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  View original topic: Rekeying a lock - Tutorial FAQ Page: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
brandn Fri Aug 08, 2008 10:18 pm

I have already posted this up as a reply but I will post it up as a standalone so it is nice and easy to find on a search:

Ok Here we go.
First the disclaimer! Im obviously no locksmith and i dare say there are people out there who can do it other ways but this has worked everytime for me and i am now on one key!

The handle i am using is a front door handle, the process is the same for all locks, but the sliding door and hatch lock have a very little phillips screw which needs to be removed to release the barrel.

OK, you will need these bits. The extra wafers are optional:



First off, insert the key. This will stop the wafers flicking out when you pull the barrel as they are on little springs. Then remove the latch from the back of the lock and remove the little retainer spring:



Now you should be able to slide the barrel out, make sure the key stays in the lock so you dont lose the wafers.





Ok, lay the barrel down on its side and you should be able to see which wafers are sticking out, and therefore stopping the barrel from spinning. I have marked 2 definates and 1 possible on this lock:




Slowly remove the key whilst holding the wafers in as the key comes out to ensure they dont pop out.



Carefully remove the offending wafers, if the lock is clean they should just pop out, if not they may need some persuasion with a little screwdriver of plyers. I ended up removing three on this lock.




Stick the key back in the lock and take another look, all the pins should sit clean against the barrel now.



If they do, slide the lock back in and see if it will turn, this one turned nicely. If not check the wafers, one must still not be flush.





If you have extra spare wafers now is the time to use them, for me its trial and error, until you find one that works. There are not many sizes so it doesnt take long. If you dont have them its not the end of the world. I removed 3 wafers here, which left plenty in the barrel to form a lock. I have never had to remove more than 3.
Now is the time to use the silicone spray to clean up the lock and then a nice dose of grease gets it all moving nicely. This lock was super clean so i didnt bother but all my other ones have been heavely clogged up and needed a good clean up.
Ok time to put the lock together. With the key in the barrel slide it back in place, replace the spring, screw the latch back on:





Bingo.... one working lock... Repeat for rest of van, now sit back and congratulate yourself on another job out of the way!


calebmelvin Fri Aug 08, 2008 10:23 pm

Nice! I need to do this!

francispj Fri Aug 08, 2008 11:12 pm

thanks for that, will try - great to see your beer - have hurt myself with steinlarger- I used to drink the blue steinies when I lived there

EverettB Fri Aug 08, 2008 11:27 pm

Nice post, I added it to the favorite threads sticky at the top.

My input:
It would be best to have the full complement of wafers in there. Steal them from a junk handle if necessary.

Silicone spray is not a cleaner, it's better to use a solvent. I used spray carb. cleaner last time I did this.

The wafers I have examined have numbers on them. You usually have to clean them to see the numbers. This may assist you in analyzing which one you need to use.

brandn Fri Aug 08, 2008 11:38 pm

EverettB wrote:
My input:
It would be best to have the full complement of wafers in there. Steal them from a junk handle if necessary.

Silicone spray is not a cleaner, it's better to use a solvent. I used spray carb. cleaner last time I did this.

The wafers I have examined have numbers on them. You usually have to clean them to see the numbers. This may assist you in analyzing which one you need to use.

Agree with all that,
Cheers.

1975 Kombi Sat Aug 09, 2008 5:27 am

I think they make a lock spray lubricant made from graphite. Once the carrier has evaporated it leaves just a graphite coating. I am checking to see if wafers from a newer VW will work. I have a ton of handles from '85-'92 Jettas and Golfs. You might also want to have a clean cut key from the original code before you start. It gives you a more accurate job and at some point you may need new keys and they might have a slightly different outcome.

hazetguy Sat Aug 09, 2008 6:09 am

brandn wrote:



nice write up and good pics. i need to do this very thing to one of my door handles.
i am wondering why you inserted the lock cylinder so the "ear" of the key faces forward. was it a personal preference? i guess it does not matter which way the key faces as long as it all works?

1975 Kombi Sat Aug 09, 2008 6:18 am

hazetguy wrote: brandn wrote:



nice write up and good pics. i need to do this very thing to one of my door handles.
i am wondering why you inserted the lock cylinder so the "ear" of the key faces forward. was it a personal preference? i guess it does not matter which way the key faces as long as it all works?

I think it only goes one way but I will check. There are stoppers in the handle that only fit one way but I will check.

1975 Kombi Sat Aug 09, 2008 6:29 am

Ya the key only goes one way into the barrel but the barrel might go into the handle 180 degrees out but I don't think so. Even with all the wafers out the key only goes in one way.

The wafers seem to be group year specific. I tried the '85-'92 Jetta, Golf and they are too big for the '68-'79 barrels/cylinders.

peaceful warrior Sat Aug 09, 2008 10:12 am

Just a note, removing wafers makes your locks easily pickable. Everett is correct about having extras and they do have numbers. Another thing you can do if needed, is to file down a long wafer. It will work to get a clean shear line.

EZ Gruv Sat Aug 09, 2008 11:04 am

Great tutorial.
Just one thing though...you need better lighting. 8)

brandn Sat Aug 09, 2008 4:05 pm

EZ Gruv wrote: Great tutorial.
Just one thing though...you need better lighting. 8)

The flash is screwed on my camera so i had to just trust the kitchen spotlights!
Not sure if the barrel will go in another way, I just grabbed a spare handle from the garage and put a load of pics together quickly to reply to another thread, then i thought it might be useful as a post of its own but others might be able to refine it a bit.
'Peaceful Warrior', totally agree, the more wafers the better, but i guess if you dont have any spares, you get yourself a working lock that cuts out the opportunist thief, which is about all we can hope for from stock locks. A screwdriver will force it in about 5 seconds anyway.
Cheers.

EZ Gruv Sun Aug 17, 2008 8:40 pm

Just wanted to say thanks (again) for the tutorial; you inspired me.

My front door lock cylinders have actually been broken for a couple years. Actually broken inside where little pieces had fallen out. Anyway, I got ahold of an old door handle with a lock cylinder in it. Using a somewhat simplified version of your theory, I swapped wafers out of my broken cylinder into the good cylinder and viola! One working driver's side lock! No more entering through the slider!

I would not have thought it was so easy with this post.
Thanks!

I still need one more cylinder if anyone has one they would like to part with. It doesnt even have to have wafers in it. :wink:

brandn Sun Aug 17, 2008 10:59 pm

EZ Gruv wrote: Just wanted to say thanks (again) for the tutorial; you inspired me.

My front door lock cylinders have actually been broken for a couple years. Actually broken inside where little pieces had fallen out. Anyway, I got ahold of an old door handle with a lock cylinder in it. Using a somewhat simplified version of your theory, I swapped wafers out of my broken cylinder into the good cylinder and viola! One working driver's side lock! No more entering through the slider!

I would not have thought it was so easy with this post.
Thanks!

I still need one more cylinder if anyone has one they would like to part with. It doesnt even have to have wafers in it. :wink:

Nice one, cheers.
Glad its been of use. Like you say its not rocket science but until you see it in black and white its one of those jobs you tend to put off. having 3 or 4 keys that all look the same is a pain in the arse. Once its done being on one feels like a right luxury!
if you cant find that cylinder anywhere closer to home, let me know i have a couple of spares, i can stick one on the slow boat for you!

cafejane Mon Aug 18, 2008 10:14 am

Do you have any idea how to pull out the barrel on the engine cover door lock? I can't see any screws or anything holding it in.

I was just about to pay someone else to do all my locks for me. It is so amazing how these threads pop up just when you need them. Thanks for the great post.

honeybus Mon Aug 18, 2008 11:03 am

cafejane wrote: Do you have any idea how to pull out the barrel on the engine cover door lock? I can't see any screws or anything holding it in.

I was just about to pay someone else to do all my locks for me. It is so amazing how these threads pop up just when you need them. Thanks for the great post.

The engine cover door lock for the late bay with the 'R' key profile, is different from the engine cover door lock for the early bay with the 'L' key profile.


https://www.thesamba.com/vw/classifieds/pix/medium/2186615.jpg

https://www.thesamba.com/vw/classifieds/pix/medium/2186608.jpg

. . . . . Someone pipe in here, please..

The key cylinder/barrel of 'R' key engine cover door lock is easily removed by unscrewing the tiny screw, just as the poster mentions "sliding door and hatch lock have a very little phillips screw which needs to be removed to release the barrel."

The 'L' key engine cover door lock may need an additional explaination, as well as the 'L' and 'R' locks for the sliding door with the keyway in the handle.

The '68 has many unique features, with which I am very UNfamiliar. The front driver/passenger door handles are push button, and my be different in themselves.

honeybus Mon Aug 18, 2008 12:10 pm

Can the glove box key lock on a 1978 glove box be recoded to match an 'R' profiled key??

If yes, then how....

Anymouse

cafejane Mon Aug 18, 2008 12:46 pm

Opps, I just realized I meant the rear hatch lock and not the engine cover lock which mine does not even have.

However, my hatch lock cylinder does not have any small screws that I can find. I should probably have mentioned my bus is a '68. Is the lock different on a '68 like so many other things? The hatch is not original though due to an accident of the PO so I do not know for sure what year it is.

I believe it is still an "L" profile key because my ignition key fits inside it but it will not turn.

jtauxe Mon Aug 18, 2008 1:08 pm

I just recently completed a lock and mechanism overhaul, and have some suggestions to add. First off, I did the mechanisms, and I had a locksmith do the locks (all four) for about $100. I would have tried it myself if I had seen your post! But anyway...

The local locksmith frowned upon the use of graphite, and shuddered at the idea of grease for a lock lubricant. He said that grease would get gummed up with dirt and crud over time, and that graphite would do the same. He swore by teflon, and I must say it has worked beautifully.

There is a teflon-in-a-spray can for getting into hard-to-reach places. It has some liquid vehicle that evaporates, leaving a nice coating of teflon over everything. This I found at the local hardware store.

Another thing he turned me on to (and which I found on eBay) is powdered teflon. I now have a small bottle of it, which will be good for several lifetimes! This stuff you use like you would graphite, but it is much cleaner and more slippery.

So, my suggestion is simply to pass on the locksmith's advice: Use Teflon for a lock lubricant!

And, man, is it nice to have four matching locks that work smoothly! :)

honeybus Mon Aug 18, 2008 4:08 pm

Does anyone recommend Dupont Tri-Flow for locks?



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