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Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s
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Globespotter
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2018 10:51 am    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

I'm kind of liking those new front logos.
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The Canadian
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2018 6:52 am    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

I went to have a look at another bus, its a 1991 which had the same owner from 91 to 2016! All original with many things added by the newer owner(who was a friend of the previous owner).

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


It has been lowered, Porsche wheels, Upholstery done, and a flat white wrap job. This bus has the typical Brazilian pre-1998 setup of 1600 engine, dual carbs, 4 speed, and barn doors.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The bus drove great so I decided to pull the trigger and buy(after doing the appropriate research and having the owner send me many pictures of the vehicle before it was wrapped).

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


The previous owner of the bus runs a popular youtube channel down here where he covers various VW related events as well as his own projects. Check it out here:

https://www.youtube.com/user/tchelopoeta/featured

After I brought the van home I had a few electrical issues with it to sort out, I ended up putting a new set of headlights in as the old ones had an issue with the highbeams, I also replaced the headlight relay and fixed the drivers door handle. All this in order to be ready for the Vistoria(inspection) which did not go well(more on this in the next post)…
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mark d
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2018 5:44 pm    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

congrats on the bus. looks great. i worked in brazil for about 10 years. they sure got a lot of buses down there
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2018 9:53 pm    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

Love seeing these Brazilian buses, do you have pics of the engine?

How does it feel and drive compared to old german bay windows?
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2018 2:32 am    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

Oh the flat white panel is nice inside. I like the seamed detail on the front kick panels. I am assuming that was not standard for the bus. Still a nice detail to see. Makes me consider another idea for my Restomod options.
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The Canadian
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2018 9:58 am    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

mark d wrote:
congrats on the bus. looks great. i worked in brazil for about 10 years. they sure got a lot of buses down there

They sure do!

visibleink wrote:
Love seeing these Brazilian buses, do you have pics of the engine?

How does it feel and drive compared to old german bay windows?


Here's a picture of the engine in the Blue 2002
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I actually don't have a whole lot of experience with German bay windows, when I used to live in Canada I always had muscle cars!

78BusGA wrote:
Oh the flat white panel is nice inside. I like the seamed detail on the front kick panels. I am assuming that was not standard for the bus. Still a nice detail to see. Makes me consider another idea for my Restomod options.


Yes, the kick panel is a custom touch added by the previous owner, I will try and get some better pics of it in the future.
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The Canadian
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2018 7:50 am    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

After picking up my second Kombi, I had fixed a few minor problems and thought for sure I would pass the Vistoria(inspection) with flying colours. I headed out to the inspection shop where I had the other van inspected and met with the same official as the last time. He took one look at the bus and greeted me with a frown- “I won’t look at that” he said. “Whats the problem?” I asked. Apparently having lowered suspension is the problem. “You need to take your van to a shop and get them to put your stock suspension back in, then I will pass you” This was not an option, as I didn’t have stock suspension for the van, nor did I have any interest in swapping it out. “Is there no other way?” I responded Spoiler- there is ALWAYS another way.

In this instance, the other way involved:
-finding a despachante(a “fixer”) who would open a process for my van in the motor vehicle registry system asking for a modification to the document of my van
-once that process was open I could schedule a time to visit another inspection agency which would then measure the height of my van from the ground to determine if it is within legal restrictions
-next if I passed this inspection, I would take the documentation to the motor vehicle registry and ask them to modify the registry document of my Bus to include “lowered” on it.
-I would have to wait for a new document to be made, then return and pick it up at later date
-with this document in hand I could return to the Vistoria and complete the inspection.

Needless to say, I did not do this.

At this point I had already met with the company that will be handling the exporting of the vans. Instead of talking to more officials, I asked the exporter “how can I solve this?” Turns out the solution was to simply transfer the title to his company, and he fixed the document before export. It still cost me a pretty penny to fix the docs in this way, but it was cheaper than swapping out the suspension!

Here's a photo of my busses at the port, more on that in the next post!
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.
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The Canadian
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2018 4:31 pm    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

Now that I had 2 Buses registered in my name, it was time to meet with the exporter and begin the next step of the process. I consulted with 4 different exporting companies in Sao Paulo, and ultimately chose to work with a company called Kombi4you, which is run by two guys called Thiago and Cadu. They gave me a full quote and spent time explaining each and every cost of the process. As of writing this post, my 2 buses have not yet arrived in Canada, and so I don’t consider this deal “done” yet. However up until now Thiago has been very good to work with.

Me giving a wave as we are stuck in traffic leaving Sao Paulo
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Thiago recommend that I load both buses on a flatbed and send them out to his storage facility(which is about an hour outside of Sao Paulo in a small town called Atibaia) in order await the next ship. I decided that driving each one there would be more interesting(and cheaper) so that’s what I did. In order to get to Atibaia, I had to take a Highway known as Rodoviária Fernão Dias, which connects Belo Horizonte and Sao Paulo, two of the largest cities in Brazil. The 3 lane highway is very busy, with cars on the outside lane moving at 120-140km/h and trucks on the inside moving at 30-80km/h. As you can imagine, this difference in speeds creates some hair raising action as large trucks jockey for position up and down the mountain passes.


Dropping the van off at the storage yard
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Lots of split windows sitting around
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


More over there
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


And more up the hill
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.



Once I had dropped my buses off at the storage area, the exporter took care of removing Both vehicles from the Federal Brazilian Auto Registration system in order be exported. The buses then sat for about a month awaiting the next ship(I ended up missing the first ship because it was overbooked, and so the freight company paid the costs for my container to sit at the port). And as of now they are on the way to Canada!


Here are some pictures of the buses loaded up in the container, ready for their Caribbean cruise.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Thats a wrap for now!
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.
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Manfred58sc
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2018 7:59 pm    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

Nice!! That replaces all the ones we lost to Europe...
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2018 10:34 pm    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

Must be one of the most interesting topics I've read. Thanks for sharing.
Would have loved to see if the diesel engine was a real thing, information on it is scarce.
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2018 8:23 am    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

The Canadian wrote:
mark d wrote:
congrats on the bus. looks great. i worked in brazil for about 10 years. they sure got a lot of buses down there

They sure do!

visibleink wrote:
Love seeing these Brazilian buses, do you have pics of the engine?

How does it feel and drive compared to old german bay windows?


Here's a picture of the engine in the Blue 2002
Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


I actually don't have a whole lot of experience with German bay windows, when I used to live in Canada I always had muscle cars!

78BusGA wrote:
Oh the flat white panel is nice inside. I like the seamed detail on the front kick panels. I am assuming that was not standard for the bus. Still a nice detail to see. Makes me consider another idea for my Restomod options.


Yes, the kick panel is a custom touch added by the previous owner, I will try and get some better pics of it in the future.


That engine looks as though it's equipped with Bosch Digifant electronic fuel injection as found on late-model Mexican VW Type 1 Beetles. This was the set-up that was used on the Brazilian-built, circa 1997~2005 VW 1600 Type 2s that were imported into Great Britain by Beetles (UK) Ltd.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digifant_engine_management_system

Back in 1997 & 1998, I wrote to the chief design engineer at the VW factory in Brazil, with the hope that I might interest VW there in adopting an optimised version of the rear-window wiper & washer system that I developed for my own 1973 VW "1600" Type 2 campervan, but never received any reply. Perhaps they don't get enough rain in Brazil to justify the extra cost!?!

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.

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Volkswagen Type 2 Owners' Club (Great Britain)

http://www.vwt2oc.net
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2018 8:47 am    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

Great Thread, I'm riveted. Very Happy
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The Canadian
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2018 5:12 pm    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

Manfred58sc wrote:
Nice!! That replaces all the ones we lost to Europe...


Well this certainly replaces two of them(good thing I plan on sending more!)

Sven F wrote:
Must be one of the most interesting topics I've read. Thanks for sharing.
Would have loved to see if the diesel engine was a real thing, information on it is scarce.


I can certainly get you some info on the Diesels. They were produced from 1981 to 1985, and available in the crew cab(3 door) pickup and the panel van. The engine was a 1.6L with a screaming 51 horsepower, which propelled the van from 0-100km/h in a blistering 30.2 seconds. Most people say that the engine was very underpowered for the application, however these vans have been known to get 15-18km/L. The engine was reportedly discontinued because of an inadequate cooling system.

Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Image may have been reduced in size. Click image to view fullscreen.


Its hard to find a Diesel Kombi for sale these days which still has the original engine, most of them have been converted to the 1.8L Saveiro Diesel or the 1.6L standard Kombi engine running on Alcohol, Natural Gas, or Gasoline. I really like the 3 door trucks, hopefully I can send a gasoline powered one up North next year.

Any other questions feel free to ask, one thing I have not been able to figure out is which car this 1.6L Diesel appeared in originally. Maybe someone here knows?


Last edited by The Canadian on Sat Sep 22, 2018 5:46 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2018 5:39 pm    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

NASkeet wrote:

That engine looks as though it's equipped with Bosch Digifant electronic fuel injection as found on late-model Mexican VW Type 1 Beetles. This was the set-up that was used on the Brazilian-built, circa 1997~2005 VW 1600 Type 2s that were imported into Great Britain by Beetles (UK) Ltd.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digifant_engine_management_system

Back in 1997 & 1998, I wrote to the chief design engineer at the VW factory in Brazil, with the hope that I might interest VW there in adopting an optimised version of the rear-window wiper & washer system that I developed for my own 1973 VW "1600" Type 2 campervan, but never received any reply. Perhaps they don't get enough rain in Brazil to justify the extra cost!?!


Hey Nigel, I do believe you are correct about the ignition on my late model Kombi.
As far as the rear windshield wiper is concerned, I would certainly like to take a look at what you installed on your bus if you have any other pictures. The picture that you added looks pretty slick.
As to why your design was never considered- I would say that it is a mix of cultural differences and the simple fact that Brazilian law did not require a rear wiper. I should also mention that the Transporter style bus left the factory with no rear view mirror installed, and looking back here is not too common. Its a different style of driving. Wink
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 8:31 am    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

The Canadian wrote:
NASkeet wrote:

That engine looks as though it's equipped with Bosch Digifant electronic fuel injection as found on late-model Mexican VW Type 1 Beetles. This was the set-up that was used on the Brazilian-built, circa 1997~2005 VW 1600 Type 2s that were imported into Great Britain by Beetles (UK) Ltd.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digifant_engine_management_system

Back in 1997 & 1998, I wrote to the chief design engineer at the VW factory in Brazil, with the hope that I might interest VW there in adopting an optimised version of the rear-window wiper & washer system that I developed for my own 1973 VW "1600" Type 2 campervan, but never received any reply. Perhaps they don't get enough rain in Brazil to justify the extra cost!?!


Hey Nigel, I do believe you are correct about the ignition on my late model Kombi.

As far as the rear windshield wiper is concerned, I would certainly like to take a look at what you installed on your bus if you have any other pictures. The picture that you added looks pretty slick.

As to why your design was never considered - I would say that it is a mix of cultural differences and the simple fact that Brazilian law did not require a rear wiper. I should also mention that the Transporter style bus left the factory with no rear view mirror installed, and looking back here is not too common. Its a different style of driving. Wink


In the past, I travelled in many 1st, 2nd & 3rd world countries, in which drivers commonly placed more reliance on divine intervention than either driving skill or sensible behaviour! Twisted Evil The principal device familiar to most drivers, is the audible warning device (aka horn); particularly in Cairo, Egypt, where nothing else is audible from dawn to dusk! It's no small wonder that the annual toll of deaths and injuries isn't several orders of magnitude higher

You will find a bit more information with pictures, posted several years ago in the following topic thread.

Forum Index > Bay Window Bus > 1968~79 VW Type 2 window wiper & washer upgrades

https://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=186468

I have some more 35 mm colour-film prints and quasi engineering drawings, which I will post when I am able to scan them at my local public library.

One donor vehicle of this type of rear-window wiper, is the late-1970s Vauxhall Chevette estate car, of which the Brazilian-built Chevrolet Chevette station wagon is a close sibling, but I don't know whether these had rear-window wipers.
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Volkswagen Type 2 Owners' Club (Great Britain)

http://www.vwt2oc.net
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NASkeet
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 8:17 am    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

In Great Britain, there is also a forum for owners of imported Brazilian built, 1997~2005 "bay-window" air-cooled VW 1600 Type 2s and 2005~2015 "bay-window" water-cooled VW 1400 Type 2s.

http://brazilianvwbay.forumotion.com/

NASkeet wrote:
You will find a bit more information with pictures, posted several years ago in the following topic thread.

Forum Index > Bay Window Bus > 1968~79 VW Type 2 window wiper & washer upgrades

https://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=186468

I have some more 35 mm colour-film prints and quasi engineering drawings, which I will post when I am able to scan them at my local public library.

One donor vehicle of this type of rear-window wiper, is the late-1970s Vauxhall Chevette estate car, of which the Brazilian-built Chevrolet Chevette station wagon is a close sibling, but I don't know whether these had rear-window wipers.


In Great Britain the Vauxhall Chevette estate car (aka station wagon in the USA) and the Bedford Chevanne (van version of the Vauxhall Chevette estate car) was available from 1976 until early 1984.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vauxhall_Chevette

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vauxhall_Chevette#chevanne

It appears that the Brazilian built Chevrolet Chevette station wagon was known as the Chevrolet Chevette Marajo, built from late-1980 until sometime in 1989.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_Chevette

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_Chevette#Latin_America

https://autoweek.com/article/classic-cars/7-chevrolet-station-wagons-america-never-got

Are any of the air-cooled or water-cooled, Brazilian-built, "bay-window" VW Type 2s equipped with a warning-light sensor for the brake-fluid reservoir, to activate a warning device (warning light or buzzer, etc) if the fluid level drops below a defined minimum level?

I recently found a donor vehicle, whose brake-fluid-reservoir, screw-cap with float-switch for a warning light, can be used to upgrade my 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 (a superb four-door saloon car, with 58 bhp engine, not available in the USA!).

I now seek to do the same thing with my 1973 "bay-window" VW "1600" Type 2. The screw-cap thread, is of approximately 27½ mm external diameter with a screw-pitch of about 3 mm.

The reservoir's unobstructed depth, from the top of the filler-neck to the bottom of the reservoir, is 79 mm.
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Nigel A. Skeet

Onetime member, plus former Technical Editor & Editor of Transporter Talk magazine
Volkswagen Type 2 Owners' Club (Great Britain)

http://www.vwt2oc.net
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 8:52 am    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

NASkeet wrote:
In Great Britain, there is also a forum for owners of imported Brazilian built, 1997~2005 "bay-window" air-cooled VW 1600 Type 2s and 2005~2015 "bay-window" water-cooled VW 1400 Type 2s.

http://brazilianvwbay.forumotion.com/

NASkeet wrote:
You will find a bit more information with pictures, posted several years ago in the following topic thread.

Forum Index > Bay Window Bus > 1968~79 VW Type 2 window wiper & washer upgrades

https://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=186468

I have some more 35 mm colour-film prints and quasi engineering drawings, which I will post when I am able to scan them at my local public library.

One donor vehicle of this type of rear-window wiper, is the late-1970s Vauxhall Chevette estate car, of which the Brazilian-built Chevrolet Chevette station wagon is a close sibling, but I don't know whether these had rear-window wipers.


In Great Britain the Vauxhall Chevette estate car (aka station wagon in the USA) and the Bedford Chevanne (van version of the Vauxhall Chevette estate car) was available from 1976 until early 1984.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vauxhall_Chevette

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vauxhall_Chevette#chevanne

It appears that the Brazilian built Chevrolet Chevette station wagon was known as the Chevrolet Chevette Marajo, built from late-1980 until sometime in 1989.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_Chevette

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_Chevette#Latin_America

https://autoweek.com/article/classic-cars/7-chevrolet-station-wagons-america-never-got

Are any of the air-cooled or water-cooled, Brazilian-built, "bay-window" VW Type 2s equipped with a warning-light sensor for the brake-fluid reservoir, to activate a warning device (warning light or buzzer, etc) if the fluid level drops below a defined minimum level?

I recently found a donor vehicle, whose brake-fluid-reservoir, screw-cap with float-switch for a warning light, can be used to upgrade my 1974 Triumph Toledo 1300 (a superb four-door saloon car, with 58 bhp engine, not available in the USA!).

I now seek to do the same thing with my 1973 "bay-window" VW "1600" Type 2. The screw-cap thread, is of approximately 27½ mm external diameter with a screw-pitch of about 3 mm.

The reservoir's unobstructed depth, from the top of the filler-neck to the bottom of the reservoir, is 79 mm.


Hey Nigel, thanks for all the info about your wiper system, and you are also correct out the Brazilian produced Chevrolet Chevette, in fact I see those around here all time!

Also that UK based Brazilian Bay window Forum is great, I am sure I will be spending hours reading all the info over there. Usually I am stuck digging on Brazilian mechanics Forums for info.


As far as the Brake Fluid Level Sensor, I'm not sure if the latest generation of Bay Windows(2006-2014) were equipped with this system but you can take a look at the reservoir by following this link:
https://produto.mercadolivre.com.br/MLB-976404922-...972014-_JM

It appears to have a plug on the cap, and looks like it could be level sensor.

As for the diameter and pitch, as well as depth of the reservoir, I can't comment at the moment, but next time I am near a bus I will take a look.


Edit- I also forgot to add that today my buses arrived at the port in Vancouver!
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2018 8:29 am    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

Brake-Fluid Reservoirs & Float-Switches

I finally found my spare RHD VW 1800 Type 2 brake-fluid reservoir (identical to that of my RHD 1973 VW “1600” Type 2 Westfalia Continental campervan), which bears the VW part No. 211 611 309 B accompanied by the letters GPO, surrounded by a circle.

Discounting the oval level-viewing window. The front surface of the reservoir would be convex. Looking at the reservoir, in plan-view (i.e. from above), orientated as it would be when installed in a 1973~79 VW Type 2 with the blister oval level-viewing window to the front, there are two fastening lugs with holes for self-tapping screws (sheet-metal screws, in USA parlance), located as follows:

· Attached to the right-hand side, in the front-most position
· Attached to the rear, in the left-most position

The reservoir’s dimensions are:

· 76 mm long (discounting the level-viewing window)
· 88½ mm long (including the level-viewing window)
· 51½ mm wide
· 60 mm high (discounting the filler-neck & screw cap)
· 84 mm high (including the filler-neck & screw cap)

How this compares with the brake-fluid reservoir (has wider filler-neck and screw-cap with integral float-switch) of the Brazilian built, 2005/06~2015 “bay-window” VW Type 2, remains to be seen!?!

Reservatorio Com Tampa Do Fluido De Freio Da Kombi 1997/2014 - R$154 •54

https://produto.mercadolivre.com.br/MLB-976404922-...972014-_JM

The moulded-in plastic mounting lugs appear to be in the same position, but at the moment, I cannot be sure about the dimensions.
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Onetime member, plus former Technical Editor & Editor of Transporter Talk magazine
Volkswagen Type 2 Owners' Club (Great Britain)

http://www.vwt2oc.net
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2018 1:37 pm    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

I have been having some major problems with my Buses at the Port of Vancouver(Fraser Surrey Docks) and so this project has hit a major delay. It has been a big learning experience for me.

On October 7th the Vessel carrying my container reached the Port of Vancouver and my container was unloaded from the ship. 3 days prior to this, the shipping company (Ocean Network Express) sent me an Arrival Notice/Invoice. The invoice was for about $500 USD, and it covers the unloading of the container and the filling of the paperwork with the Canadian Border Services Agency(CSBA). I Transferred this amount to Ocean Network Express immediately, as I know that any delays at the port can be costly(if your container is sitting on the dock for more than 5 days you begin to pay “Demurrage Fees” which can range from 50 to 150 dollars a day.

Here’s where the problems began..
October 11th
When my broker filed the paperwork in order to release the container, the shipment was rejected, and I was told that the Cargo Control Number(CCN) was invalid, or basically, it was not appearing in the computer system of the CSBA.

October 12th
My broker filed the paper work again, after confirming all details with Ocean Network Express, and it was rejected again. This time I was informed that the ship which my container was on had never made it to the Port of Vancouver. Yet the shipping company was saying that my container was sitting on the dock.

October 13-18th
I called my broker, the shipping company, and the CSBA, over and over to slowly work my back through the process to figure out what had gone wrong. Each party was giving me different answers or saying that it was the responsibility of the others. This was a very stressful time.

Finally I managed to figure out that the initial payment for my Arrival Notice had not been billed to the correct account, and so my paperwork was never released to the CSBA, and so it never existed in their system. Next I found out that my container had been transferred to a different ship in Columbia, yet the original ship that left Brazil was the vessel marked on my Bill of Landing, this had caused the confusion about whether or not the ship had been to the Port of Vancouver. Lastly, the computer system at Ocean Network Express was showing my documents as having been accepted by the CSBA, when in reality they had never been sent.

After I sorted all this out I thought the process would move forward, however my container was then flagged for a dockside inspection, in which the CSBA had to open the container and inspect its contents, this cost me another chunk of change and another day sitting on the dock(actually the whole weekend since they only work Monday to Friday)

October 22nd
My Container is cleared by customs, Finally! My Broker then contacted me and let me know that their Trucking company would be picking up the container on Oct. 23rd(today) and moving it to their warehouse for unloading.

My container sat on the dock for 15 days.

Also, I flew back to Canada in order to receive the Buses, and now I am sitting at the airport waiting to fly back to Brazil.

So, things have not gone as planned. But I have learned a lot.
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NASkeet
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Joined: April 29, 2006
Posts: 2189
Location: Canvey Island, Essex, UK
NASkeet is offline 

PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2018 8:19 am    Post subject: Re: Living in Brazil and Hunting Type 2s Reply with quote

The Canadian wrote:
I have been having some major problems with my Buses at the Port of Vancouver(Fraser Surrey Docks) and so this project has hit a major delay. It has been a big learning experience for me.

On October 7th the Vessel carrying my container reached the Port of Vancouver and my container was unloaded from the ship. 3 days prior to this, the shipping company (Ocean Network Express) sent me an Arrival Notice/Invoice. The invoice was for about $500 USD, and it covers the unloading of the container and the filling of the paperwork with the Canadian Border Services Agency(CSBA). I Transferred this amount to Ocean Network Express immediately, as I know that any delays at the port can be costly(if your container is sitting on the dock for more than 5 days you begin to pay “Demurrage Fees” which can range from 50 to 150 dollars a day.

Here’s where the problems began..
October 11th
When my broker filed the paperwork in order to release the container, the shipment was rejected, and I was told that the Cargo Control Number(CCN) was invalid, or basically, it was not appearing in the computer system of the CSBA.

October 12th
My broker filed the paper work again, after confirming all details with Ocean Network Express, and it was rejected again. This time I was informed that the ship which my container was on had never made it to the Port of Vancouver. Yet the shipping company was saying that my container was sitting on the dock.

October 13-18th
I called my broker, the shipping company, and the CSBA, over and over to slowly work my back through the process to figure out what had gone wrong. Each party was giving me different answers or saying that it was the responsibility of the others. This was a very stressful time.

Finally I managed to figure out that the initial payment for my Arrival Notice had not been billed to the correct account, and so my paperwork was never released to the CSBA, and so it never existed in their system. Next I found out that my container had been transferred to a different ship in Columbia, yet the original ship that left Brazil was the vessel marked on my Bill of Landing, this had caused the confusion about whether or not the ship had been to the Port of Vancouver. Lastly, the computer system at Ocean Network Express was showing my documents as having been accepted by the CSBA, when in reality they had never been sent.

After I sorted all this out I thought the process would move forward, however my container was then flagged for a dockside inspection, in which the CSBA had to open the container and inspect its contents, this cost me another chunk of change and another day sitting on the dock(actually the whole weekend since they only work Monday to Friday)

October 22nd
My Container is cleared by customs, Finally! My Broker then contacted me and let me know that their Trucking company would be picking up the container on Oct. 23rd(today) and moving it to their warehouse for unloading.

My container sat on the dock for 15 days.

Also, I flew back to Canada in order to receive the Buses, and now I am sitting at the airport waiting to fly back to Brazil.

So, things have not gone as planned. But I have learned a lot.


Murphy's Law states that anything that can go wrong will go wrong! Crying or Very sad

The corollary to Murphy's law is that Murphy was an optimist! Rolling Eyes

The key to living in Murphy's world without going crazy, is to anticipate what could possibly go wrong and then be prepared for it to happen. In other words, prepare for the worst and hope for the best.
_________________
Regards.

Nigel A. Skeet

Onetime member, plus former Technical Editor & Editor of Transporter Talk magazine
Volkswagen Type 2 Owners' Club (Great Britain)

http://www.vwt2oc.net
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