cool. Never seen anything like that before.

I love the color,
I love the bus,
I love the sunroof,

Enjoy it!!
_________________
-Tony
1978 Champagne Edition II (Mar)
1978 Champagne Edition II (Feb - sold)
1978 Champagne Edition II (Jan - sold)
1978 Westfalia Auto Deluxe (sold)

78Kombi wrote:
dude but im a nigerian prince
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Instagram Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Lionhart94010
Samba Member


Joined: January 04, 2005
Posts: 1382
Location: SF Bay Aria / Silicon & Central Valley
Lionhart94010 is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jack_O_Trades wrote:


Is there anything that should be changed from OEM (oil cooler, pump, etc...) or leave it as VW intended?


Off the top of my head, you will gain reliability and longer life if you:

Add full flow oil filter-

Change to electronic ignition(electronic points at minimum)-

Change your valve adjusters from stock to swivel feet/elephant feet-

Have the throttle shaft of your carb re-bushed by a VW carb pro-

Teflon steel breaded fuel lines-

Add a $250 Air fuel gauge so you can tune your engine like a pro, CA fuel has 10% ethanol = factory jetting is no longer adequate, and you will drive yourself crazy trying to get it to run properly without one ;0)

Wire the fuel line from carb so it does not pull out and start a fire(or tap it and put in a threaded fitting)

Add and oil pressure & temp gauge; as well as a Dakota Digital Cylinder head temp gauges, to keep you from frying your engine (oil temp will do the same just has slower response)

Use a good Synthetic engine oil rated for air cooled engines with proper additives(after break in if you put in new P&Cs)

Get a degree pulley and double check its TDC for accuracy-
_________________
Current VWs 71 T2 Westy SO-72/6(Miami), 71 Crew Cab, 72 KG GT;0) 12 JSW TDI
Other owned VWs 59, 68 1500s, 69 & 71 Bugs; 72 & 73 S-Bugs; 67 Westy, 67 Deluxe, Other 71 DC
VW technical information sights
thesamba - www.ratwell.com - www.shoptalkforums.com/ - www.vw-resource.com - http://www.type2.com/
http://bobhooversblog.blogspot.com/ - www.aircooled.net/gnrlsite/resource/articles.htm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 105
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2014 2:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just a quick update.

I started digging into the engine this weekend, taking it apart and starting to clean parts. This is a huge greasy mess. I think there is more oil on the outside of the engine than inside.

Before I tore down the engine I did a compression test buy hand. I pulled the plugs and the intake manifold was off. I then rotated the crankshaft 4 times for each piston. I was only getting about 30 psi on each cylinder except for #1. This had a horrible, audible leak between the cylinder and head. I wonder if I was doing something wrong with only 30 psi of compression. I'm amazed the engine even ran with power with this kind of blow-by.

I have started ordering parts for the engine. I would like to try to salvage the heads. The single port heads seam to be harder to come by.

I still need to pull the oil pump and then split the case.

Quick question on the pulley. I may need to replace it because the crankcase ventilation blow-by helical groove on the pulley is beat to hell from someone hitting it with a blunt object (not me). Any thoughts on the sand seal pulleys? It seams they may do a better job of sealing but I don't know that much about them.

I also decoded the vin plate and ordered some paint/rust supplies to start addressing the surface rust. I am hoping to get the body sealed up before the rain comes in a couple of months.


Also had a question about these brackets. What are they for? I'm guessing gas tank or water jug.

Edit: The brackets are originally for the passenger seat, they are crisp to secure the seat. I have no idea why they were mounted outside the but. I have since deleted those holes.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


My flywheel removal tool. The gland nut was on there pretty tight. If I had to guesstimate, it probably took 250-350 ft-lbs of torque to get it off.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Last edited by Jack_O_Trades on Sat Mar 03, 2018 11:53 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 105
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2014 12:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just another update to the RR project. I tore apart the motor and will be replacing most all of the guts.

Upon closer inspection, each cylinder on the head had multiple cracks between the valves seats and the spark plug hole. Instead of going with rebuilt SP heads I will be converting to DP heads.

The crankshaft had wear and scoring o the bearing surfaces. The bearings also showed signs of galling and scoring. So I am replacing the bearings, crankshaft, and connecting rods.

The camshaft had pitting on the lobes and the gear was actually missing an entire tooth with signs of corrosion. So this will get replaced.

The pistons are also getting replaced just because.

While I wait on parts, I am working on the transmission and shifting linkage. I have replaced all the bushing, boots, couplers, etc on the shifting mechanism. I have also treated any parts with rust and painted them to help protect from future rust.

I also started working on rebuilding the drive shafts. Mostly this consisted of replacing two of the four CVD's that were sloppy and disassembling and cleaning the other two CVD's (yes, I kept them separate so as to not mix the matched parts).

Today I took a break from cleaning parts and decided to do something fun and machine a shifter knob. I was going for a mix of old and new. Unfortunately, I botched it on the last step. The engraving is about .010" too deep.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Last edited by Jack_O_Trades on Mon Mar 19, 2018 6:17 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
notchboy
Samba Member


Joined: April 27, 2002
Posts: 17708
Location: Seattle WA
notchboy is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2014 6:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks pretty cool to me!
_________________
t3kg wrote:

OK, this thread is over. You win.

Jason "notchboy" Weigel
1964 1500 S
1964 T34 S Convertible
1974 Westfalia Hardtop Campmobile
1977 Westfalia Camper pop-top
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Wasted youth
Samba Member


Joined: July 06, 2012
Posts: 3999
Location: California's Hot and Smoggy Central Valley
Wasted youth is online now 

PostPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2014 9:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's obvious you like wrenching at all levels, so take this with a grain of salt...but after reading about all the internal parts you plan on replacing, I wonder if your time and money is better spent purchasing a short block, or maybe even a long block... from a reputable builder?
_________________
1968 Double Cab truck, 1973 Auto trans bus, 1978 Auto trans Sunroof bus with A/C and a 1987 Auto trans Westfalia.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 105
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2014 9:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wasted youth/adulthood wrote:
It's obvious you like wrenching at all levels, so take this with a grain of salt...but after reading about all the internal parts you plan on replacing, I wonder if your time and money is better spent purchasing a short block, or maybe even a long block... from a reputable builder?


Thank you for the advice. I am a big fan of learning from my mistakes. If I don't do the work myself, then I will have had no mistakes to learn from.

Short Story:

Last year I had to rebuild the transaxle in my Commuter car (Mazda Protege). The ring gear on the differential was riveted to the diff body and had popped the rivets causing a catastrophic failure of the transaxle. I rebuilt the diff and welded the gear to the body (per other peoples experiences). I buttoned up the tranny, installed it into the car, and went to install the splined drive shafts (they basically slip into the output gears of the differential. Well, on side went on fine, and the other would not, Turns out when I assembled the differential, I didn't pay close attention to lining up the two output gears and they were off by one tooth. I had to pull the tranny again, take it apart, rebuild the diff, and do it all over again in reverse. That was a stupid mistake but a good learning experience and one that I don't regret.

Though I have minimal experience with four-stroke engines, I do understand the fundamental principals behind them and the mechanics associated with them. I am also riding on a high of having just finished rebuilding the engine (top-end) for my motor cycle with success.

I also have some good resources to help me with the engine build. I have a coworker who just finished building a 1776 engine from the ground up with success and I have been reading the Muir and Bentley books which seem like a good resources for doing an engine overhaul.

All the above probably comes off cocky, that is not my intention. I am just stubborn when it comes to doing things for myself.

With that being said, Are there specific nuances with the engine build that I should be aware of? The only one that I came across was getting the right cam gear to match the gear spacing to the bore of the crankshaft and camshaft. My cam gear does not have a number on it so this indicates it's a zero gear. That being said. When I was looking for cams I didn't see anyone offering option for +7 to -7 gears. Do they exist?


Last edited by Jack_O_Trades on Tue Sep 16, 2014 10:30 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Wasted youth
Samba Member


Joined: July 06, 2012
Posts: 3999
Location: California's Hot and Smoggy Central Valley
Wasted youth is online now 

PostPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2014 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jack_O_Trades wrote:
All the above probably comes off cocky, that is not my intention. I am just stubborn when it comes to doing things for myself.


It's not cocky, in fact, that is the best way to approach it.

Jack_O_Trades wrote:
With that being said, Are there specific nuances with the engine build that I should be aware of? The only one that I came across was getting the right cam gear to match the gear spacing to the bore of the crankshaft and camshaft. My cam gear does not have a number on it so this indicates it's a zero gear. That being said. When I was looking for cams I didn't see anyone offering option for +7 to -7 gears. Do they exist?


I do not have the experience to answer that question, but I did read a couple of threads regarding the difficulties in matching cam/crank sets for Type 4 engines. Didn't sound too promising, but I have no idea about the Type 1 engines.

As an aside, I bet you'll like the dual port heads!
_________________
1968 Double Cab truck, 1973 Auto trans bus, 1978 Auto trans Sunroof bus with A/C and a 1987 Auto trans Westfalia.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Lionhart94010
Samba Member


Joined: January 04, 2005
Posts: 1382
Location: SF Bay Aria / Silicon & Central Valley
Lionhart94010 is offline 

PostPosted: Wed Sep 17, 2014 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Re:
Quote:
Are there specific nuances
Yes, many most arent aware of ;0)

If you want some interesting reading and nuances you wont find in any manual, you might want to check out Bob Hovers blog post lots of nuances there :0)

This is just one of his set of articles...

Basic Jugs - I
http://bobhooversblog.blogspot.com/2007/07/basic-jugs-i.html


Basic Jugs - II

http://bobhooversblog.blogspot.com/2007/07/basic-jugs-ii.html


Basic Jugs - III

http://bobhooversblog.blogspot.com/2007/07/basic-jugs-iii.html


Basic Jugs - IV

http://bobhooversblog.blogspot.com/2007/07/basic-jugs-iv.html

Basic Jugs - IV 1/2

http://bobhooversblog.blogspot.com/2007/07/basic-jugs-iv-12.html
_________________
Current VWs 71 T2 Westy SO-72/6(Miami), 71 Crew Cab, 72 KG GT;0) 12 JSW TDI
Other owned VWs 59, 68 1500s, 69 & 71 Bugs; 72 & 73 S-Bugs; 67 Westy, 67 Deluxe, Other 71 DC
VW technical information sights
thesamba - www.ratwell.com - www.shoptalkforums.com/ - www.vw-resource.com - http://www.type2.com/
http://bobhooversblog.blogspot.com/ - www.aircooled.net/gnrlsite/resource/articles.htm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 105
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Sat Sep 20, 2014 12:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lionhart94010 wrote:
Re:
Quote:
Are there specific nuances
Yes, many most arent aware of ;0)

If you want some interesting reading and nuances you wont find in any manual, you might want to check out Bob Hovers blog post lots of nuances there :0)

This is just one of his set of articles...



Thanks for the links. there is a lot of good information in those blog posts.

Question on painting the cylinders, Is there a recommended type of paint?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 105
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Sat Sep 20, 2014 1:43 am    Post subject: Replaced Battery Tray and Rebuilt Fuel Sending Unit Reply with quote

Today I was able to put some good time into the bus. With the engine, tranny, and gas tank out. I wanted to take the opportunity to replace the battery tray. The original was almost gone with serious rot due to battery leakage.

I was trying to figure out the best way to remove the panel without causing too much damage to the surrounding panels. I decided to just cut it into little bits with the air saw and prying them out as I went along.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


With the panel completely removed, I went in and removed the paint in preparation for welding.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Once the sanding was done, it was time for a test fit of the new panel. The fit was pretty nice. I had to do minimal work on the new panel to get it to drop in.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Instead of doing a full bead around the panel (overkill IMHO) I decided to skip weld it in place.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


And then I sealed it with paintable caulking. This is meant for home use, so I don't know how it will do in the bus. Once it's dry and cured I will primer and paint.

Edit: This was when I didn't know any better, I wish I would have used seam sealer for this.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Welding from the inside caused the body to become less than perfect on the outside. I flattened it out to the best of my ability and smoothed it out with filler. I laid it on thicker than needed and will sand it down in a day or so.

Edit: I wish I would have used Duraglass for this instead of Bondo. I have since stripped this down and cleaned it up.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The Gas Tank:

I am also in the middle of cleaning up the gas tank. I pulled the fuel sending unit which was not working. I didn't get any before photos but basically, the float was fused to the bottom of the guide shaft due to the dried out fuel.

After completely dismantling the assembly and removing all the crusties, I had smooth motion of the float and my nichrome wire was still in tact. However, I had no electrical connection.

The body of the sending unit is supposed to be electrically common to a copper spring plate that holds one end of the nichrome wire. This copper plate had insulated itself from the body due to oxidation/corrosion. I went to town with my dremel cleaning things up even more. The fix though was kind of a kluge, but works. I had to shove an xacto blade between the two parts and snapping of the wedged in tip. This created the needed electrical short between the two pieces. There wasn't really any other way around this unless I drilled out the copper rivet for the signal contact. I didn't want to do this though.

So now I had a circuit though not a very good one. As I moved the float up and down the guide, the resistance would jump around. To fix this, I took 600 grit sand paper to the nichrome wire and to the brushes on the float. After cleaning these up it works perfectly with a nice variable resistance from top to bottom. When the tank is empty it ready around 80 ohm and when the tank is full it reads around 2 ohms.

The is the unit ready to go back in it's tube and installed.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I am lucky enough to have the next week off from work so I hope to get much done. The last bits of my engine arrive on Monday so I can hopefully start working on that rebuild. I am also in the middle of rebuilding my 205T distributor but am stuck because I need to replace the two fiber washers. I have contacted Glen, and will wait to see if he can help me source these.


Last edited by Jack_O_Trades on Sat Mar 03, 2018 12:05 pm; edited 4 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Lionhart94010
Samba Member


Joined: January 04, 2005
Posts: 1382
Location: SF Bay Aria / Silicon & Central Valley
Lionhart94010 is offline 

PostPosted: Sat Sep 20, 2014 7:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:


Question on painting the cylinders, Is there a recommended type of paint?



In first link; Gloss Black Rust-Oleum or "Rustoleum Flat Black" with some extra Mineral Spirits... see extract from first URL link...

From R.S.H
Quote:

You'll love this next step! A chance for you to exercise your artistry in paint. Herez whatcha need: Some flat black paint. If you don't have any, make some by mixing a tad of naptha with glossy black paint. If using Rustoleum Flat Black in the half-pint can as shown in the photo, you'll need to thin it with about an ounce of mineral spirits. But before opening the can, make sure it is at room temperature. Then shake it for at least two minutes. Don't guess; check a clock and give it an honest two-minute shake-up. Provide yourself with a stirring stick, open the can, add the mineral spirits and stir for at least one minute.

_________________
Current VWs 71 T2 Westy SO-72/6(Miami), 71 Crew Cab, 72 KG GT;0) 12 JSW TDI
Other owned VWs 59, 68 1500s, 69 & 71 Bugs; 72 & 73 S-Bugs; 67 Westy, 67 Deluxe, Other 71 DC
VW technical information sights
thesamba - www.ratwell.com - www.shoptalkforums.com/ - www.vw-resource.com - http://www.type2.com/
http://bobhooversblog.blogspot.com/ - www.aircooled.net/gnrlsite/resource/articles.htm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 105
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2014 11:02 pm    Post subject: Rebuilding the Nose Cone Reply with quote

It's been a little over a week and I have made some good progress on the bus. I wanted to get the transmissions installed and off my bench. The only thing that I was planning on doing to the new/used transmission was rebuilding the nose cone, the clutch TO bearing mechanism, and replacing the input shaft seal. The fluid that was drained from the transmission was nice and clean so I have to assume things are good inside without digging too much into it. If there is a better way to check on the guts without taking it apart, speak now or .....

Rebuilding the nose cone turned out to be a small challenge. I guess nothing is ever easy if it's done right. The rebuild would consist of replacing the bushings, and the worn out hockey stick. Everything else looked good including the little spherical bearing that the hockey stick engages. Keep in mind that I have two transmissions to pick an choose from. I picked up the hardened hockey stick from Weddel Industries and the bushing kit from various sources.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


There are two bushings on the nose cone. In inside and outside for lack of a better term. The outside one is flared so that a shaft seal can be pressed into it. For the inside bushing, I had two options to go with, a typical solid bushing or the OEM split style bushing. The split style is easier to install and remove. If you go with this style I suggest collapsing it with some safety wire. This makes it easier to press in.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I found, once I installed the split style bushing, there was still an unacceptable amount of slop between the bushing and the hockey stick. So, I went with the solid bushing. Before pressing in the solid bushing, it had a good slip fit with the hockey stick. However, once pressed in, it shrunk and need to be bored. I didn't have the correct size reamer, so I went with my boring head on the mill.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is a short clip showing the boring operation, taking off a couple thousandths.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I had the same issue with the outside bushing. Once pressed in, it had to be bored out.

With the hard work done, the rest was pretty straight forward. I installed the seal into the output bushing and the new hockey stick.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


And, a new nose cone boot.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


With the transmission cleaned up I was ready to bolt on the nose cone. I typically use gasket sealant which does not dry (stays tackey). It's worked for me in the past but I know there is a shunning of those who chose to use sealant. For something that stays tacky, is there a reason against using it? In this case it was applied to the gasket and then the gasket to the transmission.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


That's about it for the transmission work. I installed the shifting linkages, with new bushings and boots. I then installed the transmission and suspended it from the engine bay. I adjusted the shifter and I now have gears that are discrete, crisp, and easy to find. No photos of this part but it's there.


Last edited by Jack_O_Trades on Mon Mar 19, 2018 6:31 am; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Jack_O_Trades
Samba Member


Joined: August 14, 2014
Posts: 105
Location: Bay Area CA
Jack_O_Trades is offline 

PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2014 11:25 pm    Post subject: Rebuilding the Drive Shafts Reply with quote

With the transmission in, I could now install my driveshafts. These needed to be rebuilt because two of the four CVD's were worn out. I picked up two new CVD's and four boot kits. I also stripped, cleaned, and painted the exposed portion of the drive shaft.

I taped up the splines on the drive shaft so as to not damage the boots as they were forced over the splines.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Installing the CVD's was a messy process. There's alot of grease getting thrown around between the four CVD's. By CVD #4 I think I had the process down.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


When I went to install the drive shafts, I had problems with the crescent spacers. They wouldn't sit flat on the protective cap of the boot because of these ridges in the cap. I don't understand how these parts make it to consumers when they do not meet original form/fit/function. I imagine that I am preaching to the choir on this issue.

I had originally stripped and powder coated these spacers. I would now have to machine a notch, and re-powdercoat them. Nothing is ever easy.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Here is the original vs the modified

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


And, here is a fitting of the spacer to the new protective caps.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Once I re-powder coated the spacers, installation of the drives shafts was straight forward.


Last edited by Jack_O_Trades on Mon Mar 19, 2018 6:41 am; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Wasted youth
Samba Member


Joined: July 06, 2012
Posts: 3999
Location: California's Hot and Smoggy Central Valley
Wasted youth is online now 

PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2014 12:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm surprised you had such poor fit-up with your bushings, but it looks like you overcame the problem.

The early Baywindow CV boot flanges did not have the humps/ridges that are interfering with your application of the early style spacers. Please refer to Bentley, page 6-6, Fig. 3-4 for a look at early style CV boots and the Spacers. The late Baywindow and Vanagon spacers are shaped different and accommodate the newer style CV boot flanges, reasonably close to your modification. Look to pick up a set of late Baywindow/Vanagon spacers to make your life easier.

The next problem you might find one day as you grow your bus collection, is a mixed set of Triple Square cap screws and Allen Socket screws on the same bus. Ask me how I know!
_________________
1968 Double Cab truck, 1973 Auto trans bus, 1978 Auto trans Sunroof bus with A/C and a 1987 Auto trans Westfalia.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Gallery Classifieds Feedback
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic    Forum Index -> Bay Window Bus All times are Mountain Standard Time/Pacific Daylight Savings Time
Page: Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
Page 4 of 7

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

About | Help! | Advertise | Donate | Premium Membership | Privacy/Terms of Use | Contact Us | Site Map
Copyright © 1996-2018, Everett Barnes. All Rights Reserved.
Not affiliated with or sponsored by Volkswagen of America | Forum powered by phpBB