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New Vallero tranny build for Hugo (1963 bug with 2185cc)
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dsimas62
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2015 11:00 am    Post subject: New Vallero tranny build for Hugo (1963 bug with 2185cc) Reply with quote

Hello everyone. Long time, no build thread! I've been busy, I got married! Oh and I've been training a wild mustang and driving a big rig over Donner Summit 3x a week. Yeah, lots going on and it's time that Hugo get a much needed upgrade. Many of you are familiar with my Daily Driver and the 2185cc engine that Ray Vallero and I did a build thread on a few years ago (1963 bug, see link in my signature). It's been fun, especially at the track. But the limiting factor to seeing what it's really capable of has been the old tranny. It's 15+ years old, with countless miles as a commuter.

Let me preface this thread by saying that this is not a manual on how to do things. I am not a mechanic. I have a great teacher and friend in Ray Vallero, and I am simply playing photo-journalist. Smile I know that my video resolution sucks, but that's my phone and I'm not buying a new one just for this. Also, the choices that we are making for this build are exclusively made for my unique use. This car is a driver, but also capable of the 13's at the track, so I want something streetable and able to take a beating.

We will be building this transmission complete outside the car. The entire center section; with axles, tubes and rear wheel bearings. Then we will swap it out into the car. Let's start with what I have. It's a 4.12 r/p with a close ratio 3rd gear. At the track, it sucked at the top end. Over-revving 3rd or lugging 4th, and I couldn't make the stripe in 3rd with any benefit to my ET. But this combination has suited me for 37 years with this car, great for around town, but 4th was high enough for the highway.

The current trans has taken some abuse. At the track, I've tried to always allow my ET to suffer in exchange for leaving the light cautiously, in exchange for being able to drive my car home and to work the next day. However, a few months ago while simply driving in town, we suspect it has lost a tooth or two in the small spider gears. It was probably cracked and finally went. So, it's time.

Ray's daughter Lynda build a cutaway trans as a highschool project and he is using it here for demonstration:


Link


We need to remove the stock ring gear carrier from this cutaway model so that Ray can show some basics to start this thread. I'm a girl, I like details for dummies. You are generally all guys out there, you are visual. I'm trying to satisfy us all. Razz

Ray has a VW Factory tool kit given to him when he was racing the Bug Iron in the 1960's. Tool #VW297. Way cool.

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And using it:


Link


Now that it's removed, he explains how things work.


Link


I'll be using a super diff housing in order to use four spider gears instead of two. This will probably initially be controversial with you all saying it will be dry and never last. We will be modifying it to solve that.


Link


This is what I have now:

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And what we will be going to:

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That's it for now. Next up, I will post up some more parts info. Stay tuned!
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Dawn

Hugo - '63 ragtop Cal Look bug - Hugo and Dawn - together since 1978
Engine build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=482095

Trans build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?p=7602210
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andy198712
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2015 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Congrats on the wedding Smile

Really interesting videos, i feel like i've learnt something so thank you!!
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dsimas62
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 27, 2015 1:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

andy198712 wrote:
Congrats on the wedding Smile

Really interesting videos, i feel like i've learnt something so thank you!!


Thank YOU. I'm so glad it's helping you. Smile

Okay, so we sent the carrier, all the gear sets, axles, and some bearings to be cryogenically processed. This procedure is becoming popular and makes the metal stronger and more able to dissipate heat. The way it was described to me is that they slowly bring it down to -350F and then hold it there for 12-24 hours. Apparently this makes the atoms the same distance from one another to become a stronger structured alloy. I'm not sure if this descibes it accurately, but I have cattle and they do it with sperm and it works. That's the extent of my first hand knowledge, lol. Shocked

We wanted to test this out. So, we also sent in a sacrificial 2nd gear. But before it went, we broke a tooth off and filmed it. We locked it into the vice the same way before and after.

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Before, this is very easy. One tap.


Link


Then, after cryo:


Link


That's success, definitely harder to break afterwards. Awesome sauce. Cool

We'll be using the latest case that came with two side covers.

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This passenger side cover is brand new:

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The other side will be billet aluminum so it's stronger for the pressure applied by the ring gear.

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The first modification will be to these side covers. The bearing is spinning so fast that it is normally difficult for oil to get in from behind. Ray will mill out an area on each one to allow oil to run over the top of the bearing and get behind it. It'll be a little dribble constantly while driving, behind the bearing on the outside of the diff housing. This will oil the fulcrum plates and the side gear. Here he explains this:


Link


As he gets ready to do this, he needs to set up the Bridgeport mill. First, his "big ass vice"... (and it's not smoking, lol)

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Link


Just a segment of the 10+ minutes it took to setup for a few seconds of milling. Razz


Link


And finally, here he is milling the passenger side plate.


Link


The milled out area is at the top so that oil spills down over the bearing. You can tell the top by the stud holes being further apart.

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Now the aluminum one.

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The hole is milled past the shelf that the bearing sits on to allow oil to go through to the back side of it.

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Next up, we will be modifying the ring gear carrier. Very interesting stuff!
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Dawn

Hugo - '63 ragtop Cal Look bug - Hugo and Dawn - together since 1978
Engine build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=482095

Trans build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?p=7602210
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Rome
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 27, 2015 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Over my 30 active years in the aircooled VW hobby I've taken maybe 15 engines apart and rebuilt them with varying success; though none further than mild upgrades. But I regard transmissions as a "black box", not having ever taken one apart. I'd simply install a few complete units, then cross my fingers that they are OK. So thank you for documenting and explaining your trans build's details, along with sharing some of Ray's clever improvements gained by decades of hard-service experience. This will be a very interesting build to follow.
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nextgen
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 28, 2015 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rome I totally agree. Ready fr for my total tranny vocabulary!!!

Freeway flyer

Tall 4th gear

Weld third and forth

Oh and I think what really scared us off was " YOU NEED SPECIAL TOOLING"!!

like Rome whom I met 36 years ago in junk yard rummaging for VW parts, we have been around doing VW stuff a long time and appreciate your Post.

Joe
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 28, 2015 4:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nextgen wrote:
Rome I totally agree. Ready fr for my total tranny vocabulary!!!

Freeway flyer

Tall 4th gear

Weld third and forth

Oh and I think what really scared us off was " YOU NEED SPECIAL TOOLING"!!

like Rome whom I met 36 years ago in junk yard rummaging for VW parts, we have been around doing VW stuff a long time and appreciate your Post.

Joe
Shocked You mean you don't know about the "Beef-a-Diff" and Heavy-Duty side covers? d'oh!


Very Happy
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 28, 2015 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I recently rebuilt my first stock swing axle trans, bungling though it with home made tooling and the Long Enterprises cd tutorial, and I'll be watching this, hoping to learn some more. It's a topic that gets little detail, so thanks for posting it!
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2015 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Today we are going to modify the ring gear carrier housing.  It's a super diff and that will probably make some people cringe because of the lack of oiling, lol.  But Ray says his mods can make it work and is excited to show you all how. 

As a reminder from day one, here's a super diff on the left and a stock carrier on the right.

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Here Ray shows where the spider and side gear are in relation to the oil hole on a super diff (inadequate).


Link


We will be enlarging the current two oil holes to 1".  There is one on each side.  Note the hole is in front of the paddle, which pushes the oil into it as it rotates.  By the way, a bus trans' carrier goes other way, so the hole would be on the other side of this paddle. 

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Here Ray explains the larger hole that we will create:


Link


And here he explains how these two new oil holes will not damage the integrity of the housing.  As he says at the end of this video, consider how large the holes are on a stock housing. 


Link


Milling the 1" oil hole.  This hole is not perpendicular, it is actually angled as a scoop.  You can see this by the angle of the housing to the bit entering it.


Link


First draft of the hole:

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Next, for even better flow, he will mill a "ramp" into the new hole.  Like on the hood of performance cars, rather than sticking up, it's recessed to help ease the flow in. 

Milling the "ramp":


Link


Done.

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Here Ray has assembled the side and spider gears inside the housing after milling it on one side.  He is comparing the difference in exposure of the gears through the manufacturer's hole and the larger one.


Link


Next up, the holes in the carrier housing for the side gear are tiny.  He will now be enlarging two of them to 5/8", opposite the large oil holes that he just milled.  This will make provisions for the side gear.  Again, he will put a swath in it so that it's a pumper.

In this picture, you can see both the 5/8" hole Ray just milled and manufacturer's smaller hole.  They are both in the darker narrow recessed ring on the housing.

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This picture is on the other side.  It shows both the new larger oil hole and the larger ring gear hole.

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Ray notices that the super diff is softer material than stock to grind.  That's why it needs lubrication!  Ray thinks that stock is cast steel, the super diff is a cast iron alloy.  All this work causes friction and makes it magnetic.  And probably causes global warming...  Razz

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Lot's of milling today!  Ray says, "Sometimes I wish all these parts were made out of wood, it'd be a lot easier."  Yeah, but then it wouldn't be so:

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Laughing

But wait, there's more!  He is also putting four new 5/16" holes in the thickest, widest part of the housing for oil to circulate out. Otherwise, it's a real sediment maker.  Another interesting point:  the longer the hole, the more draft it creates; so it actually pulls the liquid out.  If anyone has a woodstove, it's the same.  The longer the stove pipe, the better it pulls.  These holes will be long and deep.  These will also be showering the pinion head and pinion bearing, which will also be totally oiled.  Ray explains these exit holes.


Link


Here it is getting milled.  You can see the ramped swath on the new 5/8" ring gear hole behind the bit.

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Here is the end result.  A super diff housing that will not run dry!  Afterwards, in true Ray Vallero fashion, he grins as he sees all the shavings after today's work, "And now it'll be lighter too."  Heh, heh.   Very Happy


Link

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Dawn

Hugo - '63 ragtop Cal Look bug - Hugo and Dawn - together since 1978
Engine build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=482095

Trans build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?p=7602210
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dsimas62
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2015 12:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Boy, do I have news today! I don't know how many of you have Hagerty Insurance (Classic Car Insur), but we have always used them. My husband and I were nominated by a call center agent for Classic of the Year with Hagerty when I called to combine our policies and change my name. We met through VW's, got married in our VW's, honeymooned in our VW's with other VW's... Well, you get the picture. We won. Classic of the Year for 2014.

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They are flying out a media team to do a story on us. It will be on their website and magazine, etc. So, time for Hugo to get a new paint job in a big fat hurry. Cool Ray pulled the engine and trans today and put in a 3rd wheel so it will roll and we are towing it to the body guy in the morning.

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If anyone in the Sacramento area wants to see the big reveal and be interviewed by Hagerty's film crew (or just meet with them while they are here from Michigan), here's a Facebook event for a meetup on June 6 in Auburn at Mel's Diner. Join us, and then cruise with us to the Straight Up Dubs VW Show in Elk Grove afterwards.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1579290465659825/

Back to the transmission... Look what was stuck to the magnetic plug in my old tranny. Three guesses?

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Yep, *three* spider teeth. Just as Ray suspected.

Also, here's an opportunity to show you all the traction brace that Ray made last year. "Rabbit ears" that brace the trans to the firewall. I can't use a typical traction bar because when I "Cal Looked" the car back in 1978, the fenders were welded to the aprons in front and back. The beading was removed from the body at that seam for a smooth look for shows. It would crack there if I braced the trans to the body. So, here's what I have:

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And, yes, that is original paint! I have never painted the interior dash, trunk or engine compartment. I've only painted the exterior. This time we will paint the engine area. Going to be amazing. I will sort of miss that burnt section on the right where my old 40 Weber aircleaner caught on fire in 1992 at Sears Point Raceway... :/

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And one last thing for today. Here's a video of Ray explaining in layman's terms why a VW transaxle is so efficient. There are only a few inches between the engine and the transmission in a VW and that results in more horsepower getting to the wheels. And that's a win-win. Either, it's a 90# weakling and we need every bit of HP transferred to get up a hill... or it's a raped ape blowing the doors off a muscle car. Razz


Link


In my next update, I will show you one last modification that the ring gear carrier needed to clear my larger pinion head. Stay tuned!
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Dawn

Hugo - '63 ragtop Cal Look bug - Hugo and Dawn - together since 1978
Engine build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=482095

Trans build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?p=7602210
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dsimas62
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2015 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yesterday I had Hugo hauled from Vallero's VW Werks over to Jim Arbogast's, who will be painting the car while we finish the tranny. This is how you do it with only two front tires. Ray has this third wheel that makes it very stable and easy to move around.

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Link


By the way, I got a question on a youtube video asking where I bought the ring gear carrier. Mine is a Weddle, but they don't manufacture them there. Ray says he's bought them from three different places and they are all the same. I don't know where they are actually made.

Here's a little machining that we did last week. One more thing had to be done to the ring gear carrier. My pinion head is larger than normal, so he had to reduce the diameter of the housing to clear it.

Mine is a Gleason, it's on the left at 36mm. A stock pinion is on the right, it is 31.20mm.

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Here it is with the matching ring gear.

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Something interesting: When manufactured, a ring gear is lapped in on a Gleason machine, bolted into it like in the car. They move the pinion in and out and where it is the quietest, they write that number down. That number is stamped onto it and used to set the pinion depth.

We need to reduce the diameter of the housing to clear the pinion head at the point where it is touching in this picture.

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On to the metal lathe. This machine is huge and is as old as Ray, they were born the same year. Shocked

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At 1:14 in this video you can see the hole for the roll pin flashing in the lathe at the top edge of the carrier. He's watching that to know when to stop.


Link


Now it is about .040 smaller than factory. The material may look thin where that roll pin goes through, but Ray says that it will be fine.

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This is the small spider gear cross shaft and split roll pin. The slot in the roll pin will face the outside of the carrier housing, open end up, to only allow the solid part to press on the material. That way the open side isn't putting any pressure on the weakest spot. The pin will be holding it in also, so it will be supported adequately. (He will be grinding the cross shaft down shorter, but hasn't done that yet)

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Dawn

Hugo - '63 ragtop Cal Look bug - Hugo and Dawn - together since 1978
Engine build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=482095

Trans build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?p=7602210
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andy198712
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2015 12:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some interesting stuff there Dawn, thanks Smile

How do those ears mount to the gearbox?
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2015 6:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

When you decided to do the "ears" for the frame horn brace, did you consider using a "kafer" style frame brace? As it mounts to the shock mount, I doubt it could stress the body any more than driving a rough road.

Nice detail on this, Thanks!
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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2015 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

andy198712 wrote:


How do those ears mount to the gearbox?


Sorry for the confusion! After I posted those, I realized that I hadn't mentioned that this photo is simply a mock up to show them. They actually do not mount directly to the housing this way:

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As you can see, they mount to the two upper studs. But they actually mount on the studs after the engine is in between the fan housing and the nut. There's no way to get a photo of that though. Does that make sense?

esde wrote:
When you decided to do the "ears" for the frame horn brace, did you consider using a "kafer" style frame brace? As it mounts to the shock mount, I doubt it could stress the body any more than driving a rough road.


In case people reading don't know about a Kafer Bar, here's an example:
http://www.kustom1warehouse.net/Bolt_on_rear_truss_bar_for_VW_Volkswagen_p/6518-11.htm

Kafer bars are a good improvement to using a rear engine bar, but not as good as the rabbit ears. Ray has done the rabbit ears for decades and they are a relatively simple design with the best result. I took some new pics to elaborate a bit more about this subject since wheel hop is serious. First, consider the fact that the frame horns stick out quite a ways and are unsupported.

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Common ways to brace the transmission are by a rear trans mount, a mid mount, nose mount, and often a rear engine bar on the body (which often just *squeezes* the engine/exhaust). Here's a case showing all three mounts (on top of picture, which is the underside of the trans).

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Here it is in the car. The case, and the engine, is suspended out on the horns (which are long) and is secured only on the bottom. Even if you weld a brace or horns to a roll cage, or use the kafer bar to the shock mounts, you may stop the up and down motion of a wheel hop, but the transmission case still is able to rotate.

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Twisting the case can misalign the gearsets. With the rabbit ears, the case is secured from the top and on the rear end of the frame horns. We are addressing the twisting, not just up and down motion. And they leave the bottom of the car with a lot of room for coolers and access to everything. Very Happy

As for today, we will be assembling the gear set on the pinion shaft. First, Ray will be handpacking the needle bearing, instead of using a stock needle bearing cage. This doubles the load capacity. Here is a photo of a pinion shaft, pinion bearing, and a stock 1st needle bearing (not mine).

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Here Ray explains what we will be doing:


Link


In the 1970's, Ray would take two of these cages and break them apart and pull all the needles out. Then he would hand pack them onto the inner race with grease. Gene Berg loved the idea and finally started selling the needles for handpacking. This is from Gene Berg's Tech Manual & Parts Catalog:

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Here's the ones that we bought, sold loose for handpacking. Something that Ray developed! There are 43 needles in each bag. A stock cage has probably half as many. We are using them for 1st and 2nd gear.

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And this is the tedious (and messy) work to do it. It's not so bad if you use a lot of grease. We are doing it here only for demonstration. As you will see later, we have to take this apart in order to install the nut and preload the pinion bearing.


Link


After packing, we have almost 100% surface contact.

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Here Ray explains the late model pinion bearing that we will be using. It has the thrust washer built in for a more rigid bearing with a stronger thrust surface.


Link


Next up we will press the pinion bearing onto the shaft. Then preload it.

Two halves make it to where the bearing preload can be adjusted by torquing them. This can only be accomplished by a seasoned technician. If you try this on your own, you may destroy the bearing. Sometimes the new bearing preload is lighter than Ray would like.

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Pressing the pinion bearing onto the shaft.

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Next the inner race is put on the shaft with loctite. Followed by the small round nut. Then he will put this into a vice and torque the nut to create a small amount of preload.


Link


Preload is the inch pounds of torque required to turn it. It requires a torque wrench similar to the one here. We'll go into this more when we put the pinion into the case.

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Link


Why do you preload a bearing? Because any bearing is subject to a lot of load. We prefer to have zero clearance, so the bearing can't ramp up and change the parts location by movement. By preloading, we are ensuring that the pinion head is going to stay where it starts off. Mine will be light on preload because it's a driver. That may lighten as it breaks in, but then it will not have any clearance. If we didn't preload it now; as it breaks in, we may not have zero clearance later.
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Dawn

Hugo - '63 ragtop Cal Look bug - Hugo and Dawn - together since 1978
Engine build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=482095

Trans build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?p=7602210


Last edited by dsimas62 on Thu May 07, 2015 8:54 am; edited 1 time in total
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mark tucker
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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2015 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

keep up the great work. nice thread,Im in the process of building mine now.& doing a few upgrades too.
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Location: Auburn, CA
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PostPosted: Wed May 13, 2015 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mark tucker wrote:
keep up the great work. nice thread,Im in the process of building mine now.& doing a few upgrades too.


Thanks Mark!

Just a quick note that Hugo's paint is coming along. It's being done by Jim Arbogast in Auburn. He's retired and takes on a job as time allows. He prefers to do classics. He's been doing VW's for over 40 years. In the 1970's he had a contract with a VW dealership when everyone was trading in their '60's VW's for the new '70's models. They would send the trade-ins to him for fresh paint. VW's were so popular then that he was doing one every day!

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He's taking Hugo down to bare metal.

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The car has never been "restored" since I've owned it for most of its life. But needed some body work here and there. Like where all the chrome removal welds were, and also where it was dented on the front of the hood.

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I bought this decklid in 1979 at BOR's swap meet because Hugo's wasn't correct for the year. Turns out it was not straight at all.

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Painted the engine compartment for the first time. We had taken the felt off the firewall for the rabbit ears last year and the OG paint was covered in glue.

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All reassembled and getting a tow back to Ray's shop.

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Dawn

Hugo - '63 ragtop Cal Look bug - Hugo and Dawn - together since 1978
Engine build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=482095

Trans build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?p=7602210
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mark tucker
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Location: SHALIMAR ,FLORIDA
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PostPosted: Wed May 13, 2015 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

WOW Shocked
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dsimas62
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2015 1:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the last segment, we pressed on the large pinion bearing and small round nut and added preload. Now we put the needles back on and slide 1st gear over them, and add the 1st gear syncro ring. We added one shim to bring the clearance between 1st gear and 1st gear hub to within Ray's specifications.


Link


The locking ring on the small round nut is torqued and staked. The staking is so that it cannot rotate when it's in place in the transmission, unless done with a wrench or tool. We put Locktite on it also.

Before:

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During. He uses a flathead screwdriver on the edge and taps it with a hammer.

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After. See the small dent?

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Now for the dogs and clips:

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Here Ray is adding the dogs onto the 1st and 2nd operating sleeve and hub.


Link


Then the 1st/2nd operating sleeve and hub with the dogs in place go on the shaft.

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And now with 2nd gear syncro.

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3rd and 4th idler gears go onto the main shaft.

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Now with gear carrier housing set on them.

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Here are the main shaft ball bearing (large one) and small pinion needle bearing (4th gear end). Manufactured by Fag. To install these we will heat the housing to 160 degrees and then drop the mainshaft bearing in place and slide the pinion needle bearing in place, watching for alignment with the retaining bolt. The retaining bolt goes into the hole on the side of the housing, directly below the small bearing in the photo.

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This is just a mock up of where things will go. Here you can see the recession in the small needle bearing for the retaining bolt (but not lined up properly in the photo).

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_________________
Dawn

Hugo - '63 ragtop Cal Look bug - Hugo and Dawn - together since 1978
Engine build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?t=482095

Trans build thread:
http://www.thesamba.com/vw/forum/viewtopic.php?p=7602210
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fivelugshortaxle
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2015 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dawn, i really like the idea of how the "rabbit ears" work. Simple design yet effective. no up down and no twist. I think I'm going to try to expand on the design a bit. Do you have a picture of what's on the other side of the firewall?
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2332 with lots of goodies....
Rotating assembly balanced by Brothers VW
4340 84mm crank
AA 94mm p&c' s
Total seal 2nd ring, rest are Grants
5.5 h beams
Magnum straight cuts
Steve Long XR310 on a 106
CB 1.4 rockers
CB Magnaspark 2 distributor
NGK D7ea plugs
A1 lowdown 1 3/4 with single muffler
Dellorto 48's with 40 venturies
Kennedy Stage 2 with Daiken disc
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Bruce
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2015 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dsimas62 wrote:
  Note the hole is in front of the paddle, which pushes the oil into it as it rotates.  By the way, a bus trans' carrier goes other way, so the hole would be on the other side of this paddle. 

This is not true. Although the diff does rotate the other way when used with reduction boxes or in a mid engine car, the diff is also flipped over, so it sees oil coming at it on the same side of the paddle.
Next time you're working with Ray, tell him you thought this up on your own, then do a mock-up with the cut-away trans so he can see for himself.
Report back here what his reaction is as the student teaches the master something new.
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overheard at the portland Swap Meet... wrote:
..... a steering wheel made from a mastadon tusk.....
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fivelugshortaxle
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2015 8:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bruce wrote:
dsimas62 wrote:
  Note the hole is in front of the paddle, which pushes the oil into it as it rotates.  By the way, a bus trans' carrier goes other way, so the hole would be on the other side of this paddle. 

This is not true. Although the diff does rotate the other way when used with reduction boxes or in a mid engine car, the diff is also flipped over, so it sees oil coming at it on the same side of the paddle.
Next time you're working with Ray, tell him you thought this up on your own, then do a mock-up with the cut-away trans so he can see for himself.
Report back here what his reaction is as the student teaches the master something new.


Hahahaha....awesome!
_________________
Good things come to those who wait.
2332 with lots of goodies....
Rotating assembly balanced by Brothers VW
4340 84mm crank
AA 94mm p&c' s
Total seal 2nd ring, rest are Grants
5.5 h beams
Magnum straight cuts
Steve Long XR310 on a 106
CB 1.4 rockers
CB Magnaspark 2 distributor
NGK D7ea plugs
A1 lowdown 1 3/4 with single muffler
Dellorto 48's with 40 venturies
Kennedy Stage 2 with Daiken disc
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View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address Gallery Classifieds Feedback
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